Ed Harris

Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an American actor, producer, director, and screenwriter. His performances in Apollo 13 (1995), The Truman Show (1998), Pollock (2000) and The Hours (2002) earned him critical acclaim in addition to Academy Award nominations. Harris has appeared in several leading and supporting roles, such as in The Right Stuff (1983), The Abyss (1989), State of Grace (1990), Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), Nixon (1995), The Rock (1996), Stepmom (1998), A Beautiful Mind (2001), Enemy at the Gates (2001), A History of Violence (2005), Gone Baby Gone (2007), Snowpiercer (2013), and Mother! (2017). In addition to directing Pollock, Harris also directed the western Appaloosa (2008).

In television, Harris is notable for his roles as Miles Roby in the miniseries Empire Falls (2005) and as United States Senator John McCain in the television movie Game Change (2012), the latter of which earned him the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film. He currently stars as the Man in Black in the HBO science fiction-western series Westworld (2016–present), for which he earned a nomination for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series.

Ed Harris
Ed Harris by Gage Skidmore
Harris in 2017
Born
Edward Allen Harris

November 28, 1950 (age 68)
ResidenceMalibu, California, U.S.
Alma materColumbia University
University of Oklahoma
California Institute of the Arts
OccupationActor, producer, director, screenwriter
Years active1975–present
Spouse(s)
Amy Madigan
(m. 1983)
Children1

Early life

Harris was born at the Englewood Hospital in Englewood, New Jersey, and was raised in Tenafly, New Jersey,[1] the son of Margaret (née Sholl), a travel agent, and Robert L. "Bob" Harris (1922–2014), who sang with the Fred Waring chorus and worked at the bookstore of the Art Institute of Chicago.[2] He has two brothers, Paul and Robert.[2] Harris was raised in a middle-class Presbyterian family.[3][4] His parents were from Oklahoma.[5] He graduated from Tenafly High School in 1969, where he played on the football team, serving as the team's captain in his senior year.[6][7]

A star athlete in high school,[1] Harris competed in athletics at Columbia University in 1969.[8] When his family moved to New Mexico two years later, Harris followed, having discovered his interest in acting in various theater plays. He enrolled at the University of Oklahoma to study drama.[1] After several successful roles in local theaters (such as the Jewel Box Theater [9][10] in Oklahoma City), he moved to Los Angeles and enrolled at the California Institute of the Arts, where he spent two years and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1975.[11]

Career

Early plays

Harris began his career on the stage. In 1976, he played an FBI agent in the world premiere of Thomas Rickman's play, Baalam at the Pasadena Repertory Theatre located at the historic The Hotel Carver. He followed that at the Pasadena Repertory Theatre in 1976 playing Lot in the West Coast premiere of Tennessee Williams's play Kingdom of Earth (aka The Seven Descents of Myrtle).

Television roles

From the mid 1970s to the mid 1980s, Harris found steady work on television. He had role in one episode of Gibbsville (1975), in one episode of Delvecchio (1977), in one episode of The Rockford Files (1978), in one episode of David Cassidy - Man Undercover (1978), two episodes of The Seekers (1979), one episode of Barnaby Jones (1979), one episode of Paris (1980), three episodes of Lou Grant (1979, 1980, and 1981), one episode of CHiPs (1981), one episode of Hart to Hart (1981), one episode of Cassie & Co. (1981), and one episode of American Playhouse (1984).

Subsequent success and acting career

Harris' first film role came in 1978 with a minor part in the suspense film Coma, starring Michael Douglas. His first major role in a film came two years later with Borderline (1980), in which he starred alongside Charles Bronson. In 1981, Harris played the lead, William "Billy" Davis, a king of a motorcycle riding renaissance-fair troupe (a role modeled after King Arthur), in Knightriders. The following year, he has a small role as Hank Blaine in Creepshow, directed by George A. Romero.

In 1983, Harris became well known after portraying astronaut John Glenn in The Right Stuff.[1] In 1984, he co starred in the Robert Benton directed drama film Places in the Heart; during production of this film, Harris met and married his wife Amy Madigan.

Also in 1984 he co-starred along with Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell in the Jonathan Demme directed World War II biopic Swing Shift and in 1985 played abusive husband Charlie Dick to Jessica Lange's Patsy Cline in the HBO film Sweet Dreams

In 1986, he received a Tony Award nomination in the Best Actor in a Play category for his role in George Furth's Precious Sons. He also won the Theatre World Award and Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play for his performance.[12] Harris then portrayed William Walker, a 19th-century American who appointed himself President of Nicaragua, in Walker (1987). That same year, he played Harry Nash in the HBO television thriller film The Last Innocent Man.

