East–West All-Star Game

The East–West All-Star Game was an annual all-star game for Negro league baseball players. The game was the brainchild of Gus Greenlee, owner of the Pittsburgh Crawfords. In 1933 he decided to match the Major League Baseball All-Star Game with Negro league players. Newspaper balloting was set up to allow the fans to choose the starting lineups for that first game, a tradition that continued through the series' end in 1962. Unlike the white All-Star game which is played near the middle of the season, the Negro All-Star game was held toward the end of the season.

Because league structures were shaky during the Great Depression and also because certain teams (notably the Kansas City Monarchs and the Homestead Grays) sometimes played entirely independent of the leagues, votes were not counted by league, but by geographical location. Hence, the games were known as the East-West All-Star Games. Votes were tallied by two of the major African-American weekly newspapers of the day, the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier.

The Games

All games were held at Comiskey Park in Chicago unless otherwise noted.

1933–1939

September 10, 1933
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 2 7 11 3
West 0 0 1 3 0 3 3 1 x 11 15 3
WP: Bill Foster (Chicago American Giants)   LP: Sam Streeter (Pittsburgh Crawfords)
Home runs:
East: None
West: Mule Suttles (Chicago American Giants)
Attendance: 19,568
  • Batteries:
  • Notes:
    • Bill Foster pitched a complete game for the West and Mule Suttles hit the first home run in East-West history.
    • The West squad used only its nine starters for the entire game.
    • The starting lineups reflected an imbalance in voting, as seven West starters came from the American Giants while five East starters were from either the Crawfords or Grays.
    • East first baseman Oscar Charleston (Pittsburgh Crawfords) received the most votes, with 43,793.
August 26, 1934
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 8 1
West 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1
WP: Satchel Paige (Pittsburgh Crawfords)   LP: Bill Foster (Chicago American Giants)
Home runs:
East: None
West: None
Attendance: 30,000 (est.)
  • Batteries:
    • East: Slim Jones (Philadelphia Stars), Harry Kincannon (Pittsburgh Crawfords), Satchel Paige (Pittsburgh Crawfords) (W) and Bill Perkins (Pittsburgh Crawfords)
    • West: Ted Trent (Chicago American Giants), Chet Brewer (Kansas City Monarchs), Bill Foster (Chicago American Giants) (L) and Larry Brown (Chicago American Giants)
  • Notes:
    • Three East pitchers combined on a 7-hit shutout.
    • Cool Papa Bell scored the only run in the eighth.
    • West pitcher Bill Foster received the most votes, 48,957.
August 11, 1935
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
East 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 8 11 5
West 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 4 3 11 11 5
WP: Sug Cornelius (Chicago American Giants)   LP: Martín Dihigo (New York Cubans)
Home runs:
East: Slim Jones (Philadelphia Stars)
West: Mule Suttles (Chicago American Giants)
Attendance: 25,000 (est.)
August 23, 1936
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 2 0 0 1 3 0 2 2 0 10 13 5
West 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 8 2
WP: Leroy Matlock (Pittsburgh Crawfords)   LP: Sug Cornelius (Chicago American Giants)
Home runs:
East: None
West: None
Attendance: 26,400
  • Batteries:
    • East: Leroy Matlock (Pittsburgh Crawfords) (W), Bill Byrd (Washington Elite Giants), Satchel Paige (Pittsburgh Crawfords) and Biz Mackey (Washington Elite Giants), Josh Gibson (Pittsburgh Crawfords)
    • West: Sug Cornelius (Chicago American Giants) (L), Floyd Kranson (Kansas City Monarchs), Andy Cooper (Kansas City Monarchs), Ted Trent (Chicago American Giants) and Harry Else (Kansas City Monarchs), Subby Byas (Chicago American Giants)
  • Notes:
    • East pitcher Satchel Paige received the most votes, with 18,275
August 8, 1937
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 7 11 1
West 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 4
WP: Barney Morris (Pittsburgh Crawfords)   LP: Hilton Smith (Kansas City Monarchs)
Home runs:
East: Buck Leonard (Homestead Grays)
West: Ted Strong (Indianapolis Athletics)
Attendance: 25,000 (est.)
  • The Western teams played a second All-Star game amongst themselves in Memphis on August 29, and split into North-South alignment. The northern teams won 10–7, with Bill Foster of Chicago getting the win and Ted Strong on Indianapolis homering (while hitting for the cycle).
August 21, 1938
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 11 0
West 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 x 5 9 1
WP: Hilton Smith (Kansas City Monarchs)   LP: Edsall Walker (Homestead Grays)
Home runs:
East: None
West: Neal Robinson (Memphis Red Sox)
Attendance: 30,000 (est.)
August 6, 1939 (first game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 0
West 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 x 4 8 1
WP: Ted Radcliffe (Chicago American Giants)   LP: Roy Partlow (Washington Homestead Grays)
Home runs:
East: None
West: Neal Robinson (Memphis Red Sox), Ted Strong (Kansas City Monarchs)
Attendance: 40,000 (est.)
August 27, 1939 at New York City (second game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
West 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 7  
East 1 4 0 0 1 0 0 4 x 10 13  
WP: Bill Byrd (Baltimore Elite Giants)   LP: Smoky Owens (Cleveland Bears)
Home runs:
West: None
East: None
Attendance: 20,000 (est.)

