Ed Healey

Edward Francis Healey Jr. (December 28, 1894 – December 9, 1978) was an American football player. Regarded as one of the best linemen in the early days of the National Football League (NFL), Healey was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of its second induction class in 1964. He was also named in 1969 to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team. In 1974, he was also inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

A native of Springfield, Massachusetts, Healey played college football at College of the Holy Cross in 1914 and at Dartmouth College in 1916, 1917, and 1919.

Healey played professional football as a tackle in the NFL for the Rock Island Independents from 1920 to 1922 and for the Chicago Bears from 1922 to 1927. He never played for a team with a losing record during his NFL career and, in 1922, became the first player in NFL history to be sold to another team. He was named as a first-team All Pro player by at least one selector for five consecutive years from 1922 to 1926.

Ed Healey
Ed Healey
Position:Tackle, guard, end
Personal information
Born:December 28, 1894
Indian Orchard, Springfield, Massachusetts
Died:December 9, 1978 (aged 83)
South Bend, Indiana
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:207 lb (94 kg)
Career information
High school:Springfield (MA) Classical
College:Dartmouth
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Healey was born in 1894 in Indian Orchard, a neighborhood at the northeast end of Springfield, Massachusetts.[1] His parents, Edward F. Healey, Sr., and Nora Healey were the children of Irish immigrants, both born in Massachusetts. His father worked in the street sprinkler business and later as a contractor in the wood business. Healey had four older sisters and one younger sister.[2][3]

Healey attended Central High School in Springfield, Massachusetts.[4][5][6] He then attended and played college football at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1914 and at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, for three years.[7] In Healey's three years with the Dartmouth football program, the teams compiled records of 5–2–2 (1916), 5–3 (1917), and 6–1–1 (1919).[8] Walter Camp reportedly called Healey "the best tackle I ever saw."[7][9]

Professional football

Rock Island Independents

Healey began playing professional football with the Rock Island Independents in 1920, the inaugural season of the National Football League (known as the American Professional Football Association until 1922). He helped lead the 1920 Rock Island team to a 6–2–2 record, good for fourth place out of 14 teams.[10]

Healey remained with Rock Island during its 1922 season when the team compiled a 4–2–1 record and finished in fifth place out of 21 teams.[11]

Healey began the 1922 NFL season with Rock Island. The team opened its season with a 19–14 victory over the Green Bay Packers before losing a close game, 10–6, against the Chicago Bears. George Halas, owner, coach and player for the Bears, was impressed with Healey's tough tackling, including tackling of Halas, and bought Healey's contract for $100. Healey thus became the first NFL player to be sold to another club.[12][13] Healey later recalled his pleasure at joining a team with superior facilities: "At Rock Island, we had no showers and seldom a trainer. At Wrigley Field, we had a nice warm place to dress and nice warm showers."[14]

Chicago Bears

Healey spent six seasons with the Bears from 1922 to 1927.[1] During Healey's tenure with the Bears, the club never had a losing season, winning at least nine games in five of the six seasons.[15] Healey was selected as a first-team All-Pro by at least one major selector each year from 1922 to 1926.[1][14]

In 1924, he ran more than 30 yards to tackle a teammate who ran the wrong way after intercepting a pass.[14] In 1925, he was the only player to be selected as a first-team All Pro by Collyers Eye magazine, the Green Bay Press-Gazette, and Joseph Carr.[16][17] In 1926, the Green Bay Press-Gazette called him "the best tackle in the Pro loop,"[18] and Bears owner George Halas later called Healey "the most versatile tackle of all time".[19]

Family, later years, and honors

Healey married Lucille Falk in November 1927.[20] After retiring from football, Healey and his wife lived in South Bend, Indiana, where he worked as a salesman and later sales manager for France Stone Company. Healey and his wife had a son, Thomas, in approximately 1938. The family later moved to Niles, Michigan.

Interviewed in 1949, Healey opined that, with the development of the platoon system, modern linemen were "something akin to sissies" and added, "In the old days we used to go on the field prepared for 60 minutes of work and nothing short of a broken leg, arm, or ankle could get us out of there."[21]

During his retirement, Healey received numerous honors for his contributions to the sport of football. These honors include the following:

