Eastern Canada

Eastern Canada (also the Eastern provinces) is generally considered to be the region of Canada east of Manitoba, consisting of the following provinces:

Ontario and Quebec define Central Canada, while the other provinces constitute Atlantic Canada. New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island are also known as the Maritime Provinces.[1]

Eastern Canada
Region
Eastern Canada (green) within the rest of Canada (tan)
Eastern Canada (green) within the rest of Canada (tan)
Country Canada
ProvincesNew Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec
Area
 • Total2,783,400 km2 (1,074,700 sq mi)
Population
(2016)
 • Total23,946,177
 • Density8.6/km2 (22/sq mi)

Capitals

Ottawa, Canada's capital, is located in Eastern Canada, within the province of Ontario.

The capitals of the provinces are in the list below:

Definitions

The Canadian Press defines Eastern Canada as everything east of and including Thunder Bay, Ontario.[2]

Population

The total population of this region is about 23,946,177 in 2016, or about 70% of Canada's population. Most of the population resides in Ontario and Quebec. The region contains 3 of Canada's 5 largest metropolitan areas, Toronto being the fourth largest municipality in North America.

Largest metropolitan areas

The population of each province in 2016, from greatest to least is here:

Politics

Eastern Canada is represented by 213 Members of Parliament (106 in Ontario, 75 in Quebec, and 32 in the Atlantic Provinces) and 78 senators.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Maritime Provinces". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  2. ^ Canadian Press Style Guide. Canadian Press. 1995. p.471

Coordinates: 47°11′22.96″N 70°8′12.19″W / 47.1897111°N 70.1367194°W

External links

Media related to Eastern Canada at Wikimedia Commons The dictionary definition of Eastern Canada at Wiktionary

1909 ECHA season

The 1909 ECHA season was the fourth and final season of the Eastern Canada Hockey Association (ECHA). Teams played a twelve-game schedule. The Ottawa Senators would win the league championship with a record of ten wins, two losses and take over the Stanley Cup.

Acer saccharinum

Acer saccharinum, commonly known as silver maple, creek maple, silverleaf maple, soft maple, large maple, water maple, swamp maple, or white maple—is a species of maple native to the eastern and central United States and southeastern Canada. It is one of the most common trees in the United States.

Although the silver maple‘s Latin name is similar, it should not be confused with Acer saccharum, the sugar maple. Some of the common names are also applied to other maples, especially Acer rubrum.

Atlantic Canada

Atlantic Canada, also called the Atlantic provinces, is the region of Canada comprising the four provinces located on the Atlantic coast, excluding Quebec: the three Maritime provinces – New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island – and the easternmost province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The population of the four Atlantic provinces in 2016 was about 2,300,000 on half a million km2. The provinces combined had an approximate GDP of $121.888 billion in 2011.

Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association

The Eastern Canada Amateur Hockey Association (ECAHA) was a men's amateur – later professional – ice hockey league in Canada that played four seasons. It was founded on December 11, 1905 with the top clubs from two other leagues: four from the Canadian Amateur Hockey League (CAHL) and two from the Federal Amateur Hockey League (FAHL). It was formed to maximize the revenues of a now popular spectator sport and help these amateur teams cope with professionalism in the sport. The league would shed its amateur status for the 1908 season, leading to the split between Canadian amateur ice hockey teams playing for the Allan Cup, and the professionals playing for the Stanley Cup. The league would itself dissolve in 1909 over a dispute between team owners over business issues.

Eastern Canada Cup Challenge

The Eastern Canada Cup Challenge (ECCC) is a Canadian Junior ice hockey mid-season prospects tournament, featuring All-star teams from Canadian Junior Hockey League and Hockey Canada-sanctioned Junior A leagues from across Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces. It was founded in 2011 as the Central Canada Cup Challenge (CCCC).