1940–1949

August 18, 1940
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 2 0 0 1 1 4 0 3 0 11 12 0
West 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6
WP: Henry McHenry (Philadelphia Stars)   LP: Gene Bremer (Memphis Red Sox)
Attendance: 25,000 (est.)
July 27, 1941
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 2 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 8 11 4
West 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 8 5
WP: Dave Barnhill (New York Cubans)   LP: Ted Radcliffe (Memphis Red Sox)
Home runs:
East: Buck Leonard (Washington Homestead Grays)
West: None
Attendance: 50,246
August 16, 1942
(first game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 5 11 2
West 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 2
WP: Leon Day (Newark Eagles)   LP: Satchel Paige (Kansas City Monarchs)
Attendance: 45,179
August 18, 1942 at Cleveland, OH
(second game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 5 0 1 1 0 1 1 9 13 3
West 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 9 0
WP: Felix Evans   LP: Bill Byrd (Baltimore Elite Giants)
Attendance: 10,791
August 1, 1943
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 0
West 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 x 2 6 0
WP: Satchel Paige (Memphis Red Sox)   LP: Dave Barnhill (New York Cubans)
Home runs:
East: Buck Leonard (Washington Homestead Grays)
West: None
Attendance: 51,723
August 13, 1944
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 4 11 2
West 1 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 x 7 12 0
WP: Gentry Jessup (Chicago American Giants)   LP: Carranza Howard (New York Cubans)
Home runs:
East: None
West: Ted Radcliffe (Birmingham Black Barons)
Attendance: 46,247
  • Ted Radcliffe and his brother Alec contributed a home run and triple, respectively, and won $700 bonuses each, which they gave to their mother.
  • The game was nearly cancelled due to a player strike, as the owners upped the players' individual share from $60 to $150 before the game could go on.
July 29, 1945
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 6 10 1
West 0 4 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 12 1
WP: Verdell Mathis (Memphis Red Sox)   LP: Tom Glover (Baltimore Elite Giants)
Home runs:
East: None
West: None
Attendance: 33,088
August 15,1946 at Griffith Stadium, Washington, D.C.
(first game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
West 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 0
East 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 x 6 10 1
WP: Bill Byrd (Baltimore Elite Giants)   LP: Webbo Clarke (Cleveland Buckeyes)
Attendance: 16,268
Notes: This was the first East-West game in Washington, DC, and the first East-West game with no extra-base hits.
August 18, 1946
(second game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4 3
West 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 x 4 7 1
WP: Felix Evans   LP: Bill Byrd (Baltimore Elite Giants)
Attendance: 45,474
  • The Western teams played another All-Star game amongst themselves in September, and split into North-South alignment of Chicago and Cleveland versus Birmingham and Memphis. The northern teams won 8–2.
July 27, 1947
(first game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 0
West 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 x 5 12 1
WP: Dan Bankhead (Memphis Red Sox)   LP: Max Manning (Newark Eagles)
Attendance: 48,112
July 29, 1947 at Polo Grounds, New York, NY
(second game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
West 1 0 2 0 3 0 0 2 0 8 14 0
East 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 x 2 8 4
WP: Ford Smith (Kansas City Monarchs)   LP: Rufus Lewis (Newark Eagles)
Attendance: 38,402
Notes: This was the best attendance recorded for any East-West game outside of Comiskey Park.
August 22, 1948
(first game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2
West 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 x 3 7 1
WP: Bill Powell (Birmingham Black Barons)   LP: Rufus Lewis (Newark Eagles)
Attendance: 42,099
August 24, 1948 at Yankee Stadium, New York, NY
(second game)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
West 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 3
East 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 2 x 6 10 0
WP: Max Manning (Newark Eagles)   LP: Vibert Clarke (Cleveland Buckeyes)
Attendance: 17,928
Notes: A moment of silence was held before the game in honor of Babe Ruth, who had died the week before.
August 14, 1949
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 11 1
West 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
WP: Bob Griffith   LP: Gene Richardson
Attendance: 31,097
Notes: Attendance was the worst in nine years and a drop of 10,000 from the 1948 game

