Ecchi

Ecchi (エッチ etchi, pronounced [et.tɕi]) is an often used slang term in the Japanese language for playfully sexual actions. As an adjective, it is used with the meaning of "sexy", "dirty" or "naughty"; as a verb, ecchi suru (エッチする), with the meaning to have sex; or as a noun, to describe someone of lascivious behavior. It is perhaps softer than the Japanese word ero (エロ from Eros), and does not imply perversion in the way hentai does.

The word ecchi has been adopted by fans of Japanese media to describe works with sexual overtones. In Japanese, the word ecchi is often used to describe a person's conduct, but in fandom, it has come to be used to refer to softcore or playful sexuality, as distinct from the word hentai, which connotes perversion or fetishism.[2] Works described as ecchi do not show sexual intercourse or genitalia, but sexual themes are referenced. Ecchi themes are a type of fan service, and can be found in most comedy shōnen and seinen manga and harem anime.[3][4]

Anime Girl
Clothing which is too short or transparent (wet or not) is a typical element in works is considered as ecchi.[1]

Etymology and use in Japan

The correct transcription of the word エッチ in Hepburn notation is "etchi".[5] However, it is typically written as "ecchi".

In the word hentai,(変態) the first kanji 'hen' refers to strangeness, and the second kanji 'tai' refers to a condition or state. Hentai was introduced in the Meiji period as a term for change of form or transformation in science and psychology. In this context, it was used to refer to disorders such as hysteria or to describe paranormal phenomena like hypnosis or telepathy.[6] Slowly, the meaning expanded until it had the meaning of non-standard. In the 1910s, it was used in sexology in the compound expression "hentai seiyoku" (変態性欲, abnormal sexual desire)[7] and became popular within the theory of sexual deviance (Hentai seiyoku ron), published by Eiji Habuto and Jun'ichirō Sawada in 1915.[8][9] In the 1920s, many publications dealt with deviant sexual desires and the Ero Guro Nansensu movement. Matsuzawa calls it a period characterized by a "hentai boom".[10] In the 1930s, censorship became more common leading to fewer books being published on this theme.[11]

After the Second World War, in the 1950s, interest in hentai was renewed, and people would sometimes refer to it just by the first English letter, H (pronounced as エッチ, /eɪtʃ/). In 1952, the magazine Shukan Asahi reported that a woman who was groped by a stranger in a movie theater reacted with "ara etchi yo" ("hey, that's perverse"). In this context, etchi should be understood as sexually forward and is synonymous to iyarashii (嫌らしい, dirty or disgusting) or sukebe (すけべ, a person with sex on the brain). From this, the word etchi started to branch off, and assume new connotations. In the 1960s, etchi started to be used by youth to refer to sex in general. By the 1980s, it was used to mean sex as in the phrase etchi suru (to have sex).[6][12][13]

Other neologisms such as sekkusu are often used to refer to sex, in addition to the term ecchi. Ecchi is now used as a qualifier for anything related to erotic or pornographic content. Its exact meaning varies with context, but in general, it is most similar to the English word "naughty" (when used as an adjective). The Japanese media tend to use other words, e.g. ero-manga (エロ), adult manga (アダルト), or anime / manga for persons over 18 years (18禁アニメ, 18禁). The prefix "H-" is also sometimes used to refer to pornographic genres, e.g. H-anime, H-manga, etc.

Western usage

In Japan, oiroke manga (お色気漫画) is used to describe manga with very light or playful erotic content such as is found in shonen manga. In western nations though, ecchi has become the preferred term. The more explicit seijin manga (成人向け漫画, seijinmukemanga) are more likely to be referred to as hentai in the west. This does correlate to a similar distinction in Japanese. For instance, if a young woman were to call a young man e(t/c)chi, that might be construed as flirting, whereas hentai sounds more like condemnation.[14]

[...] Bezeichnet erotische Darstellungen. Im Vergleich zu Hentai weniger explizit.
[...] [Ecchi] refers to erotic depictions. In comparison to hentai, it is less explicit.

