Ed Budde

Edward Leon Budde (born November 2, 1940) is a former American football player. He played professionally as an offensive guard for the Kansas City Chiefs in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL).

Ed Budde
No. 71
Position:Guard
Personal information
Born:November 2, 1940 (age 78)
Highland Park, Michigan
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school:Detroit (MI) Denby
College:Michigan State
NFL Draft:1963 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4 by the Philadelphia Eagles
AFL draft:1963 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:177
Fumble recoveries:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school and college

A product of Denby High School in Detroit, Michigan, and later Michigan State University, Budde was chosen as the number one draft pick of the American Football League's Kansas City Chiefs in 1963.

Kansas City Chiefs

Budde played for the Kansas City Chiefs for 14 years as the left offensive guard, longer than any other Chief except for punter Jerrel Wilson, by one year. From 1963 to 1971, he did not miss a single start, playing in all 14 games. Budde was 6'5 and 260 pounds (118 kg) with an unusual stance, in that he put his left hand down instead of the usual right. His explosive blocks often sprung a running back loose or kept defenders away from Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson. At the heart of the Chiefs’ offensive line with Jim Tyrer at left offensive tackle, his overpowering presence helped the Chiefs win two American Football League Championships (1966 and 1969) and a world championship in Super Bowl IV after defeating the NFL's Minnesota Vikings 23-7, with Budde able to handle the opposing right defensive tackle, Hall-of-Famer, Alan Page.

Budde was selected to the American Football League All-Star team in 1963, ‘66, ‘67, ‘68 and 1969, and played in six AFL All-Star games. He was selected for the Sporting News AFL All-League team in 1969. Budde was the first offensive lineman to be selected by the Associated Press as an Offensive Player of the Week.

Budde, who retired after the 1976 season, is a member of the All-Time All-AFL Team First Team.

His son Brad Budde was an All-American at the University of Southern California and also played in the NFL for the Chiefs, the only father-son combo to be first round draft picks for the same NFL team.

See also

References

  • Gruver, Ed (1997). The American Football League: A Year-By-Year History, 1960-1969. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 0-7864-0399-3.
  • History: The AFL - Pro Football Hall of Fame link
  • Miller, Jeff (2003). Going Long: The Wild Ten-Year Saga of the Renegade American Football League In the Words of Those Who Lived It. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-141849-0.

External links

1962 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1962 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season.

1962 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1962 Big Ten Conference football season was the 67th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1962 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1962 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Milt Bruhn, compiled an 8–2 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.2 points per game), and was ranked No. 2 in the final AP Poll. After losing only one game in the regular season, the Badgers lost to USC in the 1963 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Ron Vander Kelen led the Big Ten with 1,582 passing yards and 1,839 total yards and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the conference's most valuable player. End Pat Richter led the conference with 694 receiving yards and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1962 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Murray Warmath, compiled a 6–2–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), finished in second place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Tackle Bobby Bell was a consensus first-team All-American, won the Outland Trophy as college football's best interior lineman, and finished third in the voting for the 1962 Heisman Trophy.

The 1962 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Ara Parseghian, compiled a 7–2 record and finished in third place in the conference. The Wildcats were ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll before losing consecutive games late in the season. They remained ranked No. 16 in the final Coaches' Poll. Quarterback Tom Myers totaled 1,537 passing yards, and center Jack Cvercko was a consensus first-team All-American.

The conference's other statistical leaders included Michigan State fullback George Saimes with 642 rushing yards and Wisconsin's Lou Holland with 72 points scored.

1962 College Football All-America Team

The 1962 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1962. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1962 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

1962 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1962 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1962 Big Ten Conference football season. In their ninth season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 5–4 overall record 3–3 against Big Ten opponents) and finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference.Two Spartans were selected as first-team players on the 1962 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Halfback George Saimes received first-team honors from the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI), and center Dave Behrman received first-team honors from the AP. Saimes was also a consensus first-team selection for the 1962 College Football All-America Team. Guard Ed Budde was selected by Time magazine as a first-team All-American.The 1962 Spartans won all three of their annual rivalry games. In the annual Indiana–Michigan State football rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Hoosiers by a 26 to 8 score. In the Notre Dame rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Fighting Irish by a 31 to 7 score. And, in the annual Michigan–Michigan State football rivalry game, the Spartans defeated the Wolverines by a 28 to 0 score. In non-conference play, the Spartans also defeated North Carolina (38-6) and lost to Stanford (16-13).