1950–1959

August 20, 1950
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 1
West 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 x 5 11 5
WP: Connie Johnson   LP: Raul Galata   Sv: Bill Powell
Home runs:
East: Junior Gilliam
West: None
Attendance: 24,614
August 12, 1951
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 10 3
West 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6 0
WP: Kelly Searcy   LP: Vilbert Clarke   Sv: Wilmer Harris
Attendance: 21,312
August 17, 1952
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 7 4
West 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 x 7 9 1
WP: Dick Phillips   LP: "Groundhog" Thompson   Sv: Bill "Fireball" Beverly
Attendance: 18,279
August 16, 1953
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 4
West 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 x 5 6 1
WP: Sam (Buddy) Woods   LP: Willie Gaines   Sv: John "Stony" Jackson
Attendance: 10,000 (est.)
August 22, 1954
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 8 3
West 0 0 3 0 2 1 2 0 x 8 9 1
WP: Henry Mason (Kansas City Monarchs)   LP: Andy Carpenter (Detroit Stars)   Sv: Charlie Davis (Memphis Red Sox)
Home runs:
East: Wesley Dennis (Birmingham Black Barons)
West: Fran Herrera (Kansas City Monarchs)
Attendance: 10,000 (est.)
  • Batteries:
    • East: Frank Thompson (Birmingham Black Barons), Andy Carpenter (Detroit Stars) (L), Harold Gordon (Detroit Stars) and Otha Bailey (Detroit Stars)
    • West: Isaiah Harris (Memphis Red Sox), Henry Mason (Kansas City Monarchs) (W), Charlie Davis (Memphis Red Sox) (S) and Juan Armenteros (Kansas City Monarchs)
  • Notes:
    • There were only six teams in the NAL this year. The West squad was made up of players from the Kansas City Monarchs, Memphis Red Sox, and Louisville Clippers, while the East team consisted of the Indianapolis Clowns, Birmingham Black Barons, and Detroit Stars. The NAL was obviously struggling both at the gate and in its talent level, but the East-West Game was still a showcase of its young prospects for big league scouts.
    • Buck O'Neil managed the West team, while Hall of Famer Oscar Charleston managed the East. Charleston, who played in the first East-West Game in 1933, would die two months later.
July 31, 1955
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1
West 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 x 2 2 1
WP: Isaiah Harris (Memphis Red Sox)   LP: Jo Misky Carpedge (Birmingham Black Barons)   Sv: Enrique Moroto (Kansas City Monarchs)
Attendance: 11,257
  • Batteries:
    • East: Aaron Jones (Detroit Stars), Elliott Coleman (Birmingham Black Barons), Jo Misky Carpedge (Birmingham Black Barons) (L) and Otha Bailey (Birmingham Black Barons)
    • West: Satchel Paige (Kansas City Monarchs), Charlie Davis (Memphis Red Sox), Isiah Harris (Memphis Red Sox) (W), Enrique Moroto (Kansas City Monarchs) (S) and Juan Armenteros (Kansas City Monarchs)
  • Notes
    • Satchel Paige, described in nearly every news story as "ageless", returned to the NAL after his final stint with the St. Louis Browns and before signing with Bill Veeck's Miami team in the International League as the starting pitcher for the West. He pitched three hitless innings, allowing only one batter to reach on an error.
    • There were only four teams in the NAL this year. The West was made up of players from the Kansas City Monarchs and the Memphis Red Sox, while the East team was composed of players from the Birmingham Black Barons and the Detroit Stars.
    • Managers for the two squads were Buck O'Neil of the Monarchs (in his final season in the NAL) and Ed Steele of the Stars.
August 12, 1956
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 3 0 3 0 0 1 1 2 1 11 13 2
West 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 9 2
WP: Willie Harris (Detroit Stars)   LP: Arzell "Ace" Robinson (Memphis Red Sox)
Attendance: 8,000 (est.)
  • Notes:
    • Again, there were only four teams in the league. West squad was chosen from players on the Kansas City Monarchs and Memphis Red Sox and the East team from the Birmingham Black Barons and Detroit Stars.
    • Homer "Goose" Curry of the Red Sox managed the West team, while Ed Steele of the Stars managed the East.
    • Future country-western music star Charlie Pride was a substitute for the West team, playing right field and was credited with two singles and an RBI in two plate appearances.
July 28, 1957
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 5 7 3
West 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 3 x 8 11 2
WP: Gene Williams   LP: Elliott
August 31, 1958 at Yankee Stadium, New York, NY
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 0 6 6 2
West 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 5 5 3
WP: Willie Harris   LP: TBD
August 10, 1959 (11 innings)
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
East 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 7 8 1
West 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 8 10 2
WP: Pete Mumford   LP: James Gilmore
Home runs:
East: None
West: Willie Smith, Ernest Harris
Attendance: 9,000