In 1988, he acted in Agnieszka Holland's To Kill a Priest, starring Christopher Lambert, based on Jerzy Popiełuszko and his murder under the Polish communist regime. It was well received by critics.[13]

In 1989, his role as David "Dave" Flannigan in Jacknife earned him his first Golden Globe Award nomination, for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture.[14] Also in 1989, he portrayed Virgil "Bud" Brigman in the sci fi film The Abyss, directed by James Cameron.

In 1992, Harris co starred as Dave Moss in the drama film Glengarry Glen Ross, based on the play of the same name by David Mamet. He won the Valladolid International Film Festival Award for Best Actor for his performance in the film. He next appeared in the films The Firm (1993) and Needful Things (1993), before portraying the lead role of Kyle Bodine in the neo noir film China Moon (1994).

In 1995, Harris portrayed Watergate figure E. Howard Hunt in the Oliver Stone biopic Nixon, and received his first Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor nomination for his performance as NASA Apollo Mission Control Director Gene Kranz in Apollo 13.[1] In 1996, Harris starred in and executive produced the television adaptation of Riders of the Purple Sage. That same year, he returned to Broadway as Major Steve Arnold in the Ronald Harwood play Taking Sides.[15] In 1998, his co starring role in The Truman Show earned him a second nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor,[16] and a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture win.[17]

Harris made his directorial debut in 2000 with the drama biopic Pollock, in which he also starred as artist Jackson Pollock. He was nominated for his first Academy Award for Best Actor (and third Oscar overall) for his performance.[18] To prepare for the role, he built a small studio in which to copy the painter's techniques. Two years later, Harris was nominated for his fourth Academy Award (third in the Best Supporting Actor category) for his role as Richard Brown in the British American drama film The Hours.[19]

In between the two Oscar nominated roles, he appeared in the biographical drama A Beautiful Mind (2001) and portrayed German sniper Major Erwin König in the war thriller Enemy at the Gates (2001). From June to July 2002, he starred in adverts for the Vauxhall Vectra in the United Kingdom.[20]

For his lead role as Miles Roby in the 2005 miniseries Empire Falls, Harris was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film.[21] Also that year, he played a vengeful mobster in David Cronenberg's A History of Violence (2005) starring Viggo Mortensen. In 2006, he portrayed composer Ludwig van Beethoven in the film Copying Beethoven,[22] and starred in the television documentary film The Armenian Genocide as American diplomat Leslie Davis. He next appeared alongside Casey Affleck and Morgan Freeman in the Ben Affleck directed neo noir mystery film Gone Baby Gone (2007).[23] Harris then co-starred as the antagonist Mitch Wilkinson in National Treasure: Book of Secrets (2007), alongside Nicolas Cage.[24]

In 2008, he co wrote, directed and starred along with Viggo Mortensen in the western Appaloosa. In 2010, he and wife Amy Madigan appeared together in Ash Adams' independent crime drama Once Fallen. Later that same year, Harris starred in the survival drama The Way Back as Mr. Smith. His performance received much critical praise, and he was suggested by critics to receive a fifth Oscar nomination.[25]

In 2012, he co-starred alongside Sam Worthington in the thriller film Man on a Ledge for Summit Entertainment.[26] He then won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film and was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie for his performance as Senator John McCain in the HBO made for television drama Game Change.[27]

In 2013, he appeared in the western thriller Sweetwater,[28] and starred opposite Annette Bening in the romantic drama film The Face of Love.[29] Harris then voiced Mission Control in Alfonso Cuarón's space epic Gravity (2013), starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney.[30]

In 2015, he portrayed the title character in the film version of the Shakespeare tragedy Cymbeline.[31] In 2016, he appeared alongside Madigan and Taissa Farmiga in The New Group's revival of Sam Shepard's Buried Child, for which he was nominated for the Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play.[32][33]

In 2016, he also began playing the villainous Man in Black in HBO's sci fi thriller series Westworld,[34] and had a co-starring role in the ensemble cast of Warren Beatty's romantic comedy drama Rules Don't Apply, with Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich. In 2017, he appeared in Dean Devlin's sci-fi film Geostorm, alongside Gerard Butler and Andy García.[35] Harris had been previously set to star in Alejandro González Iñárritu's Starz drama series The One Percent with Hilary Swank and Ed Helms.[36]