Healey's wife died in September 1975.[25] Healey died three years later in December 1978 at age 83 from multiple causes, including malnutrition, cardiac and pulmonary failure, and cancer of the stomach and lung. He died at the Cardinal Nursing Home in South Bend, Indiana.[26][27] His funeral service was held in Niles, Michigan, and he was then buried at Calvary Cemetery in that city.[27][28][29]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Ed Healey". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  2. ^ 1900 Census entry for Edward and Nora Healey and family. Son Edward born December 1894. Census Place: Springfield Ward 1, Hampden, Massachusetts; Roll: 652; Page: 32B; Enumeration District: 0570; FHL microfilm: 1240652. Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  3. ^ 1910 Census entry for Edward F. and Nora Healey and family. Son Edward F., Jr., age 15. Census Place: Springfield Ward 1, Hampden, Massachusetts; Roll: T624_591; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 0596; FHL microfilm: 1374604. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line].
  4. ^ Freedman, Lew (September 15, 2008). "Chicago Bears: The Complete Illustrated History". MBI Publishing Company – via Google Books.
  5. ^ The Pnalka, Vol. IV. Senior Class of Central High School in Springfield, Massachusetts. 1913. p. 68.(Edward Francis Healey listed as mid-year freshman).
  6. ^ The Pnalka, Vol. VII. 1913. p. 72.
  7. ^ a b "Ed Healey profile". National Football Foundation. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  8. ^ "Dartmouth Big Green School History". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 11, 2016.
  9. ^ "Football Pioneers Are Honored". Alexandria (LA) Daily Town Talk. April 28, 1974. p. B4 – via Newspapers.com. open access(The quote attributed to Camp cannot be located in contemporaneous sources and appears dubious insofar as Camp never named Healey to one of his college football All-America teams.)
  10. ^ "1920 APFA Standings & Team Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  11. ^ "1921 APFA Standings & Team Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  12. ^ "From the Hall of Fame Archives: The 1920's All-Decade Team".
  13. ^ Illustrated, Editors of Sports (October 30, 2012). "Sports Illustrated Great Football Writing". Time Home Entertainment – via Google Books.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  14. ^ a b c "Ed Healey Bio". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  15. ^ "Chicago Bears Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  16. ^ "1925 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 11, 2016.
  17. ^ Chris Willis (2010). The Man Who Built the National Football League: Joe F. Carr. p. 217. ISBN 9780810876705.
  18. ^ "Chicago Bears Coming Here Sunday With Great Team: Paddy Driscoll, Ed Healey, Trafton, Mohardt, Walquist Listed as Stars of Bruins". The Green Bay Press-Gazette. September 21, 1926. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  19. ^ "Rooney, Six Ex-Players Elected to Pro Grid 'Hall'". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. February 28, 1964. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  20. ^ "Social Items". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. November 17, 1927. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  21. ^ Harry Warren (December 5, 1949). "Bears' Alumni Gather, Replay Steeler Game". Chicago Tribune. pp. 4–4 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  22. ^ "Three More Ex-Bears, 2 Packers Voted Into Pro Football's Hall of Fame". Chicago Tribune. February 28, 1964. pp. 3–1 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  23. ^ "Pro Football Hall of Fame Honoring First Stars". Racine (WI) Sunday Bulletin. August 24, 1969. p. 4B – via Newspapers.com. open access
  24. ^ "Healey chosen". The Lowell Sun. April 29, 1974. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  25. ^ "Lucille F. Healey". Find a Grave.com. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  26. ^ "Ed Healey Dies". Fort Myers (FL) News-Press. December 11, 1978. p. 2C – via Newspapers.com. open access
  27. ^ a b Indiana Death Certificate for Edward F. Healey, born December 28, 1894, died December 9, 1978.
  28. ^ "Services Held for Pro Football Hall of Famer Ed Healey". Ukiah (CA) Daily Journal. December 13, 1978. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  29. ^ "Ed Healey". Find a Grave.com. Retrieved December 10, 2016.

External links

1920 Rock Island Independents season

The 1920 Rock Island Independents season was the American football franchise's thirteenth season and inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA). The Independents hosted first ever APFA/National Football League contest on September 26, 1920. After the AFPA had been formed on September 17, 1920, Douglas Park was the venue as the Independents hosted the St. Paul Ideals, winning 48-0 in the new league's first contest.The Independents entered the season coming off a nine-win, one-loss, one-tie (9–1–1) record in 1919 as an independent team, which the team proclaimed to be the "Champions of the USA". After the 1919 season, several representatives from the Ohio League, another American football league, wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created.

A majority of the team stayed from the 1919 team, including the coaching staff, but Keith Dooley was added to the roster. The Independents opened the season with a win against the St. Paul Ideals, a non-APFA team. This was the first game in the history of the APFA. The team played all but one game at their home field, Douglas Park, and ended the season with a 6–2–2 record, which placed the team tied-for-fourth in the league standings.

The sportswriter Bruce Copeland compiled the All-Pro list for the 1920 season. Fred Denfield, Dewey Lyle, and Ed Novak made the first-team; Obe Wenig and Ed Shaw made the second-team; and Walt Buland and Freeman Fitzgerald made the third-team. Of all the players on the roster, only Ed Healey has been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1922 All-Pro Team

The 1922 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1922 NFL season. Teams were selected by the Canton Daily News (CDN) and by George Halas (GH). Halas selected a first team and a second team.

1922 Chicago Bears season

The 1922 Chicago Bears season was their third regular season completed in the National Football League, which changed its name from the APFA, and the first under the new franchise name. The team changed the name from Staleys to Bears because Halas wanted his football franchise's nickname to reflect that of team whose field he used, that being the Chicago Cubs.

The club posted a 9–3 record under head coach/player George Halas earning them a second-place finish in the team standings earning them a second-place finish, the second time in the last three years. Two of the three losses were to the Chicago Cardinals, both shutouts suffered "away" at Comiskey Park where the Cardinals played their home games. The other loss was to eventual NFL champion Canton Bulldogs. In none of their other games were the Bears seriously challenged, with most either shutouts or relative blowouts. Ed "Dutch" Sternaman led the Bears in scoring for the third straight season, with three touchdowns, 6 field goals, and 5 PATs, finishing with 41 points. His brother Joe Sternaman joined the team and starred by scoring 5 touchdowns and adding 2 PATs.