— Sebastian Keller, Der Manga und seine Szene in Deutschland von den Anfängen in den 1980er Jahren bis zur Gegenwart: Manga- mehr als nur große Augen[2]

Works aimed at a female audience can contain scenes which are seen as ecchi. Examples are R-18 Love Report! from Emiko Sugi and Oruchuban Ebichu from Risa Itō, which are aimed at the shōjo and josei audience, but contain rather explicit content.[3][4]

Common elements of ecchi include conversations with sexual references or misunderstandings (e.g. double entendre or innuendo), misunderstandings in visual depictions (e.g. suggestive posing), revealing or sexualized clothing (e.g. underwear or cosplay), nudity (e.g. ripped apart clothing, wet clothing, clothing malfunctions) and the portrayal of certain actions (e.g. groping). This kind of sexuality is often used for comical effect. A typical example scene would contain a male protagonist that trips over a female character, giving the impression of sexual harassment.

The concept of ecchi is very closely related to fan service. While fan service describes every aspect to please the fans, ecchi relates to sexual themes. A special kind of fan service, that is usually bound or justified by the narrative.[15]

Typical examples

There are many elements that may classify a work as ecchi, but these elements have to occur quite often (for example, in all episodes of a show). Graphically speaking, different techniques are used to show sexy pictures, usually by revealing parts of the female body such as the back or breasts. Some of these patterns are recurrent, such as scenes in a shower, onsen, or fighting scenes in which clothes are torn apart. The imagination of characters is also a common device for showing their sexual fantasies, as well as transformation scenes of magical girls. In the end, any excuse is valid to show a character partially or completely nude.[1]

Nudity

Censorship in anime
Censorship with artificial light rays is one common method to hide some elements in anime television series. The degree of censorship can vary widely across television stations, even among those broadcasting the series at the same time.

Levels of nudity vary strongly between works depending on the intended audience and the preferences of the authors. For example, in some cases, though the breasts are shown on the screen, nipples and genitals are obscured by props, clothing, or effects. This kind of censorship was typical for Lala in To Love-Ru, Blair in Soul Eater or even Asuka Langley Soryu from Neon Genesis Evangelion. Meanwhile, in Ladies versus Butlers! and other anime, the nipples are clearly visible through clothing, no matter how thick it is. Nosebleeds are a typical reaction to nudity in Japanese works, as they represent sexual arousal, this is due to an exaggeration of high blood pressure whilst so.

Panties

The visibility of the underwear (panties) is one common motif. Typically the male will react in an exaggerated manner and be castigated. The color and style of the panties are seen as an indication of the female's character, e.g. white for innocent characters, striped for shy characters, and red for sexually aggressive characters. Panties are a popular main theme in ecchi (for instance, Chobits and Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt feature them heavily), but they are also featured in other shows just for sexual appeal.

Kogaru1
Another image frequently associated with Ecchi, though it is closer to the hentai section of anime. This may also be referred to as a panty shot.

Sexual activity

Although revealing or sexualized clothing, nudity or groping may occur in ecchi works, there usually is no explicit sexual intercourse in the works in the west; such works are classified as hentai. However, in an ecchi work, it may appear as if a couple are having sex. For instance, the two may be seen in silhouette from outside a tent, appearing to be having sex, although they are doing something nonsexual.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Steiff, Josef; Tamplin, Tristan D. (2010). Anime and Philosophy. Popular Culture and Philosophy. Vol. 47. Open Court Puplishing. ISBN 978-0-8126-9670-7.
  2. ^ a b Sebastian Keller: Der Manga und seine Szene in Deutschland von den Anfängen in den 1980er Jahren bis zur Gegenwart: Manga- mehr als nur große Augen, GRIN Verlag, 2008, ISBN 978-3-638-94029-0, p. 127
  3. ^ a b Robin E. Brenner: Understanding manga and anime. Libraries Unlimited, 2007, ISBN 978-1-59158-332-5, p. 89.
  4. ^ a b Ask John: Why Do Americans Hate Harem Anime?. animenation.net. May 20. 2005. Note: fan service and ecchi refer to similar concepts.
  5. ^ After the sources of the article Hepburn romanization. In Hepburn, the sokuon (っ, small tsu) is romanized t before ch.
  6. ^ a b Hikaru, Saitō (2004). Hentai—H. Sei no yōgoshū (Kansai seiyoku kenkyūkai ed.). Kōdansha gendaishinsho. pp. 45–58.
  7. ^ Robertson, Jennifer (1991). Gender and the State in Japan. Theatrical Resistance, Theatres of Restraint: The Takarazuka Revue and the "State Theatre" Movement in Japan. Vol. 64. The George Washington University Institute for Ethnographic Research. pp. 165–177.
  8. ^ Robertson, Jennifer (1999). Dying to Tell: Sexuality and Suicide in Imperial Japan. Vol.25. The University of Chicago Press. p. 21.
  9. ^ Reichert, Jim. Deviance and Social Darwinism in Edogawa Ranpo's Erotic-Grotesque Thriller "Kotō no oni". Journal of Japanese Studies. Vol. 27. The Society for Japanese Studies. p. 128.
  10. ^ Goichi Matsuzawa (1997). Meiji, Taishō, Shōwa, kindai fūzoku shuppan no rekishi, Ero no hon. Tokyo. Wani no ana. p. 55
  11. ^ Sabine Frühstück (2003). Colonizing Sex: Sexology and Social Control in Modern Japan. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-23548-7. p. 15
  12. ^ Mark McLelland (2006). "A Short History of 'Hentai'". In: Intersections: Gender, History and Culture in the Asian Context. Vol. 12.
  13. ^ Cunningham, Phillip J. (1995). Zakennayo!. Penguin Group. p. 30.
  14. ^ Jonathan Clements, Helen McCarthy: The anime encyclopedia: a guide to Japanese animation since 1917, Edition 2, Stone Bridge Press, 2006, University of California, ISBN 1-933330-10-4, p. 30
  15. ^ Robin E. Brenner: Understanding Manga and Anime. Libraries Unlimited, 2007, ISBN 1-59158-332-2, p. 295
Alice on Deadlines

