Eastern European Time

Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+02:00 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. The zone uses daylight saving time, so that it uses UTC+03:00 during the summer.

A number of African countries use UTC+02:00 all year long, where it is called Central Africa Time (CAT), although Egypt and Libya also use the term Eastern European Time.

Time zones of Europe
Time in Europe:
light blue Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
blue Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Summer Time / British Summer Time / Irish Standard Time (UTC+1)
red Central European Time (UTC+1)
Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)
yellow Eastern European Time / Kaliningrad Time (UTC+2)
golden Eastern European Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)
light green Further-eastern European Time / Moscow Time / Turkey Time (UTC+3)
Light colours indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colours indicate where a summer time is observed.
UTC hue4map X region Africa
Time zones of Africa:
 -01:00  Cape Verde Time[a]
 ±00:00 
 +01:00 
 +02:00 
 +03:00  East Africa Time
 +04:00 
Light colours indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colours indicate where daylight saving is observed.
a The islands of Cape Verde are to the west of the African mainland.
Time Zones of the Middle East
Time in the Middle East
    UTC+02:00 Eastern European Time
    UTC+02:00

UTC+03:00
Eastern European Time /
Israel Standard Time /
Palestine Standard Time
Eastern European Summer Time /
Israel Summer Time /
Palestine Summer Time
    UTC+03:00 Turkey Time
Arabia Standard Time
    UTC+03:30
UTC+04:30
Iran Standard Time
Iran Daylight Time
    UTC+04:00 Gulf Standard Time
Light colors indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colors indicate where daylight savings is observed.

Usage

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories use Eastern European Time all year round:

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories use Eastern European Time during the winter only:

The following countries, parts of countries, and territories used Eastern European Time in the past:

  • Moscow used EET in years 1922–30 and 1991–92.
  • Belarus, in years 1922–30 and 1990–2011[3]
  • In Poland this time was used in years 1918–22.
  • In time of World War II, Germany implemented MET (CET) in east occupied territories.
  • Republic of Crimea and Sevastopol used EET as part of Ukraine, both are officially recognised as part of Ukraine but occupied by Russia, in years 1991-94 and 1996-2014 - 2014 was the year in which Russia occupied the Ukrainian region of Crimea and Sevastopol.
  • Turkey, used EET in years 1910-1978 and re-used it again in years 1985-2016. Now uses year round DST timezone called Further-eastern European Time or Turkey Time (TRT).

Sometimes, due to its use on Microsoft Windows,[4] FLE Standard Time (for Finland, Lithuania, Estonia,[5] or sometimes Finland, Latvia, Estonia[6]) or GTB Standard Time (for Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria) are used to refer to Eastern European Time.

Anomalies

Since political, in addition to purely geographical, criteria are used in the drawing of time zones, it follows that time zones do not precisely adhere to meridian lines. The EET (UTC+02:00) time zone, were it drawn by purely geographical terms, would consist of exactly the area between meridians 22°30' E and 37°30' E. As a result, there are European locales that despite lying in an area with a "physical" UTC+02:00 time, are in another time zone; likewise, there are European areas that have gone for UTC+02:00, even though their "physical" time zone is different from that. Following is a list of such anomalies:

Areas located outside UTC+02:00 longitudes using Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00) time

Tzdiff-Europe-winter
European winter
Colour Legal time vs local mean time
1 h ± 30 m behind
0 h ± 30 m
1 h ± 30 m ahead
2 h ± 30 m ahead
3 h ± 30 m ahead

Areas west of 22°30' E ("physical" UTC+01:00) that use UTC+02:00

Areas located within UTC+02:00 longitudes (22°30' E – 37°30' E) using other time zones

Areas that use UTC+01:00

These areas have sunrises and sunsets at least half an hour earlier than places on the UTC+01:00 meridian.

Areas that use UTC+03:00

  • Belarus is located between 23°11′E and 32°47′E and is thus fully located with the physical UTC+02:00 area, but it uses UTC+03:00 year around.
  • Practically all European Russia west of Moscow (except Kaliningrad Oblast); this includes the chunk of land from Murmansk all the way south to Belgorod, including the cities of St. Petersburg, Novgorod, and Pskov, to name only a few. (The westernmost point of contiguous Russia, near Lavry, Pskov Oblast, 27°19' E, is the westernmost point in European Russia where UTC+03:00 is applied.) This also includes the city of Anapa, at the westernmost tip of the Krasnodar Krai near the entrance to the Sea of Azov, at 37°22' E.
  • Western Turkey.

Tripoints and borders between zones

  • The Norway–Russia–Finland "tri-zone" point at Muotkavaara (see Central European Time) is surrounded by three different times in winter, two in summer. It had three time zones year-around before 2014.
  • Two of the four tripoints of Belarus and the tripoint of the Kaliningrad Region are surrounded by three different times in winter.

Major metropolitan areas

Winter only

Year round

References

  1. ^ "Saatler geri alınıyor!". Yeni Düzen. Retrieved 18 October 2017.
  2. ^ Ukraine to return to standard time on Oct. 30 (updated) Archived October 18, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "Eternal Daylight Saving Time (DST) in Belarus".
  4. ^ "TimeZone". Microsoft.
  5. ^ "FLE". TheFreeDictionary.com.
  6. ^ "Finland Latvia Estonia Time". TheFreeDictionary.com.
30th meridian east

The meridian 30° east of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Europe, Turkey, Africa, the Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 30th meridian east forms a great circle with the 150th meridian west.

The meridian is the mid point of Eastern European Time.

The 1992 BBC travel documentary Pole to Pole followed Michael Palin's journey along the 30° east meridian, which was selected as his travel axis as it covered the most land.