Harris co-starred in Darren Aronofsky's horror film Mother! (2017), alongside Jennifer Lawrence, Javier Bardem, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Domhnall Gleeson.[37]

Personal life

Harris married actress Amy Madigan on November 21, 1983, while they were filming Places in the Heart together. They have one daughter, Lily Dolores Harris (born May 3, 1993).[38]

On March 20, 2012, the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) merged to form a new union, SAG-AFTRA. Harris, along with others including Edward Asner, Martin Sheen, Valerie Harper, Michael Bell and Wendy Schaal, were opposed to the merger and sued SAG President Ken Howard and several SAG Vice Presidents, seeking to have the merger undone. They were unsuccessful.[39] The lawsuit was dismissed on May 22, 2012.[40]

Harris has a reputation for being serious on the film set. He told a journalist in 2006, "I don't like bullshittin'... so, I guess that comes across as serious."[8] On March 13, 2015, he was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in motion pictures, located at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard.[41][42] Harris received an honorary degree from Muhlenberg College on May 17, 2015.[43]

Harris is one of several actors who have been dubbed "the thinking woman's sex symbol" (others include Hugh Laurie and Denzel Washington).[44]

Awards and nominations

Year Award Nominated work Result
1983 New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor The Right Stuff Nominated
1984 Obie Award for Distinguished Performance by an Actor Fool for Love Won
1986 Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play Precious Sons Nominated
Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play Won
Theatre World Award Won
1989 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Jacknife Nominated
Saturn Award for Best Actor The Abyss Nominated
1992 Valladolid International Film Festival Award for Best Actor Glengarry Glen Ross Won
1995 Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Supporting Actor Nixon, Apollo 13, and Just Cause Won
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Nixon Nominated
Apollo 13 Won
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role Won
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor Won
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Nominated
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor Runner-up
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play Simpatico Won
1996 Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Riders of the Purple Sage Nominated
Bronze Wrangler for Television Feature Film Won
1998 Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor — Drama The Truman Show Won
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Won
National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor Won
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor Won
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role Nominated
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated
Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor Nominated
2000 Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Actor Pollock Won
Academy Award for Best Actor Nominated
Satellite Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Nominated
2001 Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture A Beautiful Mind Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Nominated
2002 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor The Hours Nominated
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role Nominated
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Nominated
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Acting Ensemble Nominated
Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor 3rd Place
London Film Critics Circle Award for Actor of the Year Nominated
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Cast Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role Nominated
Italian Online Movie Award for Best Cast Won
Italian Online Movie Award for Best Supporting Actor Won
2005 Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film Empire Falls Nominated
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated
Satellite Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Nominated
Women's Image Network Award for Best Actor in a Made-for-TV Movie/Miniseries Won
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actor A History of Violence Won
2007 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Solo Performance Wrecks Nominated
Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Solo Performance Nominated
2008 Boston Film Festival Prize for Best Screenplay Adaptation Appaloosa Won
Bronze Wrangler for Theatrical Motion Picture Won
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Acting Ensemble Gone Baby Gone Nominated
2012 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film Game Change Won
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Nominated
Golden Nymph Award for Best Performance by an Actor – Television Film Nominated
2016 Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Play Buried Child Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Westworld Nominated
2017 Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor on Television Won
2018 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Nominated