1963 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1963 Kansas City Chiefs season was the 4th and inaugural season for the Kansas City Chiefs as a professional AFL franchise; Despite winning the AFL championship game the previous year, the Chiefs were 5–7–2 in 1963, third in the four-team Western division. The Chiefs were winless for two months in the middle of the season and were eliminated from the postseason in mid-November after ten games; they finished the season with three consecutive wins at home, with diminished attendance.

For the previous three seasons, the team was known as the Dallas Texans. Owner and founder Lamar Hunt moved the team following the 1962 AFL Championship. Despite enormous success in Dallas, Texas, the city could not sustain two professional football franchises (the other being the NFL's Dallas Cowboys). The team was renamed the Kansas City Chiefs and moved into Municipal Stadium alongside the Kansas City Athletics baseball team.

1963 NFL Draft

The 1963 National Football League draft was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, on Monday, December 3, 1962.The first overall selection was quarterback Terry Baker of Oregon State, the Heisman Trophy winner, taken by the Los Angeles Rams. The AFL draft was held two days earlier in Dallas.

1966 American Football League Championship Game

The 1966 American Football League Championship Game was the seventh AFL championship game, played at War Memorial Stadium in Buffalo, New York, on January 1, 1967.It matched the Western Division champion Kansas City Chiefs (11–2–1) and the Eastern Division champion Buffalo Bills (9–4–1) to decide the American Football League (AFL) champion for the 1966 season.

The host Bills entered as two-time defending champions, but the visiting Chiefs were three-point favorites, mainly because of their explosive and innovative offense led by head coach Hank Stram. The Bills were a more conventional team with a solid defensive line and a running mindset on offense. The two teams had split their season series, played early in the schedule without weather as a factor, with the road team winning each.

The Chiefs defeated the Bills by a score of 31–7, and advanced to Super Bowl I to play against the National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers.

1968 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1968 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1968 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1968 Kansas City Chiefs season was the 9th season for the Kansas City Chiefs as a professional AFL franchise; They finished with a 12–2 record, resulting in a tie for first place in the AFL Western Division with the Oakland Raiders, before the Raiders won the championship in a tiebreaker playoff, defeating the Chiefs 41–6. A location in Eastern Jackson County was chosen as the site and groundbreaking ceremonies took place in July with plans calling for a unique rolling roof design.

The 1968 Chiefs boasted one of the finest defenses ever assembled by the club, allowing an AFL record (and still franchise-low) 170 points, or 12.1 points per game. The nucleus of the defensive unit was clearly in its prime, producing six AFL All-Stars, including all three of the squad's linebackers.

Offensively, quarterback Len Dawson led the AFL in passing for the fourth time. Guard Ed Budde won the AFL Offensive Player of the Week award for the October 20 game against the Raiders. It was the first time the award was given to an interior lineman.

The Chiefs began the season with a 7–1 record and rattled off five straight victories to close the regular season at 12–2, sharing the division crown with the Raiders and setting up their playoff on December 22, in which the Raiders advanced to the AFL Championship Game against the New York Jets. The loss to Oakland was a major event in the Chiefs' rivalry with the Raiders, one of the NFL's most storied feuds.

1969 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1969 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1969 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1969 Kansas City Chiefs season was the team's 10th, their 7th in Kansas City, and also their final season in the American Football League. It resulted in an 11–3 record and a 23–7 victory in Super Bowl IV over the NFL's heavily favored Minnesota Vikings. The team beat their rivals, the Oakland Raiders in the final AFL Championship Game, claiming their third AFL Championship in franchise history. The Chiefs were coached by Hank Stram, led by quarterback Len Dawson and a powerful defense led by Bobby Bell, Willie Lanier, Buck Buchanan, Emmitt Thomas, Johnny Robinson and Curley Culp. The Chiefs' defense became the fourth defense in the history of pro football to lead its league in fewest rushing yards, fewest passing yards and fewest total yards. The Chiefs were the second AFL team to win the Super Bowl and last AFL team to do so before the AFL-NFL Merger in the following season.

The season was marred not only by an injury to quarterback Len Dawson but also controversy surrounding Dawson and his purported involvement in a sports gambling ring. Back-up quarterback Mike Livingston and the Chiefs' stellar defense led the Chiefs back to the Super Bowl, this time, to win it all.

Along with owner Lamar Hunt, nine future Hall of Famers were members of the 1969 Chiefs, including QB Len Dawson, LBs Willie Lanier and Bobby Bell, DT Buck Buchanan, DT Curley Culp, CB Emmitt Thomas, S Johnny Robinson, K Jan Stenerud, and Coach Hank Stram.