Central Africa Time

Central Africa Time, or CAT, is a time zone used in central and southern Africa. Central Africa Time is two hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+02:00), which is the same as the adjacent South Africa Standard Time and Eastern European Time (although the latter area uses Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3) most of the year)

As this time zone is in the equatorial and tropical regions, there is little change in day length throughout the year, and so daylight saving time is not observed.

Central Africa Time is used by the following countries:

Burundi

Botswana

Egypt (observes Eastern European Time)

Democratic Republic of the Congo (eastern)

Libya

Malawi

Mozambique

Namibia

Rwanda

Sudan

Zambia

ZimbabweThe following countries use South African Standard Time instead of Central Africa Time:

Lesotho

South Africa

Eswatini

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time (UTC+01:00) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Central European Time

Central European Time (CET), used in most parts of Europe and a few North African countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. The same standard time, UTC+01:00, is also known as Middle European Time (MET, German: MEZ) and under other names like Berlin Time, Warsaw Time and Romance Standard Time (RST), Paris Time or Rome Time.The 15th meridian east is the central axis for UTC+01:00 in the world system of time zones.

As of 2011, all member states of the European Union observe summer time; those that during the winter use CET use Central European Summer Time (CEST) (or: UTC+02:00, daylight saving time) in summer (from last Sunday of March to last Sunday of October).A number of African countries use UTC+01:00 all year long, where it is called West Africa Time (WAT), although Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia also use the term Central European Time.

East Africa Time

East Africa Time, or EAT, is a time zone used in eastern Africa. The time zone is three hours ahead of UTC (UTC+03:00), which is the same as Arabia Standard Time, Further-eastern European Time, Moscow Time and Eastern European Summer Time.As this Time Zone is predominantly in the equatorial region, there is no significant change in day length throughout the year and so daylight saving time is not observed.East Africa Time is used by the following countries:

Comoros

Djibouti

Eritrea

Ethiopia

Kenya

Madagascar

Somalia

South Sudan

Tanzania

Uganda

Eastern European Summer Time

Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+03:00 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used as a summer daylight saving time in some European and Middle Eastern countries, which makes it the same as Arabia Standard Time, East Africa Time and Moscow Time. During the winter periods, Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00) is used.

Since 1996 European Summer Time has been observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October; previously the rules were not uniform across the European Union.

Egypt Standard Time

Egypt Standard Time is UTC+2, which is exactly the same as Eastern European Time, and is co-linear with neighboring Libya and Sudan. Egypt has previously used Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3), during the summer periods from 1957–2010 and 2014–15.

Further-eastern European Time

Further-eastern European Time (FET) is a time zone defined as three hours ahead of UTC (UTC+03:00) without daylight saving time. As of September 2016, it is used in Belarus, western Russia and Turkey, and is also called Minsk Time, Moscow Time (MSK), or Turkey Time (TRT).

The zone was established in October 2011 as the official time for the Kaliningrad Oblast in Russia, and then followed by Belarus. It was originally called Kaliningrad Time in Russia; however, on 26 October 2014, most of Russia moved the UTC offset back one hour meaning that Kaliningrad Time is now UTC+02:00, and Moscow Time is UTC+03:00.

Several African and Middle Eastern countries use UTC+03:00 all year long, where it called East Africa Time (EAT) and Arabia Standard Time (AST).

Greenwich Mean Time

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London, reckoned from midnight. At different times in the past, it has been calculated in different ways, including being calculated from noon; as a consequence, it cannot be used to specify a precise time unless a context is given.

English speakers often use GMT as a synonym for Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). For navigation, it is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); but this meaning can differ from UTC by up to 0.9 s. The term GMT should not thus be used for technical purposes.Because of Earth's uneven speed in its elliptical orbit and its axial tilt, noon (12:00:00) GMT is rarely the exact moment the sun crosses the Greenwich meridian and reaches its highest point in the sky there. This event may occur up to 16 minutes before or after noon GMT, a discrepancy calculated by the equation of time. Noon GMT is the annual average (i.e. "mean") moment of this event, which accounts for the word "mean" in "Greenwich Mean Time".

Originally, astronomers considered a GMT day to start at noon, while for almost everyone else it started at midnight. To avoid confusion, the name Universal Time was introduced to denote GMT as counted from midnight. Astronomers preferred the old convention to simplify their observational data, so that each night was logged under a single calendar date. Today Universal Time usually refers to UTC or UT1.The term "GMT" is especially used by bodies connected with the United Kingdom, such as the BBC World Service, the Royal Navy, the Met Office and others particularly in Arab countries, such as the Middle East Broadcasting Centre and OSN. It is a term commonly used in the United Kingdom and countries of the Commonwealth, including Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Malaysia; and in many other countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

Kaliningrad Time

Kaliningrad Time is the time zone two hours ahead of UTC (UTC+02:00) and 1 hour behind Moscow Time (MSK−1). It is used in Kaliningrad Oblast.

Until 2011, Kaliningrad Time was identical to Eastern European Time (UTC+02:00; UTC+03:00 with daylight saving time). On 27 March 2011, Russia moved to permanent DST, so that clocks would remain on what had been the summer time all year round, making Kaliningrad time permanently set to UTC+03:00. On 26 October 2014, this law was reversed, but daylight saving time was not reintroduced, so Kaliningrad is now permanently set to UTC+02:00.Main cities:

Kaliningrad

Sovetsk

Chernyakhovsk

Time in Turkey

Time in Turkey is given by UTC+03:00 year-round. This time is also called Turkey Time (TRT) or Türkiye Saati İle (TSİ). The time is currently same as in the Arabia Standard Time, Further-eastern European Time and Moscow Time zone. Turkey Time was adopted by the Turkish government on September 8, 2016. It was also in use in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus until it reverted to EET in October 2017.

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