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Ed Harris". Inside the Actors Studio. Bravo.
  2. ^ a b Barnes, Mike (February 16, 2014). "Bob L. Harris, Father of Actor Ed Harris, Dies at 91". The Hollywood Reporter.
  3. ^ Stein, Ruthe (January 9, 2000). "Ed Harris Has the Righteous Stuff, Too: Actor plays a particularly convincing priest in `The Third Miracle'". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved December 10, 2007.
  4. ^ Pearlman, Cindy (February 6, 2000). "Love the sinner: Harris repents for 'money' roles". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved December 10, 2007.
  5. ^ Koenenn, Joseph C. (March 16, 1986). "Ed Harris: Inhabiting his characters". Newsday.
  6. ^ Rohan, Virginia (June 18, 2007). "North Jersey-bred and talented too". The Record. Retrieved June 25, 2007. Ed Harris: Class of 1969, Tenafly High School.
  7. ^ Stein, Ruthe (March 25, 2001). "They're Ready For Their Close-Ups: Camped out at Oscars, the starstruck wait to sneak a peek". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved May 31, 2007. She's hoping to score a seat near the front and catch the eye of Oscar nominee Ed Harris, who went to Tenafly High School in New Jersey with her mother.
  8. ^ a b Kachka, Boris (October 9, 2006). "Man, Oh, Man Ed Harris is not a control freak. Got that?". New York.
  9. ^ Thompson, Ryan. "Method Man: Ed Harris". The Rake. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  10. ^ NPR Staff (8 March 2014). "The Unforgettable Performance Ed Harris Doesn't Remember". NPR. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  11. ^ Cite error: The named reference bravo566 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  12. ^ "Ed Harris: Performer". Playbill. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  13. ^ To Kill a Priest, retrieved 2018-04-08
  14. ^ Ebert, Roger (March 24, 1989). "Jacknife Movie Review & Film Summary". RogerEbert.com.
  15. ^ Nassour, Ellis (October 16, 1996). "Ed Harris Seeks the Man Behind the Uniform". Playbill.
  16. ^ "The Truman Show - 1998 Academy Awards Profile". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  17. ^ Fleeman, Michael (January 24, 1999). "'Private Ryan', Spielberg Win Golden Globes". The Washington Post.
  18. ^ Helmore, Edward (February 25, 2001). "Ed Harris: The ultimate splasher movie". The Guardian.
  19. ^ Michael, David (February 12, 2003). "Ed Harris – The Hours Interview". BBC News.
  20. ^ "Ad of the Week: Vauxhall puts Vectra on trial". www.telegraph.co.uk. 18 June 2002. Retrieved 21 September 2017.
  21. ^ Hernandez, Ernio (May 28, 2005). "Philip Seymour Hoffman and Paul Newman Star in "Empire Falls" HBO Film, Debuts May 28–29". Playbill.
  22. ^ "How Ed Harris learned Beethoven". BBC News. November 2, 2006.
  23. ^ "Ed Harris Joins Ben Affleck's 'Gone, Baby, Gone'". MovieWeb. April 20, 2006.
  24. ^ Brevet, Brad (March 28, 2007). "Mirren and Harris Join 'National Treasure 2'". ComingSoon.net.
  25. ^ Lopez, John (November 11, 2010). "Could Ed Harris Finally Win an Oscar for The Way Back?". Vanity Fair.
  26. ^ McNary, Dave (October 29, 2010). "Ed Harris joins Summit's 'Man on a Ledge'". Variety.
  27. ^ Rose, Lacey (March 23, 2011). "Ed Harris to Play John McCain in HBO's 'Game Change'". The Hollywood Reporter.
  28. ^ Fleming Jr, Mike (April 17, 2012). "January Jones And Ed Harris Star In 'Sweetwater'". Deadline Hollywood.
  29. ^ McClintock, Pamela (February 8, 2011). "Diane Keaton, Ed Harris to Star in 'Look of Love'". The Hollywood Reporter.
  30. ^ Cochran, Amanda (March 8, 2014). "Did you spot Ed Harris in "Gravity"?". CBS News.
  31. ^ Kroll, Justin (August 5, 2013). "Ed Harris to Co-Star With Ethan Hawke in 'Cymbeline'". Variety.
  32. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (October 8, 2015). "'American Horror Story's Taissa Farmiga Joins Ed Harris, Amy Madigan In 'Buried Child' Revival". Deadline Hollywood.
  33. ^ Kroll, Justin (January 30, 2015). "James Franco Assembles Cast for Adaptation of 'In Dubious Battle'". Variety.
  34. ^ Stedman, Alex (August 11, 2014). "Ed Harris Joins HBO's 'Westworld' as Key Villain". Variety.
  35. ^ Kit, Borys (August 15, 2014). "Jim Sturgess, Abbie Cornish in Talks to Join Gerard Butler in 'Geostorm' (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter.
  36. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (July 22, 2014). "Ed Helms, Hilary Swank & Ed Harris In Talks To Star In Alejandro González Iñárritu's MRC Series 'One Percent'". Deadline Hollywood.
  37. ^ McNary, Dave (April 15, 2016). "Domhnall Gleeson, Michelle Pfeiffer Join Jennifer Lawrence in Darren Aronofsky Drama". Variety.
  38. ^ "Biography: Ed Harris". Lifetime. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  39. ^ Handel, Jonathan (February 27, 2012). "SAG/AFTRA Anti Merger Lawsuit Drops Demands". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  40. ^ Handel, Jonathan (May 22, 2012). "Dismissal Formalized in SAG-AFTRA Merger Lawsuit". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  41. ^ Saval, Malina (March 13, 2015). "Ed Harris Receives Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame". Variety. Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved 25 November 2018.
  42. ^ "Ed Harris". Hollywood Walk of Fame. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  43. ^ "Dr. Ronald Crutcher, national leader in higher education, announced as Commencement Speaker". Muhlenberg College. April 29, 2015. Archived from the original on May 3, 2015.
  44. ^ "'Wrecks' Actor Ed Harris Is Not a Control Freak". Nymag: 2. Retrieved 8 July 2017.