Alice on Deadlines (Japanese: D線上のアリス, Hepburn: Dī Senjō no Arisu) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Shiro Ihara. The manga was serialized in Square Enix's shōnen magazine, Gangan Wing. Square Enix released the manga's four tankōbon volumes between March 26, 2005 and May 27, 2006. It is licensed in North America by Yen Press, which released the four tankōbon volumes between November 2007 and November 2008.

Call Me Tonight

Call Me Tonight is a 1986 Japanese original video animation erotic horror comedy short film directed by Tatsuya Okamoto. It was released on July 28, 1986.

Cleopatra DC

Cleopatra D.C. (クレオパトラD.C., Kureopatora D.C.) is a manga series by Kaoru Shintani about a fictional United States corporation, led by the beautiful and spirited Cleopatra Corns.

Cleopatra, or Cleo as she's known to her friends, would much rather go on vacation in some exotic locale than concern herself with the business end of the Corns Conglomerate, which is the most powerful economic player in the United States. However, Cleo has a kind and forgiving nature, and will not shy away if trouble is near. And more often than she cares for, Cleo and her friends find themselves in all sorts of fantastic adventures, from putting out oil well fires to safeguarding a powerful telepathic girl.

Futari Ecchi

Futari Ecchi (Japanese: ふたりエッチ, Hepburn: Futari Ecchi) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Katsu Aki. It has been serialized in Young Animal since 1997, with the chapters later combined into tankōbon volumes by Hakusensha, of which to date there are seventy-three. The series follows a newlywed couple in their mid-twenties, both virgins when they married, and chronicles their sexual explorations. The manga combines erotic elements with factual and informative statistics. Its title Futari Ecchi ("two person ecchi") is a play on a slang term for masturbation, hitori ecchi ("single person ecchi"). The series has 29.5 million copies in print and is most famous for being a how-to guide combined into a story.Two spin-off manga have been released, Futari Ecchi for Ladies focusing on the sexuality of women and Futari Ecchi Gaiden: Akira, The Evangelist of Sex focusing on Akira. There are also two sex manuals and an art book. The series was adapted into a three episode live-action television drama that aired on WOWOW in 2000. A four-volume original video animation (OVA) series was produced from 2002 and 2004. In 2011, a twelve-episode live-action web series was streamed on Ustream. Also in 2011, a live-action theatrical film series began. Currently four films have been released. A second three episode OVA series was released in 2014 by Production Reed.

In 2007, the manga series was licensed in North America by Tokyopop as Manga Sutra, only four volumes were released. Also in 2007, Media Blasters licensed and released the OVAs on DVD as Step Up Love Story.

G-On Riders

G-On Riders (G-onらいだーす) is a 2002 magical girl parody anime series. The "G" in "G-On" stands for "Glasses". Every female character in the series (including in one brief shot the Statue of Liberty) wears glasses, hence the title. The character designs are intended to both parody and glorify the meganekko fetish among many anime fans. Other fetishes the anime uses include maids, seifuku, nurses, lolitas, and nuns.