In 2006, the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs were ranked as the 18th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1969 Chiefs as the seventh-greatest defense in NFL history, noting "Hank Stram's 'Triple Stack' defense, which gave the linebackers lots of room to roam, was superb, holding five opponents to fewer than 10 points and giving up an average of less than two touchdowns a game.... Then they got serious. Against the [defending] Super Bowl champion Jets in the AFL divisional playoff game at Shea Stadium, the Chiefs held on for a 13–6 victory, thanks to a remarkable three-play goal line stand that stifled the Jets on the one. After losing twice to the Raiders during the regular season, the Chiefs allowed a single touchdown, in the first quarter, to win the AFL title over Oakland 17–7. The Chiefs defense then stifled the Vikings in the Super Bowl, allowing only two rushing first downs and picking off three passes in the fourth quarter to win 23–7. Total points against the Chiefs in the playoffs: 20." Kansas City is the only team in the Super Bowl era to win the title without allowing as much as 10 points in any postseason game.

1970 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1970 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's debut season in the National Football League, the 7th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 11th overall. It began with the Chiefs attempting to defend their Super Bowl IV championship title but ended with a 7–5–2 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1967.

Following their championship success, the Chiefs traded running back Mike Garrett, who was the club's all-time leading rusher at the time, to San Diego after a week 3 loss in Denver, and replaced him in the lineup with Ed Podolak. Despite a 44–24 win against soon to be Super Bowl V Champion Baltimore on September 28 in just the second-ever telecast of ABC's Monday Night Football, the Chiefs owned a 3–3–1 record at the season's midpoint. One of the season's pivotal junctures came in a 17–17 tie against Oakland on November 1. The Chiefs were ahead 17–14 when Len Dawson apparently sealed the win, running for a first down which would have allowed Kansas City to run out the clock. While on the ground, Dawson was speared by Raiders defensive end Ben Davidson in an infamous incident that cost the Chiefs a victory and further inflamed the already heated Chiefs-Raiders rivalry. Wide receiver Otis Taylor retaliated and a bench-clearing brawl ensued. Offsetting penalties were called, nullifying Dawson's first down. The Chiefs were forced to punt and Raiders kicker George Blanda eventually booted a game-tying field goal with eight seconds remaining. Following the tie with Oakland the Chiefs' defense would permit only 43 points over the next 5 weeks, which included 4 wins and 6-6 tie with the St. Louis Cardinals at Municipal Stadium. The Cardinals had come into that game with a streak of three straight shutout wins. The Chiefs' D held St. Louis to a late FG as the game ended 6-6. After a 16-0 shutout of Denver the Chiefs had played to a 6-1-2 record over the past nine weeks to stand 7-3-2 with two weeks to play and very much looked like a team with a chance to defend its championship. Then came the big one at Oakland, the game that would decide who reigned supreme in pro football's toughest division. The game on December 12 was a Saturday stand-alone NBC national telecast. The Chiefs led early 3-0, and the game was tied 6-6 at the half. But the Raiders, behind the angry running of Marv Hubbard, dominated the 2nd half in a 20-6 AFC West title clinching win for Oakland. The Chiefs still had a slim hope for the AFC Wild Card spot. They however needed a win by a poor Buffalo team in Miami and then a Chiefs' win in San Diego to make the playoffs. Miami jumped to a 28-0 first quarter lead and rolled to a 45-7 win. The Chiefs warming up to play the Chargers saw the Miami blowout and knew their reign as Champions was over. Eliminated, the Chiefs played a uninspired sleep walk game, losing 31-13. In the end it was that tie in November with Oakland that ultimately cost the Chiefs the opportunity to win the AFC West division title as Kansas City finished the year with a 7–5–2 record, while the Raiders went 8–4–2. The rules were changed several years later to assess such penalties as the Davidson-Taylor incident as dead-ball fouls after the play counted.

1971 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1971 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 2nd season in the National Football League, the 9th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 12th overall. They improved from a 7–5–2 campaign in 1970 to record a 10–3–1 mark and win the AFC West division championship, the Chiefs' first division title since 1966. The Chiefs tied with the Miami Dolphins for the best record in the AFC and were tied for the third-best record overall in the NFL, trailing only the 11–3 marks of the Dallas Cowboys and Minnesota Vikings.