1960–1962

August 21, 1960
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 5 5 5
West 0 2 1 1 4 0 0 0 x 8 8 3
WP: Galvin Grant   LP: Herbert Paymon   Sv: Willie Gilmore
Home runs:
East: None
West: Art Hamilton
Attendance: 5,000 (est.)
August 20, 1961 at Yankee Stadium, New York, NY
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
West 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 2 7 6 2
East 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 4
WP: Satchel Paige   LP: Pete Gilliam
August 27, 1962 at Municipal Stadium, Kansas City, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
East 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 5
West 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 X 5 8 2
WP: Sherman Cottingham   LP: Robert Hollaway   Sv: Pointer
Home runs:
East: None
West: Willie Hardwick
  • Notes:
    • During the fifth inning, recent Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who played for the Monarchs and in the East-West game in 1945, was honored and given a key to the city and numerous other awards in the fifth inning. Satchel Paige and a number of other former Monarch players were also introduced.
    • This was the last East-West game. The NAL disbanded at the close of the season

Further reading

References

  • Holway, John Complete Book of Baseball's Negro Leagues (Hastings House, 2001)
  • Lester, Larry Black Baseball's National Showcase: The East-West All-Star Game, 1933-1953 (University of Nebraska Press, 2001)
  • Peterson, Robert W. Only The Ball Was White, (New York: Prentice-Hall Englewood-Cliffs, 1970)
  • New York Times New York, NY: Aug 13, 1951. p. 22; Aug 18, 1952. p. 21; Aug 17, 1953. p. 20; Sep 1, 1958. p. 16; Aug 11, 1959. p. 31; Aug 21, 1961. p. 27
  • Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago, IL: Jul 3, 1955. p. A2; Aug 1, 1955. p. C4; Jul 29, 1957. p. C4; Aug 10, 1959. p. C5; Aug 22, 1960. p. C2
  • Daily Defender, Chicago, IL: Jul 25, 1957. p. 24; Aug 22, 1960, p. 22; Aug 28, 1962. p. 22
  • Kansas City Star, Kansas City, MO: Aug 27, 1962. p. 27
Art Pennington