While the original 13 episodes primarily used fan service with nothing actually shown, the OVA included nude scenes of many in the female cast as well as a mock bukkake scene. The OVA was included as a DVD special.

Grenadier (manga)

Grenadier (Japanese: グレネーダー, Hepburn: Gurenēdā) is a manga series written and illustrated by Sōsuke Kaise, published in Kadokawa Shoten's Shōnen Ace in 2003. The manga was licensed in Taiwan by Ever Glory Publishing.The manga was adapted into an animated television series in 2004. The anime series aired on WOWOW from October 14, 2004 to January 13, 2005, totaling twelve episodes.

Haru Natsu Aki Fuyu

Haru Natsu Aki Fuyu (春夏秋冬) is a Japanese erotic romance yuri manga written by Eiki Eiki and illustrated by Taishi Zaou. It was serialized on Yuri Shimai and Comic Yuri Hime and published in a single volume by Ichijinsha. It was published in English on JManga and in French by Taifu Comics. Two drama CDs were also released.

I Dream of Mimi

I Dream of Mimi, known as Buttobi!! CPU (ぶっとび!!CPU, lit. "Blasting Off!! CPU") in Japan, is a Japanese hentai/ecchi series by Kaoru Shintani. It was produced in 1997 by Pink Pineapple studios, with some work farmed out to OLM. It was released in North America by The Right Stuf International under the name I Dream of Mimi. It is based on the 1993 manga "ぶっとび!!CPU" by Kaoru Shintani, published by Hakusensha in Young Animal and as 3 tankoban under the Jets Comics banner.

Imouto Paradise!

Imouto Paradise! Onii-chan to Go nin no Imouto no Ecchi Shimakuri na Mainichi (Japanese: 妹ぱらだいす! 〜お兄ちゃんと5人の妹のエッチしまくりな毎日〜, Hepburn: Imōto Paradaisu! 〜Onii-chan to Go nin no Imouto no Ecchi Shimakuri na Mainichi〜, which roughly translates as "Younger Sister Paradise! Older Brother and Your Five Younger Sisters Dirty Spree Everyday") is a Japanese erotic visual novel developed and published by Moonstone Cherry. Imouto Paradise! was first released on January 28, 2011, playable on Windows as a PC game. On July 29, 2011, M-Trix produced an Android version of Imouto Paradise!, and on September 29, 2011, the game was released as a DVDPG edition by Dennou Club. MangaGamer released an English language localization of the game on August 22, 2014. On May 31, 2013, Moonstone Cherry released a sequel to the first visual novel called Imouto Paradise 2.

Paradigm published a light novel and an adult manga for Imouto Paradise! serialized in the Comic Potpourri Club magazine. A hentai original video animation series was produced.

Kiddy Girl-and

Kiddy GiRL-AND (キディ・ガーランド, Kidi Gārando) is a 2009 sequel to the science fiction anime series Kiddy Grade, created by gímik and Satelight and directed by Keiji Gotoh. The manga adaptation Kiddy Girl-and Pure (キディ・ガーランド ぴゅあ, Kidi Gārando Pyua), illustrated by Yukari Higa, ran in Comp Ace and was released as two collected volumes.

Kyō no Asuka Show

Kyō no Asuka Show (今日のあすかショー, Kyō no Asuka Shō, lit. "Today's Asuka Show") is a Japanese manga series by Taishi Mori. A 20-episode 3-minute web anime series adaptation was released online between August 2012 and January 2013.

Labyrinth of Flames

Labyrinth of Flames (炎のらびりんす, Honō no Labyrinth) is a 2-episode OVA anime series created and produced by Studio Fantasia and directed by Katsuhiko Nishijima. It was released from September 25, 2000 to December 21, 2000. The OVA was licensed by Central Park Media under the U.S. Manga Corps label.

Love Junkies

Love Junkies (恋愛ジャンキー) is an Japanese ecchi comedy manga series written and illustrated by Kyo Hatsuki. It is serialised in Akita Shoten's seinen magazine, Young Champion. The manga is licensed in France by Taifu Comics, in Spain by Norma Editorial and in Brazil by Editora JBC. All publishers other than Akita Shoten release the manga as Love Junkies.

