Eastern Conference (NBA)

The Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA) is one of two conferences that makes up the league, the other being the Western Conference. Like the Western Conference, the Eastern Conference is made up of 15 teams, organized in three divisions.

The current divisional alignment was adopted at the start of the 2004–05 season, when the now Charlotte Hornets began play as the NBA's 30th franchise. This necessitated the move of the New Orleans Pelicans from the Eastern Conference's Central Division to the newly created Southwest Division of the Western Conference.

Eastern Conference
Eastern Conference (NBA) logo 2018
LeagueNational Basketball Association
SportBasketball
FormerlyEastern Division (1946–1970)
Founded1970
Teams
No. of teams15
Championships
Most recent Eastern Conference champion(s)Cleveland Cavaliers
(5th title)
Most Eastern Conference titlesBoston Celtics
(21 titles)

Current standings

Eastern Conference
# Team W L PCT GB GP
1 zMilwaukee Bucks * 60 22 .732 82
2 yToronto Raptors * 58 24 .707 2.0 82
3 xPhiladelphia 76ers 51 31 .622 9.0 82
4 xBoston Celtics 49 33 .598 11.0 82
5 xIndiana Pacers 48 34 .585 12.0 82
6 xBrooklyn Nets 42 40 .512 18.0 82
7 yOrlando Magic * 42 40 .512 18.0 82
8 xDetroit Pistons 41 41 .500 19.0 82
9 Charlotte Hornets 39 43 .476 21.0 82
10 Miami Heat 39 43 .476 21.0 82
11 Washington Wizards 32 50 .390 28.0 82
12 Atlanta Hawks 29 53 .354 31.0 82
13 Chicago Bulls 22 60 .268 38.0 82
14 Cleveland Cavaliers 19 63 .232 41.0 82
15 New York Knicks 17 65 .207 43.0 82

Notes

  • z – Clinched home court advantage for the entire playoffs
  • c – Clinched home court advantage for the conference playoffs
  • y – Clinched division title
  • x – Clinched playoff spot
  • * – Division leader

Teams

Team Division Location Year From
Joined
Atlanta Hawks Southeast Atlanta, Georgia 1968–present Western Division
Boston Celtics Atlantic Boston, Massachusetts 1946–present
Brooklyn Nets Atlantic Brooklyn, New York 1976–present ABAdouble-dagger
Charlotte Hornets Southeast Charlotte, North Carolina 19882002; 2004–present  —dagger
Chicago Bulls Central Chicago, Illinois 1980–present Western Conference
Cleveland Cavaliers Central Cleveland, Ohio 1970–present  —dagger
Detroit Pistons Central Detroit, Michigan 19671970; 1978–present Western Division
Indiana Pacers Central Indianapolis, Indiana 1979–present Western Conference
Miami Heat Southeast Miami, Florida 1989–present Western Conference
Milwaukee Bucks Central Milwaukee, Wisconsin 19681970; 1980–present  —dagger; Western Conference
New York Knicks Atlantic Manhattan, New York 1946–present
Orlando Magic Southeast Orlando, Florida 19891990; 1991–present  —dagger; Western Conference
Philadelphia 76ers Atlantic Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1949–present  —*
Toronto Raptors Atlantic Toronto, Ontario 1995–present  —dagger
Washington Wizards Southeast Washington, D.C. 1961–present Western Division