Most of the pieces of the team which won Super Bowl IV two years earlier were still in place. Left defensive end Jerry Mays retired after the 1970 season, with Marvin Upshaw taking his spot, but the other 10 defensive starters were the same as they were two years prior. Middle linebacker Willie Lanier was a unanimous All-Pro selection following the season, and would likely have been named NFL Defensive Player of the Year had not Viking defensive tackle Alan Page become the second defensive player to win the league's Most Valuable Player award. Outside linebacker Bobby Bell, defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp, and cornerback Emmitt Thomas joined Lanier on the AFC Pro Bowl squad following the season. Bell, Buchanan, Culp, Lanier, and Thomas are all members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

On offense, Robert Holmes was traded to the San Diego Chargers midway through the season, leaving Wendell Hayes to assume the fullback duties next to third-year pro Ed Podolak, who had become the starting halfback when Mike Garrett was traded to San Diego in 1970. Morris Stroud, the tallest player in NFL history at 6-foot-10, and Willie Frazier, acquired from San Diego, alternated at tight end for the retired Fred Arbanas, but the rest of the offensive line, save for center Jack Rudnay, remained the same from the Super Bowl winning team. Rudnay assumed the starting center spot in 1970 over veteran E. J. Holub. At wide receiver, rookie Elmo Wright, the Chiefs' first-round pick in the 1971 NFL Draft from the University of Houston, assumed the slot opposite all-pro Otis Taylor, as Frank Pitts had moved on to the Cleveland Browns. Taylor earned selection to the Pro Bowl, along with guard Ed Budde, quarterback Len Dawson, and tackle Jim Tyrer.

Kansas City's special teams remained among the league's elite units, thanks to the combination of kicker Jan Stenerud and punter Jerrel Wilson, both of whom were named to the Pro Bowl. Podolak and Warren McVea handled the bulk of the return duties.

The season was the last for the Chiefs in Municipal Stadium, as owner Lamar Hunt and general manager Jack Steadman were overseeing the construction of Arrowhead Stadium, located at the junction of Interstate 70 and Interstate 435 in Jackson County, Missouri, at the eastern edge of the Kansas City city limits. Arrowhead, along with Royals Stadium, being constructed for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball, would form the Truman Sports Complex, bucking the trend of multi-purpose stadiums in vogue at the time.

The season ended in heartbreak, as the Miami Dolphins won the longest game in National Football League history on Christmas Day, defeating the Chiefs 27–24 in double-overtime on a 37-yard field goal by Garo Yepremian in the last football game in Municipal Stadium, as well as the last game for safety Johnny Robinson, who was an original member of the Dallas Texans in 1960. Coach Hank Stram often called the 1971 Chiefs the franchise's best-ever squad, and this loss haunted Stram for the rest of his life, even after his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Stram died July 4, 2005 at age 82. Others who are in the Hall of Fame from this squad are owner Hunt (who died December 13, 2006, at age 74), quarterback Dawson, and kicker Stenerud.

The loss to Miami began a nosedive in the Chiefs' fortunes. Kansas City backslid to 8–6 and 7–5–2 in 1972 and 1973, before falling to 5–9 and a tie for last in the AFC West in 1974, leading to the Stram's firing following the season. Kansas City would not reach the playoffs again until 1986, did not host (or win) another playoff game until 1991, and did not win the AFC West division title again until 1993.

1974 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1974 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League, the 12th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 15th overall, it ended with a 5–9 record and the Chiefs missed the playoffs for the 3rd straight year and third-place finish in the AFC West, Hank Stram was fired after the season and was replaced by Paul Wiggin in 1975.

While the club's sparkling new facility at Arrowhead Stadium was drawing rave reviews, the Chiefs roster was beginning to show its age. The result was the team's first losing season in 11 years as the club was unable to string together consecutive victories during the year, a first in franchise history. Many of the club's key players were entering the twilight of their careers: Len Dawson was 39, Jim Tyrer was 35, Bobby Bell, Buck Buchanan, and Ed Budde were 34, Dave Hill was 33 and Otis Taylor was 32.One of the year's few bright spots in the 5–9 season was cornerback Emmitt Thomas, who led the league with a franchise-record 12 interceptions. The final game of the 1974 campaign marked the final time all seven of Kansas City's Pro Football Hall of Fame players from the club's AFL champion era took the field together with coach Hank Stram. Including owner Lamar Hunt and seven future Minnesota Vikings Hall of Famers, an amazing total of 16 Hall of Fame inductees were involved in that 1974 season finale game. That 35–15 loss against Minnesota provided an anticlimactic conclusion to Hank Stram's illustrious coaching career in Kansas City. Three days later, Stram, the only head coach in franchise history was relieved of his duties on December 27 after compiling a 124–76–10 regular season record with the club.