Arthur David "Superman" Pennington (May 18, 1923 – January 4, 2017) was an all-star Negro League baseball player in the 1940s.Pennington played for the Chicago American Giants (1941–1945, 1950), the Birmingham Black Barons (1945), as well as in the Mexican Baseball League (1946–1948), the U.S. minor league system (1949, 1952–1954, 1958-1959), and in Cuban and Venezuelan leagues.

He played in the 1942 and 1950 East-West All-Star Game.Pennington retired from Rockwell Collins in 1985; his house was badly damaged in a 2008 flood that destroyed most of his personal baseball memorabilia.

He is included as card # 97 in the Topps 2009 Allen & Ginter baseball card nostalgia set.

Bertrum Hunter

Bertrum "Nate" Hunter (October 20, 1910 – April 25, 1948) was an American baseball pitcher in the Negro Leagues. He played professionally from 1931 to 1936 with several teams. He pitched for the East in the inaugural East-West All-Star Game in 1933. Hunter played in Mexico, after his negro league career, until 1944.

Cal Jones

Calvin Jack Jones (February 7, 1933 – December 9, 1956) was a college football player for the University of Iowa. Jones is one of only two Iowa football players (along with Nile Kinnick) to have his jersey number retired by the school. Jones became the first Hawkeye, and the first African-American, to win the Outland Trophy in 1955. He played one year with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Western Interprovincial Football Union. He died in a plane crash after playing in the East–West All-Star Game.

Cal Jones is a member of The Pigskin Club Of Washington, D.C. National Intercollegiate All-American Football Players Honor Roll.

Dick Lundy (baseball)

Richard Benjamin Lundy (July 10, 1898 – January 5, 1962) was an African American shortstop in the Negro Leagues for numerous teams. He was born in Jacksonville, Florida.

In 1921, his batting average was reportedly .484. Lundy became the player-manager of the Bacharach Giants from 1925 through 1928, leading the team to two Eastern Colored League pennants (1926, 1927). In the 1926 Negro League World Series, Lundy had six RBIs, four runs scored, and six stolen bases. The Giants, however, lost the series.

Lundy made one appearance in the East-West All-Star Game, playing shortstop for the East. By this point, he had become part of what was called the "million dollar infield", along with Oliver Marcell, Frank Warfield, and Jud Wilson, playing for the Baltimore Black Sox in 1929. His career was often compared to that of Joe Cronin.

At age 54, Lundy received votes listing him on the 1952 Pittsburgh Courier player-voted poll of the Negro leagues best players ever.Lundy remained in baseball around 33 years, finishing out his baseball career as a manager. He died at age 63 in Jacksonville after a lingering illness. He was among 39 Negro Leagues players, managers, and executives who were considered for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006, but fell short of the necessary 75% vote. Writer Bill James ranked Lundy as the third-greatest shortstop in Negro league history, behind John Henry Lloyd and Willie Wells.

Ernest Westfield

Ernest Westfield (born November 30, 1939 in Cleveland, Tennessee) is a former right-handed pitcher in Negro league baseball who played from 1959-1965 for the Birmingham Black Barons. At 6' 3" and 160 lbs., he batted and threw right-handed. He was the starting pitcher for the East in the 1960 East-West All-Star Game.

Frankie Austin

Frank Samuel "Pee Wee" Austin (May 22, 1917 – January 15, 1960) was a Panamanian professional baseball player.

He was a shortstop in the Negro Leagues and minor leagues. He played professionally from 1944 to 1956, playing with the Philadelphia Stars of the Negro National League from 1944 to 1948. He played in the 1945 East-West All-Star Game. Austin played in the International League in 1949, and the Pacific Coast League from 1949 to 1956. Although he never played in the Major Leagues, Austin was one of the first two black players to play for the New York Yankees organization in 1949 along with Luis Marquez.