External links

2016 San Diego mayoral election

The 2016 San Diego mayoral election was held on Tuesday, June 7, 2016, to elect the Mayor for San Diego. Incumbent Kevin Faulconer ran for a second term as Mayor against former San Diego City Council member Ed Harris and former California State Assembly member Lori Saldaña.

Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan, though some candidates do receive funding and support from various political parties. The non-partisan primary was held Tuesday, June 7, 2016. Faulconer received a majority of votes in the primary, precluding the need for the November election.

A Beautiful Mind (film)

A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical drama film based on the life of John Nash, a Nobel Laureate in Economics. The film was directed by Ron Howard, from a screenplay written by Akiva Goldsman. It was inspired by a bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1998 book of the same name by Sylvia Nasar. The film stars Russell Crowe, along with Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Bettany, Adam Goldberg, Judd Hirsch, Josh Lucas, Anthony Rapp, and Christopher Plummer in supporting roles. The story begins in Nash's days as a graduate student at Princeton University. Early in the film, Nash begins to develop paranoid schizophrenia and endures delusional episodes while watching the burden his condition brings on wife Alicia and friends.

The film opened in the United States cinemas on December 21, 2001. It went on to gross over $313 million worldwide and won four Academy Awards, for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress. It was also nominated for Best Actor, Best Film Editing, Best Makeup and Best Original Score.It was well received by critics, but has been criticized for its inaccurate portrayal of some aspects of Nash's life, especially his other family and a son born out of wedlock. However, the filmmakers have stated that the film was not meant to be a literal representation of Nash's life.

Absolute Power (film)

Absolute Power is a 1997 American political thriller film produced by, directed by, and starring Clint Eastwood as a master jewel thief who witnesses the killing of a woman by Secret Service agents. The screenplay by William Goldman is based on the 1996 novel Absolute Power by David Baldacci. Screened at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival, the film also stars Gene Hackman, Ed Harris, Laura Linney, Judy Davis, Scott Glenn and Dennis Haysbert. It was also the last screen appearance of E. G. Marshall.

Apollo 13 (film)

Apollo 13 is a 1995 American space docudrama film directed by Ron Howard and starring Tom Hanks, Kevin Bacon, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise, and Ed Harris. The screenplay by William Broyles Jr., and Al Reinert dramatizes the aborted 1970 Apollo 13 lunar mission and is an adaptation of the book Lost Moon: The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13 by astronaut Jim Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger. The film depicts astronauts Lovell, Jack Swigert, and Fred Haise aboard Apollo 13 for America's third Moon landing mission. En route, an on-board explosion deprives their spacecraft of most of its oxygen supply and electric power, forcing NASA's flight controllers to abort the Moon landing, and turning the mission into a struggle to get the three men home safely.

Howard went to great lengths to create a technically accurate movie, employing NASA's technical assistance in astronaut and flight controller training for his cast, and obtaining permission to film scenes aboard a reduced gravity aircraft for realistic depiction of the "weightlessness" experienced by the astronauts in space.

Released to cinemas in the United States on June 30, 1995, Apollo 13 was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture (winning for Best Film Editing and Best Sound). In total, the film grossed over $355 million worldwide during its theatrical releases. The film was very positively received by critics.

Appaloosa (film)

Appaloosa is a 2008 American Western film based on the 2005 novel Appaloosa by crime writer Robert B. Parker. Directed by Ed Harris and co-written by Harris and Robert Knott, Appaloosa stars Harris alongside Viggo Mortensen, Renée Zellweger and Jeremy Irons. The film premiered at 2008 Toronto International Film Festival and was released in selected cities on September 19, 2008, then expanded into wide-release on October 3, 2008.