1980 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1980 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League and 21st overall. They improved from 1979 from a 7–9 to an 8–8 record, the most wins for the franchise since an 8–6 season in 1972, but with missing the playoffs for the ninth consecutive season.

The Chiefs selected guard Brad Budde, the son of Chiefs Hall of Fame guard Ed Budde, as the team's first-round draft choice, making the Buddes the first father-son combination to become first-round draftees of the same team in NFL history. In a then-controversial move on August 26, the Chiefs released placekicker Jan Stenerud, who at the time was club's all-time leading scorer. He was replaced by journeyman Nick Lowery, who had been cut 11 times by eight different teams himself.After suffering an 0–4 start, the team rebounded to post a four-game winning streak. After Steve Fuller was sidelined with a knee injury late in the season, former Miami 12th-round draft choice Bill Kenney became the team's starting quarterback. He was so anonymous that when he appeared in that contest, the name on the back of his jersey was inadvertently misspelled "Kenny." Kenney went on to lead the club to a 31–14 victory against Denver on December 7 in his initial NFL start. The defense continued to evolve as defensive end Art Still and safety Gary Barbaro became the first Chiefs defensive players to be elected to the Pro Bowl in five seasons.

Budde

Budde is a surname of Scandinavian origin. Notable people with the surname include:

Brad Budde (b. 1958), American professional football player

Christoph Budde (1963–2009), German professional football player

Ed Budde (b. 1940), American professional football player

Gustav Henrik Andreas Budde-Lund (1846–1911), Danish zoologist

Jonas Budde (1644–1710), Danish-Norwegian army officer

Jöns Budde (c. 1435–1495), Finnish Franciscan friar

Kai Budde (b. 1979), German professional Magic: The Gathering player

Karl Budde (1850–1935), German theologian

Mariann Budde (b. 1959), diocesan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, D.C.

Robert Budde (b. 1966), Canadian poet, novelist, and professor

Ryan Budde (b. 1979), American professional baseball player

Theo Budde (1889–1959), Dutch jeweller, preservationist, and poet

Vincens Budde (1660–1729), Norwegian army officer

Jerrel Wilson

Jerrel Douglas Wilson (October 4, 1941 – April 9, 2005) was an American football a punter who spent 16 professional seasons, 15 of them with the Kansas City Chiefs, in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). Wilson played in college at the University of Southern Mississippi. Nicknamed Thunderfoot, he was selected to three AFL All-Star Teams and three AFC-NFC Pro Bowls. Wilson was elected to the Chiefs Hall of Fame in 1988.His punts were high, booming shots that arched far down the field, potent weapons in the war for field position. Wilson seemed to have the explosiveness of dynamite in his foot, hence the more-than-appropriate nickname of "Thunderfoot." The Southern Mississippi alum was the Chiefs' punter for a team record 15 seasons and is considered one of the best ever to play in the game.

Selected in the 11th round of Kansas City's much heralded 1963 AFL Draft that brought in Hall of Fame members Buck Buchanan and Bobby Bell and fellow Chiefs Hall of Famer Ed Budde, Wilson played more seasons than any player in team history, and his 203 games played are the third most for any player in franchise history behind only guard Will Shields (224) and kicker Nick Lowery (212). He retired with multiple team records including a franchise-record 1,014 punts during his career, highest average yardage in a career with 43.6, in a season with 46.1, in a game with 56.5. Wilson owns the NFL record for most seasons leading the league in punting average with four, leading in 1965, 1968, 1972 and 1973.

Hall of Fame head coach Hank Stram said that Wilson "made other people aware of how important the kicking game was at a time when special times were not given special consideration. I'm prejudiced, but he's the best punter I ever saw. He'll go down in history as the best kicker in the NFL."

Wilson had four career punts of over 70 yards, which included a league leading 72-yard boot in his rookie year. He was named to three Pro Bowl teams in three consecutive years from 1970 to 1972. Wilson was also a reserve running back for the Chiefs and early in his career, accumulating 53 yards on 22 carries spread out over seven seasons. To close his career, Wilson played the 1978 season for the New England Patriots.

Wilson said, regarding his punting style, "The way I attack the football, every time I hit it, I try to bust it, unless I'm around the 50. Then I hit it high. Basically, my power comes from everything. I try to snap everything I have in my body, my hips, knees, everything."

Wilson died of cancer on April 9, 2005, in Bronson, Texas.

List of Kansas City Chiefs players

This is a select list of players from the Kansas City Chiefs football team from the National Football League.

For more information, see Kansas City Chiefs.

Ed Budde—championships, awards, and honors

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