Fred Bankhead

Fred Bankhead (1912–1972) was a former player for the Negro Leagues. He received 490,000 votes for third place in the 1939 East West All Star Game. In 1942, Bankhead made the East-West All Star Game.Bankhead joined the Negro leagues in 1936. He made his debut playing as a reserve infielder for the team named the Birmingham Black Barons.

He played second base for the Memphis Red Sox.His brothers Sam, Joe, and Garnett all also played in the Negro Leagues, and his brother Dan played Major League Baseball.

George Stanich

George Anthony Stanich (born November 4, 1928) was an American high jumper who won a bronze medal at 1948 Summer Olympics. He played college basketball for the UCLA Bruins, where he was a two-time all-conference player in the Pacific Coast Conference (now the Pac-12 Conference).

As a basketball player at the University of California, Los Angeles, Stanich was a guard and led his team to its first NCAA tournament appearance in 50. He scored 9 points in the East-West All-Star Game and was a first-team all-American (as named by Converse), the first of 24 Bruins who would earn this honor under John Wooden. As a Bruin baseball player, he was a pitcher for 3 seasons, including throwing a 5-hit shutout as a sophomore as UCLA beat USC for the first time in five years. He would become a professional baseball player after graduation, pitching for the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League, as well as Idaho Falls Russets and Stockton.

On the morning of July 30, 1948, George Stanich, representing the Los Angeles Athletic Club, was one of 26 participants in the high jump trials at the 1948 Olympic Games in London. Twenty men qualified for the finals, and 18 participated in the finals in the rain later that day. The gold medal was won with a jump of 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m); Stanich was one of four competitors who cleared 6 ft 4.75 in (1.95 m). While he thought he had cleared the bar on his last attempt at 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), his trail leg hit the bar. Officials from the International Amateur Athletic Federation initially announced that fewer misses would be used to determine the finishing places of the four tied jumpers; the IAAF then announced all four would share second place and the silver medal. Days later they reversed themselves again, and Stanich became the bronze medal winner.

Harry Else

Harry Elmo "Speed" Else (January 9, 1906 – December 28, 1986) was an American baseball catcher and pitcher in the Negro Leagues. He played from 1932 to 1940 with several teams, including the Kansas City Monarchs and the Chicago American Giants. He played for the West in the 1936 East-West All-Star Game.

Irvin Castille

Irvin Castille (May 17, 1926 – August 4, 2015) was a shortstop and third baseman who played from 1951 through 1953 in the Negro American League. Born in Lafayette, Louisiana, he batted and threw right handed.

Castille joined the Birmingham Black Barons in the dying years of the Negro Leagues. He also was selected to the East–West All-Star Game in 1953. In between, he played with the Brandon Greys club of the independent Mandak League in its 1952 season.On June 8, 2008, Major League Baseball staged a Special Draft of the surviving Negro League players, doing a tribute for the surviving Negro Leaguers who were kept out of the Big Leagues because of their race. MLB clubs each selected a former NLB player, as Castille was drafted by the Oakland Athletics.A week later, the San Diego Padres honored him during a homestand highlighted by a Salute to the Negro Leagues, fireworks and U.S. Army Appreciation Day at Petco Park. Late in the month, he signed autographs and shared stories about his playing days in the Times of Greatness Mobile event held at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.Castille was a long resident of Whittier, California, where he died in 2015 at the age of 83.

Isaiah Harris

Isaiah "Lefty" Harris (July 2, 1929 – September 18, 2001) was a pitcher in Negro League baseball. He played for the Memphis Red Sox in 1949 and 1950. In 1950, he went 9–4 with a 3.13 earned run average. He was considered one of the best pitchers in the Negro American League western division.Harris pitched two no-hitters in the span of six days, and he pitched in the 1950 and 1955 East-West All-Star Game.