Former teams

Team Location Year From Year To Current conference
Joined Left
Baltimore Bullets Baltimore, Maryland 1948 Western Division 1954[1] Defunct Defunct
Buffalo Braves (now the Los Angeles Clippers) Buffalo, New York 1970  —dagger 1978 Western Conference Western Conference
Cincinnati Royals (now the Sacramento Kings) Cincinnati, Ohio 1962 Western Division 1972 Western Conference Western Conference
Houston Rockets Houston, Texas 1972 Western Conference 1980 Western Conference Western Conference
New Orleans Jazz (now the Utah Jazz) New Orleans, Louisiana 1974  —dagger 1979 Western Conference Western Conference
New Orleans Hornets (now the New Orleans Pelicans) New Orleans, Louisiana 2002  —dagger 2004 Western Conference Western Conference
Philadelphia Warriors (now the Golden State Warriors) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1946 1962 Western Division Western Conference
Providence Steamrollers Providence, Rhode Island 1946 1949 Defunct Defunct
San Antonio Spurs San Antonio, Texas 1976 ABAdouble-dagger 1980 Western Conference Western Conference
Toronto Huskies Toronto, Ontario 1946 1947 Defunct Defunct
Washington Capitols Washington, D.C. 1946
1948
Western Division 1947
1951[2]
Western Division
Defunct
Defunct
Notes

Team timeline

Denotes team that currently in the conference
Denotes team that has left the conference

Eastern Conference champions

Eastern Conference was named Eastern Division until 1970
Bold Winning team of the BAA Finals or NBA Finals
^ Had or tied for the best regular season record for that season
Season Team Record Finals result
1946–47 Philadelphia Warriors 35–25 Won BAA Finals 4–1
1947–48 Philadelphia Warriors 27–21 Lost BAA Finals 2–4
1948–49 Washington Capitols 38–22 Lost BAA Finals 2–4
1949–50 Syracuse Nationals 51–13^ Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1950–51 New York Knicks 36–30 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1951–52 New York Knicks 37–29 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1952–53 New York Knicks 47–23 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1953–54 Syracuse Nationals 42–30 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1954–55 Syracuse Nationals 43–29^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1955–56 Philadelphia Warriors 45–27^ Won NBA Finals 4–1
1956–57 Boston Celtics 44–28^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1957–58 Boston Celtics 49–23^ Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1958–59 Boston Celtics 52–20^ Won NBA Finals 4–0
1959–60 Boston Celtics 59–16^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1960–61 Boston Celtics 57–22^ Won NBA Finals 4–1
1961–62 Boston Celtics 60–20^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1962–63 Boston Celtics 58–22^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1963–64 Boston Celtics 59–21^ Won NBA Finals 4–1
1964–65 Boston Celtics 62–18^ Won NBA Finals 4–1
1965–66 Boston Celtics 54–26 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1966–67 Philadelphia 76ers 68–13^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1967–68 Boston Celtics 54–28 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1968–69 Boston Celtics 48–34 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1969–70 New York Knicks 60–22^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1970–71 Baltimore Bullets 42–40 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1971–72 New York Knicks 48–34 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1972–73 New York Knicks 57–25 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1973–74 Boston Celtics 56–26 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1974–75 Washington Bullets 60–22^ Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1975–76 Boston Celtics 54–28 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1976–77 Philadelphia 76ers 50–32 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1977–78 Washington Bullets 44–38 Won NBA Finals 4–3
1978–79 Washington Bullets 54–28^ Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1979–80 Philadelphia 76ers 59–23 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1980–81 Boston Celtics 62–20^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1981–82 Philadelphia 76ers 58–24 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1982–83 Philadelphia 76ers 65–17^ Won NBA Finals 4–0
1983–84 Boston Celtics 62–20^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
1984–85 Boston Celtics 63–19^ Lost NBA Finals 4–2
1985–86 Boston Celtics 67–15^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1986–87 Boston Celtics 59–23 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
1987–88 Detroit Pistons 54–28 Lost NBA Finals 4–3
1988–89 Detroit Pistons 63–19^ Won NBA Finals 4–0
1989–90 Detroit Pistons 59–23 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1990–91 Chicago Bulls 61–21 Won NBA Finals 4–1
1991–92 Chicago Bulls 67–15^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1992–93 Chicago Bulls 57–25 Won NBA Finals 4–2
1993–94 New York Knicks 57–25 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
1994–95 Orlando Magic 57–25 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
1995–96 Chicago Bulls 72–10^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1996–97 Chicago Bulls 69–13^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1997–98 Chicago Bulls 62–20^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
1998–99 New York Knicks 27–23 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
1999–2000 Indiana Pacers 56–26 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2000–01 Philadelphia 76ers 56–26 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
2001–02 New Jersey Nets 52–30 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
2002–03 New Jersey Nets 49–33 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2003–04 Detroit Pistons 54–28 Won NBA Finals 4–1
2004–05 Detroit Pistons 54–28 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
2005–06 Miami Heat 52–30 Won NBA Finals 4–2
2006–07 Cleveland Cavaliers 50–32 Lost NBA Finals 0–4
2007–08 Boston Celtics 66–16^ Won NBA Finals 4–2
2008–09 Orlando Magic 59–23 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
2009–10 Boston Celtics 50–32 Lost NBA Finals 3–4
2010–11 Miami Heat 58–24 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2011–12 Miami Heat 46–20 Won NBA Finals 4–1
2012–13 Miami Heat 66–16^ Won NBA Finals 4–3
2013–14 Miami Heat 54–28 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
2014–15 Cleveland Cavaliers 53–29 Lost NBA Finals 2–4
2015–16 Cleveland Cavaliers 57–25 Won NBA Finals 4–3
2016–17 Cleveland Cavaliers 51–31 Lost NBA Finals 1–4
2017–18 Cleveland Cavaliers 50–32 Lost NBA Finals 0–4