The film shares some narrative similarities with the 1959 Western Warlock, directed by Edward Dmytryk and starring Henry Fonda, Anthony Quinn and Richard Widmark. There is also a 1966 Western named The Appaloosa which stars Marlon Brando, but the two films are unrelated.

Cleaner (film)

Cleaner is a 2007 American thriller film directed by Renny Harlin, and starring Samuel L. Jackson, Ed Harris, Keke Palmer and Eva Mendes.

Game Change (film)

Game Change is a 2012 American HBO political drama film based on events of the 2008 United States presidential election campaign of John McCain, directed by Jay Roach and written by Danny Strong, based on the 2010 book of the same name documenting the campaign by political journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann. The film stars Julianne Moore, Woody Harrelson, and Ed Harris, and focuses on the chapters about the selection and performance of Governor of Alaska Sarah Palin (Moore) as running mate to Senator John McCain (Harris) in the Republican presidential campaign.

The plot features a 2010 interview of the campaign's senior strategist Steve Schmidt (Harrelson), using flashbacks to portray McCain and Palin during their ultimately unsuccessful campaign. The film was well received by critics, with Moore's portrayal of Palin garnering praise. Schmidt praised the film, though Palin and McCain criticized it and refused to see it. Alessandra Stanley of The New York Times described Moore's depiction of Palin as "a sharp-edged but not unsympathetic portrait of a flawed heroine, colored more in pity than in admiration."Game Change has earned many awards, including a Critics' Choice Television Award, a Directors Guild of America Award, a Golden Nymph Award, three Golden Globe Awards, a Producers Guild of America Award, five Primetime Emmy Awards, and a Writers Guild of America Award.

Geostorm

Geostorm is a 2017 American science-fiction disaster film directed, co-written, and co-produced by Dean Devlin in his feature film directorial debut. The film stars Gerard Butler, Jim Sturgess, Ed Harris, Abbie Cornish, Richard Schiff, Alexandra Maria Lara, Robert Sheehan, Daniel Wu, Eugenio Derbez, and Andy García. The plot follows a satellite designer who tries to save the world from a storm of epic proportions caused by malfunctioning climate-controlling satellites.

Principal photography began on October 20, 2014, in New Orleans, Louisiana. After poor test screenings, re-shoots took place in December 2016 under executive producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and new director Danny Cannon. The film is the first co-production between Skydance Media and Warner Bros. The film was released by Warner Bros. in the United States on October 20, 2017, in 2D, Real D 3D and IMAX 3D. Despite grossing $221 million worldwide the film was labeled a box office bomb given its $120 million budget, losing the studio $74 million, and received negative reviews, with criticism focused on the "uninspiring" story and "lackluster" visual effects.

Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture

The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year.

The formal title has varied since its inception; since 2005, the award has officially been called "Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture".

Five actors have won the award twice: Richard Attenborough, Edmund Gwenn, Martin Landau, Edmond O'Brien, and Christoph Waltz.

Gone Baby Gone

Gone Baby Gone is a 2007 American neo-noir mystery drama film directed by Ben Affleck. In his feature-length directorial debut, Affleck co-wrote the screenplay with Aaron Stockard based on the novel Gone, Baby, Gone by Dennis Lehane. The film stars Casey Affleck and Michelle Monaghan as two private investigators hunting for a little girl who was abducted from the Boston neighborhood of Dorchester. The supporting cast includes Morgan Freeman, Ed Harris and Amy Ryan.

Released on October 19, 2007, the film was well-received by critics and grossed $34.6 million worldwide against its $19 million budget. Ben Affleck was lauded for his directing debut by many critic organizations, and Amy Ryan received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress.

Paris Trout

Paris Trout is a 1991 made-for-television drama film directed by Stephen Gyllenhaal, starring Dennis Hopper, Barbara Hershey, and Ed Harris.It is based on the novel Paris Trout by author Pete Dexter.

Pollock (film)

Pollock is a 2000 biographical film which tells the life story of American painter Jackson Pollock. It stars Ed Harris, Marcia Gay Harden, Jennifer Connelly, Robert Knott, Bud Cort, Molly Regan and Sada Thompson, and was directed by Harris.