Eastern Canada Professional Soccer League

The Eastern Canada Professional Soccer League was a soccer league in Canada. The league operated for six seasons from 1961 to 1966 across four cities in two Canadian provinces and one American state. In the 1960s, the Eastern Canada Professional Soccer League was one of four major leagues in Canadian soccer alongside the Pacific Coast League, the Western Canada Soccer League, and the National Soccer League of Ontario/Quebec.The league was founded in 1961 by George Gross and Peter Bosa. According to Gross, the genesis for the league was formed from a conversation the two men had during the Christmas 1960 holidays. Bosa promised the inclusion of his club Toronto Italia (champions of the National Soccer League) and arranged for the inclusion of the Hamilton Steelers (backed by John Agro and Arnold Martini); Gross helped form Toronto City FC (with Ed Fitkin, Steve Stavro and Laddie Myslivec) and arranged for the inclusion of Montréal Cantalia FC (run by Dr. Ernest Stastny).

The league was officially launched on 30 March 1961 at a press conference in Toronto with Sarto Marchand the league's first president and William Simpson as the league's secretary. Harold Ballard, initially the league's executive vice-president, succeeded Marchand as league president and held the position until March 1964. Simpson thereafter served as league president (1964) and then Chairman (1965 and 1966). After six seasons, the Eastern Canada Professional Soccer League amalgamated with the National Soccer League on 20 December 1966.

The league typically operated from May to September, which initially allowed Canadian clubs to sign European-based players for the summer season. In the first year, stars like Danny Blanchflower, Stanley Matthews and Johnny Haynes all joined the new league for part of the 1961 summer season, then returned to England for the 1961-62 Football League season. The practice proved unpopular with European clubs, prompting British clubs to ban their players from traveling to Canada to join the rival league. On 19 April 1962, FIFA ruled that players could not switch clubs without a proper transfer.

Eastern Time Zone

The Eastern Time Zone (ET) is a time zone encompassing part or all of 22 states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States, parts of eastern Canada, the state of Quintana Roo in Mexico, Panama in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands.

Places that use Eastern Standard Time (EST) when observing standard time (autumn/winter) are 5 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−05:00).

Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), when observing daylight saving time DST (spring/summer) is 4 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−04:00).

In the northern parts of the time zone, on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. EST, clocks are advanced to 3:00 a.m. EDT leaving a one-hour "gap". On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00 a.m. EDT, clocks are moved back to 1:00 a.m. EST, thus "duplicating" one hour. Southern parts of the zone (Panama and the Caribbean) do not observe daylight saving time.

Fagus grandifolia

Fagus grandifolia, the American beech or North American beech, is the species of beech tree native to the eastern United States and extreme southeast Canada.

The genus name Fagus is Latin for "beech", and the specific epithet grandifolia comes from grandis "large" and folium "leaf".

Great Lakes region

The Great Lakes region of North America is a bi-national Canadian–American region that includes portions of the eight U.S. states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as well as the Canadian province of Ontario. The region centers on the Great Lakes and forms a distinctive historical, economic, and cultural identity. A portion of the region also encompasses the Great Lakes Megalopolis.

The Great Lakes Commission, authorized by the region's American states and Province of Ontario, and the additional Canadian Province of Quebec, comprises a bi-national authority with specified powers to protect and preserve the water and environmental resources of the Great Lakes and surrounding waterways and aquifers. The Commission's authorities are confirmed by the Canadian and American federal governments, and by its constituent states and provinces. The states and provinces are represented in the Conference of Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers.

The Great Lakes region takes its name from the corresponding geological formation of the Great Lakes Basin, a narrow watershed encompassing The Great Lakes, bounded by watersheds to the region's north (Hudson Bay), west (Mississippi), east and south (Ohio). To the east, the rivers of St. Lawrence, Richelieu, Hudson, Mohawk and Susquehanna form an arc of watersheds east to The Atlantic.

The Great Lakes region, as distinct from the Great Lakes Basin, defines a unit of sub-national political entities defined by the U.S. states and the Canadian Province of Ontario encompassing the Great Lakes watershed, and the states and Province bordering one or more of the Great Lakes.

Juglans cinerea

Juglans cinerea, commonly known as butternut or white walnut, is a species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada.