Juan Armenteros

Juan Armenteros (June 24, 1928 – October 8, 2003) was a professional Cuban baseball player in the Negro Leagues. He played as a catcher for a number of teams including the Kansas City Monarchs from 1953 to 1955 as well as the Havana Cubans from 1951 to 1953. Armenteros played in the 1953 East-West All-Star Game as well as the Negro Leagues All Star Team for three years.

Leroy Matlock

Leroy Matlock (March 12, 1907 - February 6, 1968) was an American baseball pitcher in the Negro Leagues. He played from 1929 to 1938 with several teams. He was selected to the 1935 and the 1936 East-West All-Star Game. Matlock was considered one of the top left handed pitchers of the 1930s.At age 45, Matlock received votes listing him on the 1952 Pittsburgh Courier player-voted poll of the Negro Leagues' best players ever.He is listed as buried in the Elmhurst Cemetery in St. Paul, Minnesota.

List of Negro league baseball champions

This List of Negro league baseball champions includes champions of black baseball prior to the organization of any traditional Negro league and goes through to the collapse of segregated baseball after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color line in 1946. Champions include self-declared, regional and (later) league champions, but is limited to top-tier teams and major Negro leagues. The champions listed after 1948 through the 1950s are listed for posterity, but the quality of play had deteriorated so far as to only incidentally be covered by contemporary media or historians.

Lyman Bostock Sr.

Lyman Wesley Bostock Sr. (March 11, 1918 – June 24, 2005) was an American baseball player who played first base for several Negro League teams from 1938 to 1954. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.Bostock played for the Brooklyn Royal Giants, Birmingham Black Barons, Chicago American Giants, Jackie Robinson All-Stars, Winnipeg Buffaloes, and Carman Cardinals. He played in the 1941 East-West All-Star Game while with Birmingham.

Like many Negro Leaguers, Bostock wanted to play in Major League Baseball, but never got the chance. Bostock played in or attended various MLB old-timers games in the 1970s and 1980s, including 1976 in Minnesota, and 1989 in Kansas City.Bostock died in 2005, in his hometown of Birmingham.

His son, Lyman Bostock Jr., played for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels from 1975 until his outstanding career was cut short when he was shot and killed in his hometown of Gary, Indiana, during the 1978 season.

New York Black Yankees

The New York Black Yankees were a professional Negro league baseball team based in New York City, Paterson, NJ, and Rochester, NY which played in the Negro National League from 1936 to 1948. The Black Yankees played in Paterson, New Jersey from 1933-1937 and then from 1939-1945. The 1938 season saw the Black Yankees trying their fate at New York's Triborough Stadium. Paterson's strong fan support returned the Black Yankees to Paterson's Hinchliffe Stadium.

Pedro Formental

Pedro Formental (April 19, 1915 – September 15, 1992) was a Cuban professional baseball outfielder in the Mexican League, Negro Leagues and in the Cuban League. He played from 1943 to 1955 with several teams. He was selected to the 1949 East-West All-Star Game. Formental also played in the 1951, 1952, and 1953 Caribbean Series.

Rags Matthews

Raymond "Rags" Matthews (August 17, 1905 – January 2, 1999) was an All-American football player at Texas Christian University in the 1920s, playing end on both offense and defense.

A Fort Worth native, Matthews attended Poly High School before TCU. He lettered three times under coach Matty Bell, during which the Horned Frogs posted a cumulative record of 17-5-5. He was named the team's Most Valuable Player after the 1926 and 1927 seasons, and was selected to play in the Shrine East-West All-Star Game as a senior in 1927, the first year players from the Southwest Conference were included.

Matthews was named to the All-Time All-SWC Team in 1969, and was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1971. He died in his hometown at the age of 93 in 1999.

Smoky Owens

Raymond "Smoky" Owens (1912 - September 7, 1942) was an American baseball pitcher in the Negro Leagues. He played from 1939 to 1942 with the Cleveland Bears, St. Louis Stars, and the Cincinnati Clowns. He was selected to the second 1939 East-West All-Star Game. Owens died in a car accident on September 7, 1942. Ulysses Brown also died, while Eugene Bremmer, Herman Watts, Alonzo Boone, and Wilbur Hayes were also injured.

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