List of Eastern Conference teams with the most conference championships

Season results

Legend
^ Denotes team that won the NBA Finals
+ Denotes team that won the Conference Finals, but lost the NBA Finals
* Denotes team that qualified for the NBA Playoffs

References

  1. ^ The Bullets played 14 games during the 1954–55 season before becoming defunct.
  2. ^ The Capitols played 35 games during the 1950–51 season before becoming defunct.
1946–47 Philadelphia Warriors season

The 1946–47 BAA season was the first season of the Philadelphia Warriors in the BAA (which later became the NBA). The Warriors finished the season winning their first Championship.

1953–54 Syracuse Nationals season

The 1953-54 Syracuse Nationals season was the fifth season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). In the Eastern Division Finals the Nationals swept the Boston Celtics two straight to make it to the NBA Finals. The Nationals would go on to lose the Finals in seven games to the Minneapolis Lakers.

1954–55 Syracuse Nationals season

During the 1954-55 Syracuse Nationals season the National Basketball Association (NBA) was struggling financially and down to just 8 teams, Nationals owner Danny Biasone suggested that the league limit the amount of time taken for a shot. Biasone was upset with the stalling tactics of opposing teams. During the summer of 1954, Biasone had gotten together some of his pros and a group of high school players and timed them with a stopwatch. Most shots were taken within 12 seconds, Biasone discovered. Biasone calculated that a 24-second shot clock would allow at least 30 shots per quarter and assist in increasing scoring. The result would speed up a game that often ended with long periods of teams just holding the ball. Quickness and athletic ability became prized as they never had been before. Excessive fouling didn't disappear completely, but just about everyone concluded that the clock was good for the game. The shot clock was a success with the result that scoring was up 14 points per game league wide. In the first season of the shot clock, the Nats would take first place in the Eastern Division with a 43–29 record.

1955–56 Philadelphia Warriors season

The 1955-56 Philadelphia Warriors season George Senesky took over for Eddie Gottlieb as coach, the Warriors had a strong start by winning 12 of their first 16 games. Paul Arizin and Neil Johnston were among the league's scoring leaders as the Warriors won the Eastern Division with a 45–27 record. The addition of rookie Tom Gola made the difference. In his first season Gola averaged 9.1 rebounds and 5.9 assists per game. In the Eastern Division Finals the Warriors beat the Syracuse Nationals in 5 games. In the NBA Finals, the Warriors won their 2nd Championship by beating the Fort Wayne Pistons 4 games to 1.

1956–57 Boston Celtics season

The 1956–57 Boston Celtics season was the 11th season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Celtics finished the season by winning their first NBA Championship.