Leach's storm petrel

The Leach's storm petrel or Leach's petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) is a small seabird of the tubenose order. It is named after the British zoologist William Elford Leach. The scientific name is derived from Ancient Greek. Oceanodroma is from okeanos, "ocean" and dromos, "runner", and leucorhoa is from leukos, "white" and orrhos, "rump".It breeds on inaccessible islands in the colder northern areas of the Atlantic and Pacific. It nests in colonies close to the sea in well concealed areas such as rock crevices, shallow burrows or even logs. It lays a single white egg which often has a faint ring of spots at the large end. This storm petrel is strictly nocturnal at the breeding sites to avoid predation by gulls and skuas, and will even avoid coming to land on clear moonlit nights. The largest colony of Leach's storm petrels can be found on Baccalieu Island of eastern Canada, an ecological reserve with more than 3 million pairs of the bird.

Northern cardinal

The northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as the redbird, common cardinal or just cardinal (which was its name prior to 1985). It can be found in southern eastern Canada, through the eastern United States from Maine to Minnesota to Texas, and south through Mexico, Belize, Guatemala and Big Island of Hawai’i. Its habitat includes woodlands, gardens, shrublands, and wetlands.

The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21–23 cm (8.3–9.1 in). It has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a reddish olive color. The northern cardinal is mainly granivorous, but also feeds on insects and fruit. The male behaves territorially, marking out his territory with song. During courtship, the male feeds seed to the female beak-to-beak. A clutch of three to four eggs is laid, and two to four clutches are produced each year. It was once prized as a pet, but its sale as a cage bird was banned in the United States by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.

Pinus resinosa

Pinus resinosa, known as red pine or Norway pine, is a pine native to North America. It occurs from Newfoundland west to Manitoba, and south to Pennsylvania, with several smaller, disjunct populations occurring in the Appalachian Mountains in Virginia and West Virginia, as well as a few small pockets in extreme northern New Jersey and northern Illinois.The red pine is the state tree of Minnesota.

Populus deltoides

Populus deltoides, the eastern cottonwood or necklace poplar, is a cottonwood poplar native to North America, growing throughout the eastern, central, and southwestern United States, the southernmost part of eastern Canada, and northeastern Mexico.

Thuja occidentalis

Thuja occidentalis, also known as northern white-cedar or eastern arborvitae, is an evergreen coniferous tree, in the cypress family Cupressaceae, which is native to eastern Canada and much of the north, central and upper Northeastern United States, but widely cultivated as an ornamental plant. The species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1753, and the binomial name remains current.

Toronto City

Toronto City was a Canadian soccer team based in Toronto, Ontario. Between 1961 and 1967, teams using this name competed in both the Eastern Canada Professional Soccer League and the United Soccer Association.

Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Toronto

The Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Toronto and Eastern Canada is a Ukrainian Catholic (Byzantine Rite in Ukrainian language) eparchy (Eastern Catholic diocese) in the Eastern part of Canada.

It is a suffragan in the ecclesiastical province of the Metropolitan Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg. Its cathedral episcopal see is St. Josaphat’s Cathedral, in Toronto, Ontario but there is also a National Shrine: St. John the Baptist Ukrainian Catholic National Shrine, in Ottawa, Ontario. The current eparch (bishop) is Stephen Chmilar.

Vaccinium corymbosum

Vaccinium corymbosum, the northern highbush blueberry, is a North American species of blueberry which has become a food crop of significant economic importance. It is native to eastern Canada and the eastern and southern United States, from Ontario east to Nova Scotia and south as far as Florida and eastern Texas. It is also naturalized in other places: Europe, Japan, New Zealand, the Pacific Northwest of North America, etc. Other common names include blue huckleberry, tall huckleberry, swamp huckleberry, high blueberry, and swamp blueberry.

Volcanology of Eastern Canada

The volcanology of Eastern Canada includes the hundreds of volcanic areas and extensive lava formations in Eastern Canada. The region's different volcano and lava types originate from different tectonic settings and types of volcanic eruptions, ranging from passive lava eruptions to violent explosive eruptions. Eastern Canada has very large volumes of magmatic rock called large igneous provinces. They are represented by deep-level plumbing systems consisting of giant dike swarms, sill provinces and layered intrusions. The most capable large igneous provinces in Eastern Canada are Archean (3,800-2,500 million years ago) age greenstone belts containing a rare volcanic rock called komatiite.

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