Magical Canan

Magical Canan (まじかるカナン) (also appears as Magical Kanan) is a Japanese magical girl eroge developed and published by Terios. It was later adapted into two erotic OVA series and a 13-episode anime television series. Both OVA series were previously licensed for distribution in North America by NuTech Digital in 2004. Since 2006, the OVAs are licensed by Adult Source Media. The TV series has been licensed for distribution in the Philippines and dubbed in Tagalog by Hero and licensed in Taiwan by Mighty Media Co., Ltd. The game has never been licensed for distribution in North America. The anime television series has been licensed for a North American release by Discotek Media.

Mahoromatic

Mahoromatic (まほろまてぃっく, Mahoromatikku) is a Japanese manga series about a female android former soldier, Mahoro. Driven by guilt from her actions during her combat days, she decides to dedicate the rest of her life to serving the son of her late commander as a maid.

Shotacon

Shotacon (ショタコン, shotakon), short for Shōtarō complex (正太郎コンプレックス, shōtarō konpurekkusu), is Japanese slang describing an attraction to young boys. It refers to a genre of manga and anime wherein pre-pubescent or pubescent male characters are depicted in a suggestive or erotic manner, whether in the obvious role of object of attraction, or the less apparent role of "subject" (the character the reader is designed to associate with). In some stories, the young male character is paired with a male, usually in a homoerotic manner. In others, he is paired with a female, which the general community would call straight shota. It can also apply to postpubescent (adolescent or adult) characters with neotenic features that would make them appear to be younger than they are. The phrase is a reference to the young male character Shōtarō (正太郎) from Tetsujin 28-go (reworked in English as Gigantor). The equivalent term for attraction to (or art pertaining to erotic portrayal of) young girls is lolicon.

The usage of the term in both Western and Japanese fan cultures includes works ranging from explicitly pornographic to mildly suggestive, romantic or in rare cases, entirely nonsexual, in which case it is not usually classified as "true" shotacon. As with lolicon, shotacon is related to the concepts of kawaii (cuteness) and moe (in which characters are presented as young, cute or helpless in order to increase reader identification and inspire protective feelings). As such, shotacon themes and characters are used in a variety of children's media. Elements of shotacon, like yaoi, are comparatively common in shōjo manga, such as the popular translated manga Loveless, which features an eroticized but unconsummated relationship between the 12-year-old male protagonist and a twenty-year-old male, or the young-appearing character Honey in Ouran High School Host Club. seinen manga, primarily aimed at otaku, which also occasionally presents eroticized adolescent males in a non-pornographic context, such as the cross-dressing 16-year-old boy in Yubisaki Milk Tea.

Some critics claim that the shotacon genre contributes to actual sexual abuse of children, while others claim that there is no evidence for this, or that there is evidence to the contrary.

So, I Can't Play H!

So, I Can't Play H! (Japanese: だから僕は、H (エッチ)ができない。, Hepburn: Dakara Boku wa, Ecchi ga Dekinai.), shortened to Boku-H (僕H (エッチ), Boku-Ecchi), is a Japanese light novel series written by Pan Tachibana and illustrated by Yoshiaki Katsurai. The story centers on Ryosuke Kaga, a lecherous high school student who makes a contract with Lisara Restall, a beautiful Grim Reaper, in exchange for his lecherous spirit.

Dakara Boku wa, H ga Dekinai began serialization in Fujimi Shobo's Dragon Magazine in 2010. The series' eleven volumes were released between June 19, 2010, and August 20, 2013. A manga adaptation illustrated by Shou Okagiri began serialization in the May 2011 issue of Monthly Dragon Age, and released five volumes as of December 9, 2013. A 12-episode anime adaptation produced by Feel was announced, and aired from July to September 2012 on AT-X and other networks. The anime series was licensed by Sentai Filmworks in 2013 for distribution in North America. Sentai Filmworks has released the series on DVD, Blu-ray Disc and for online streaming.

Tentacle erotica

Tentacle erotica is a type of pornography most commonly found in Japan which integrates traditional pornography with elements of bestiality and a fantasy, horror, or science-fiction theme. Tentacle rape or shokushu goukan (触手強姦) is found in some horror or hentai titles, with tentacled creatures (usually fictional monsters) having sexual intercourse, predominantly with females. Tentacle erotica can be consensual but frequently contains elements of rape.

The genre is popular enough in Japan that it is the subject of parody. In the 21st century, Japanese films of this genre have become more common in the United States and Europe although it still remains a small, fetish-oriented part of the adult film industry. While most tentacle erotica is animated, there are also a few live-action movies. The genre has also made a minor crossover into the furry fandom.

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