1957–58 Boston Celtics season

The 1957–58 Boston Celtics season was the 12th season for the Celtics in the NBA.

1958–59 Boston Celtics season

The 1958–59 Boston Celtics season was the 13th season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Celtics finished the season by winning their second NBA Championship.

1959–60 Boston Celtics season

The 1959–60 Boston Celtics season was the 14th season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Celtics finished the season by winning their third NBA Championship.

1960–61 Boston Celtics season

The 1960–61 Boston Celtics season was the 15th season for the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The Celtics finished the season by winning their fourth NBA Championship.

1961–62 Boston Celtics season

The 1961–62 NBA season was the Celtics' 16th season in the NBA. The Celtics finished the season by winning their fifth NBA Championship.

1962–63 Boston Celtics season

The 1962–63 NBA season was the Celtics' 17th season in the NBA. The Celtics finished the season by winning their sixth NBA Championship.

1963–64 Boston Celtics season

The 1963–64 NBA season was the Celtics' 18th season in the NBA. The Celtics finished the season by winning their seventh NBA Championship.

1964–65 Boston Celtics season

The 1964–65 NBA season was the Celtics' 19th season in the NBA. The Celtics finished the season by winning their eighth NBA Championship, defeating the Los Angeles Lakers in five games. The team was named one of the 10 greatest teams in NBA history. In addition five players were inducted into the Hall of Fame - K.C. Jones, Sam Jones, Tom Heinsohn, Bill Russell, and John Havlicek. Sam Jones, Havlicek, and Russell were selected as among the NBA's 50 greatest players. Both Red Auerbach and John Thompson were elected into the Hall of Fame as coaches.

1967–68 Boston Celtics season

The 1967–68 Boston Celtics season was their 22nd in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

1968–69 Boston Celtics season

The 1968–69 Boston Celtics season was their 23rd season of the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

1973–74 Boston Celtics season

The 1973–74 Boston Celtics season was their 28th in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

1974–75 Washington Bullets season

The 1974–75 Washington Bullets played in their 14th season. The franchise changed their name from the Capital Bullets to the Washington Bullets. The franchise captured its 6th division title in 7 years by posting a franchise best record of 60–22. The Bullets were nearly unbeatable at home posting a record of 36–5 at the Capital Centre. The Bullets won their second Eastern Conference title, but were swept in the NBA Finals in four games by the Golden State Warriors.

1975–76 Boston Celtics season

The 1975–76 Boston Celtics season was their 30th in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and concluded with their 13th championship, defeating the Phoenix Suns in six games in the 1976 NBA Finals.

List of NBA champions

The National Basketball Association (NBA) (formerly Basketball Association of America (BAA) from 1946 to 1949) Finals is the championship series for the NBA and the conclusion of the NBA's postseason. All Finals have been played in a best-of-seven format, and contested between the winners of the Eastern Conference and the Western Conference (formerly Divisions before 1970), except in 1950 in which the Eastern Division champion faced the winner between the Western and Central Division champions. Prior to 1949, the playoffs were instituted a three-stage tournament where the two semifinal winners played each other in the finals. The winning team of the series receives the Larry O'Brien Championship Trophy.

The home-and-away format in the NBA Finals is in a 2–2–1–1–1 format (the team with the better regular season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 5 and 7) during 1947–1948, 1950–1952, 1957–1970, 1972–1974, 1976–1977, 1979–1984, 2014–present. It was previously in a 2–3–2 format (the team with the better regular season record plays on their home court in Games 1, 2, 6 and 7) during 1949, 1953–1955, and 1985–2013, in a 1–1–1–1–1–1–1 format during 1956 and 1971 and in a 1–2–2–1–1 format during 1975 and 1978.The Eastern Conference/Division leads the Western Conference/Division in series won (38–32). The Boston Celtics and the Minneapolis/Los Angeles Lakers alone own almost half of the titles, having won a combined 33 of 72 championships.

EasternConference
Western
Conference
Annual events
History
Personalities
Awards and honors
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