Ed Coady

Edmond Hoffman Coady (May 29, 1867 in Pana, Illinois – April 5, 1890 in South Bend, Indiana)[1] was an American football player and a starting quarterback for the University of Notre Dame, holding the distinction of having presided over the first two wins in Notre Dame football history.[2]

Following the first three games ever played by the team, quarterback Joe Cusack moved to left halfback in 1888, and Ed Coady assumed the position. His first start would also be the first victory for the program—a 20-0 win over Harvard Prep Chicago, who had previously been deemed champions of the state of Illinois. By virtue of their win, Notre Dame declared themselves champions of both Illinois and Indiana.

In 1889, Coady's team played their first true away game at Northwestern and won 9-0. During the game, Coady performed what was likely the team's first play-action fake: He simulated a handoff to end Steve Fleming, and hid the ball as he ran into the endzone for a touchdown.[3] Ed died in South Bend the following spring.

Ed was one of three Coady brothers to play for Notre Dame. His brother Tom Coady was the backup quarterback in 1888, and then Pat Coady would succeed his brothers as the starting quarterback in 1892.

Ed Coady
BornMay 29, 1867
DiedApril 5, 1890 (aged 22)

References

  1. ^ FindAGrave.com
  2. ^ Steele, Michael R (2002-08-01). The Fighting Irish Football Encyclopedia. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 364. ISBN 978-1-58261-286-7. Retrieved 2 July 2010.
  3. ^ Steele, Michael R (2002-08-01). The Fighting Irish Football Encyclopedia. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-58261-286-7. Retrieved 2 July 2010.
Coady

Coady is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

C.A.J. (Tony) Coady (21st century), Australian philosopher

Charles Pearce Coady (1868-1934), Member of the United States House of Representatives

Conor Coady (born 1993), English footballer

Ed Coady (born circa 1867), American football player

John Coady (born 1960), Irish footballer

Lynn Coady (born 1970), Canadian novelist and journalist

Mick Coady (born 1958), English footballer (Sunderland AFC, Carlisle United, Wolverhampton Wanderers)

Moses Coady (1882-1959), Roman Catholic priest, educator and leader of the co-operative movement

P. Coady (19th century), Australian cricket umpire

Rich Coady (disambiguation), multiple people

Siobhán Coady (21st century), Newfoundland and Labrador politicianGiven name:

Albert Coady Wedemeyer (1897-1989), American soldier

Coady Willis (21st century), drummer

List of Notre Dame Fighting Irish starting quarterbacks

The following individuals have started games at quarterback for the University of Notre Dame football team, updated through the 2018 season.

The year of induction into the College Football Hall of Fame, if applicable, is designated alongside the respective player's final season.

Pana, Illinois

Pana is a city in Christian County, Illinois, United States. A small portion is in Shelby County. The population was 5,614 at the 2000 census.

Pat Coady

Patrick Hoffman Coady (July 11, 1871 in Pana, Illinois – June 18, 1943 in Los Angeles, California) was an American football player and a starting quarterback for the University of Notre Dame.

Unable to sustain the momentum built up by the team's two first-ever victories in 1888-89, the Notre Dame football program took a two-year hiatus from 1890-91. Pat Coady, the younger brother of Irish quarterback alums Tom and Ed Coady, was instrumental in reviving the program in 1892, recruiting a completely new squad of players, and becoming the de facto team captain.

The new team played two games in the 1892 season, destroying South Bend High School 56-0, and then rallying from a 4-6 halftime deficit to tie Hillsdale College at 10-all.

Following graduation, Coady settled in Paris, Illinois where he married Helen Hennessy on September 2, 1902. They would later relocate to Los Angeles, California where Pat would open a law practice.

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