1924 All-Pro Team

The 1924 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1924 NFL season. Four players were unanimous first-team picks by both known selectors: guard Stanley Muirhead of the Dayton Triangles; quarterback Joey Sternaman of the Chicago Bears; and halfbacks Charley Way of the Frankford Yellow Jackets and Benny Boynton of the Buffalo Bisons.

1924 Chicago Bears season

The 1924 Chicago Bears season was their fifth regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–1–4 league record under head coach George Halas earning them a second-place finish in the team standings, the fourth time in the last five years. The Bears started slow with 2 ties and a loss, but quickly gained their stride, winning 6 of their last 8 games with two ties. The Bears only loss of the year was to the Cleveland Bulldogs, the eventual champions (the NFL officially considers the 1924 Bulldogs a different team than the Canton team from the previous year – however, all the players were the same). Despite coming in second, the Bears did defeat the cross-town rival Cardinals twice, both shutouts, and their future classic rival, the Green Bay Packers, once in a 3–0 shutout. The Sternaman brothers again carried the team, with Joe Sternaman having his best season. The younger Sternaman scored 6 touchdowns, threw for another, had 9 field goals, and 12 PATs, finishing with 75 of the Bears' 136 points.

1925 All-Pro Team

The 1925 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1925 NFL season.

1925 NFL season

The 1925 NFL season was the sixth regular season of the National Football League. Five new teams entered the league: New York Giants, Detroit Panthers, Pottsville Maroons, Providence Steam Roller, and a new Canton Bulldogs team. The Kenosha Maroons folded, with the Racine Legion and Minneapolis Marines mothballing.

1926 All-Pro Team

The 1926 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors at the end of the 1926 season as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro teams of the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL). Selectors for the 1926 season included the Green Bay Press-Gazette poll, the Chicago Tribune, and Collyer's Eye. Three players were unanimously selected as first-team players by all three selectors: fullback Ernie Nevers, halfback/quarterback Paddy Driscoll, and tackle Ed Healey.

1927 All-Pro Team

The 1927 All-Pro Team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors at the end as the best players at their positions for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1927 NFL season. Selectors for the 1927 season included the Green Bay Press-Gazette poll and the Chicago Tribune.

Frank Coughlin

Francis Edward Coughlin (February 28, 1896 – September 8, 1951) was an American football player and coach.

Holy Cross Crusaders football

The Holy Cross Crusaders football team is the collegiate American football program of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Patriot League, an NCAA Division I conference that participates in Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). The team plays their home games at Fitton Field.

List of Chicago Bears in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. They are currently members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL), and are one of two remaining charter members of NFL. Founded in 1919 by the A.E. Staley Company as the Decatur Staleys and based in Chicago since 1922, the Bears organization has become one of the most successful professional football teams, having won a total of nine professional American football championships—eight NFL Championships and one Super Bowl—second most in the NFL, behind the Green Bay Packers. The franchise has recorded 18 NFL divisional titles, four NFL conference championships, and the most regular season victories of any NFL franchise. In 1963, the Pro Football Hall of Fame was created to honor the history of professional American football and the individuals who have greatly influenced it. Since the charter induction class of 1963, 32 individuals who have played, coached, or held an administrative position for the Bears have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The Bears hold the record for the most individuals enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.Of the 35 inductees, 28 made their primary contribution to football with the Bears, while the other 7 contributed only a minor portion of their career with the Bears. Of the original 17 individuals inducted in 1963, three spent a majority of their careers with the Chicago Bears. This includes the founder, long time owner, and head coach George Halas, long time halfback and two-way player Bronko Nagurski, and the "Galloping Ghost" Red Grange. The first few years of the Hall of Fame's existence saw 14 Bear players enshrined. Jim Finks was enshrined due to his contributions to the team as a general manager, not a player. Mike Ditka was inducted into the Hall of Fame while serving as the team's head coach. The most recent Bear to be inducted was Brian Urlacher in 2018.

List of Chicago Bears players

The following are lists of past and current players of the Chicago Bears professional American football team.

Rock Island Independents

The Rock Island Independents were a professional American football team, based in Rock Island, Illinois, from 1907–1926. The Independents were a founding National Football League franchise. They hosted what has been retrospectively designated the First National Football League Game on September 26, 1920 at Douglas Park.

In 1926, the Independents left the NFL to become a charter member of the first American Football League, the only NFL team to do so. The Independents then folded along with the entire league in 1927.Pro Football Hall of Fame alumni Jimmy Conzelman (1920–1921), Joe Guyon (1924), Ed Healey (1920–1922) and Jim Thorpe (1924–1925) played for the Independents.

Walter Flanigan

Walter Harrison Flanigan (May 7, 1890 – June 18, 1962) was an American football player and owner of the Rock Island Independents. He was also one of the co-founders of the National Football League (NFL).

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