Marcia Gay Harden won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for portraying Lee Krasner, Pollock's wife. Ed Harris received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for his portrayal of Pollock. The film was a long-term personal project for Harris based on his previous reading of Pollock's biography.

Stepmom (film)

Stepmom is a 1998 comedy-drama film directed by Chris Columbus and starring Julia Roberts, Susan Sarandon, and Ed Harris. Sarandon won the San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress and Harris won the National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor, sharing the win with his role in The Truman Show.

Sweet Dreams (1985 film)

Sweet Dreams is a 1985 American biographical film which tells the story of country music singer Patsy Cline.

The film was written by Robert Getchell and directed by Karel Reisz. It stars Jessica Lange, Ed Harris, Ann Wedgeworth, David Clennon, James Staley, Gary Basaraba, John Goodman, and P. J. Soles.

The film was nominated for Academy Award for Best Actress (Jessica Lange). For all the musical sequences, Lange lip-synced to the original Patsy Cline recordings. The soundtrack of the same name was released in September 1985. This film has developed a cult following based on Lange’s acclaimed performance.

Swing Shift (film)

Swing Shift is a 1984 American romantic drama war film directed by Jonathan Demme and produced by and starring Goldie Hawn with Kurt Russell. It also stars Christine Lahti, Fred Ward and Ed Harris, Belinda Carlisle, and Holly Hunter (in one of her first movie roles).

The film received critical acclaim with, Lahti receiving a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress but was a box office bomb, grossing just $6.6 million against its $15 million budget.

The Abyss

The Abyss is a 1989 American science fiction film written and directed by James Cameron, starring Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and Michael Biehn. When an American submarine sinks in the Caribbean, the U.S. search and recovery team works with an oil platform crew, racing against Soviet vessels to recover the boat. Deep in the ocean, they encounter something unexpected. The film was released on August 9, 1989, and grossed $90 million. It won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects and was nominated for three more Academy awards.

The Hours (film)

The Hours is a 2002 drama film directed by Stephen Daldry and starring Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, and Julianne Moore. Supporting roles are played by Ed Harris, John C. Reilly, Stephen Dillane, Jeff Daniels, Miranda Richardson, Allison Janney, Toni Collette, Claire Danes, and Eileen Atkins. The screenplay by David Hare is based on Michael Cunningham's 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same title.

The plot focuses on three women of different generations whose lives are interconnected by the novel Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. These are Clarissa Vaughan (Streep), a New Yorker preparing an award party for her AIDS-stricken long-time friend and poet, Richard (Harris) in 2001; Laura Brown (Moore), a pregnant 1950s California housewife with a young boy and an unhappy marriage; and Virginia Woolf (Kidman) herself in 1920s England, who is struggling with depression and mental illness while trying to write her novel.

The film was released in Los Angeles and New York City on Christmas Day 2002, and was given a limited release in the United States and Canada two days later on December 27, 2002. It did not receive a wide release in North America until January 2003, and was then released in British cinemas on Valentine's Day that year. Critical reaction to the film was largely positive, with nine Academy Award nominations for The Hours including Best Picture, and a win for Nicole Kidman for Best Actress.

The Truman Show

The Truman Show is a 1998 American satirical science fiction film directed by Peter Weir, produced by Scott Rudin, Andrew Niccol, Edward S. Feldman, and Adam Schroeder, and written by Niccol. The film stars Jim Carrey as Truman Burbank, adopted and raised by a corporation inside a simulated television show revolving around his life, until he discovers it and decides to escape. Additional roles are performed by Laura Linney, Noah Emmerich, Natascha McElhone, Holland Taylor, Ed Harris, and Brian Delate.

The Truman Show was originally a spec script by Niccol, inspired by an episode of The Twilight Zone called "Special Service". Unlike the finished product, it was more of a science-fiction thriller, with the story set in New York City. Scott Rudin purchased the script, and set up production at Paramount Pictures. Brian De Palma was to direct before Weir signed as director, making the film for $60 million—$20 million less than the original estimate. Niccol rewrote the script while the crew was waiting for Carrey to sign. The majority of filming took place at Seaside, Florida, a master-planned community located in the Florida Panhandle.

The film was a financial success, debuting to critical acclaim, and earned numerous nominations at the 71st Academy Awards, 56th Golden Globe Awards, 52nd British Academy Film Awards and The Saturn Awards. The Truman Show has been analyzed as a thesis on Christianity, metaphilosophy, simulated reality, existentialism and reality television.

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