Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Ed Walsh portrait 1911
The lowest career ERA is 1.82, set by Chicago White Sox pitcher Ed Walsh.

Origins

Henry Chadwick is credited with devising the statistic, which caught on as a measure of pitching effectiveness after relief pitching came into vogue in the 1900s. Prior to 1900—and, in fact, for many years afterward—pitchers were routinely expected to pitch a complete game, and their win-loss record was considered sufficient in determining their effectiveness.

After pitchers like James Otis Crandall and Charley Hall made names for themselves as relief specialists, gauging a pitcher's effectiveness became more difficult using the traditional method of tabulating wins and losses. Some criterion was needed to capture the apportionment of earned-run responsibility for a pitcher in games that saw contributions from other pitchers for the same team. Since pitchers have primary responsibility for putting opposing batters out, they must assume responsibility when a batter they do not retire at the plate moves to base, and eventually reaches home, scoring a run. A pitcher is assessed an earned run for each run scored by a batter (or that batter's pinch-runner) who reaches base while batting against that pitcher. The National League first tabulated official earned run average statistics in 1912 (the outcome was called "Heydler's statistic" for a while, after then-NL secretary John Heydler), and the American League later accepted this standard and began compiling ERA statistics.

Recently written baseball encyclopedias display ERAs for earlier years, but these were computed retroactively. Negro League pitchers are often rated by RA, or total runs allowed, since the statistics available for Negro League games did not always distinguish between earned and unearned runs.

ERA in different decades and baseball eras

As with batting average, the definition of a good ERA varies from year to year. During the dead-ball era of the 1900s and 1910s, an ERA below 2.00 (two earned runs allowed per nine innings) was considered good. In the late 1920s and through the 1930s, when conditions of the game changed in a way that strongly favored hitters, a good ERA was below 4.00; only the highest caliber pitchers, for example Dazzy Vance or Lefty Grove, would consistently post an ERA under 3.00 during these years. In the 1960s, sub-2.00 ERAs returned, as other influences such as ballparks with different dimensions were introduced. Today, an ERA under 4.00 is again considered good.

The all-time single-season record for the lowest ERA is held by Dutch Leonard, who in 1914 had an earned run average of 0.96, pitching 224.2 innings with a win-loss record of 19-5.[1] The all-time record for the lowest single season earned run average by a pitcher pitching 300 or more innings is 1.12, set by Bob Gibson in 1968. The record for the lowest career earned run average is 1.82, held by Ed Walsh, who played from 1904 through 1917.

Some researchers dissent from the official Major League Baseball record and claim that the pitcher with the all-time lowest earned run average is Tim Keefe, who had an earned run average of 0.86 in 1880 while appearing in 12 of his team's 83 games and pitching 105 innings (with a win-loss record of 6-6). But a purported record based on so few innings pitched is highly misleading. Over the years, more than a dozen part-time pitchers have pitched 105 or more innings and had an earned run average lower than 0.86. Major League Baseball recognizes many records from the 19th century—including Will White's 1879 record of 680 innings pitched, Charles Radbourne's 1884 record of 59 wins, and Pud Galvin's 1883 record for 75 games started, but does not recognize Keefe as the pitcher having the all-time lowest single season earned run average.

Infinite and undefined

Some sources may list players with infinite ERAs. This can happen if a pitcher allows one or more earned runs without retiring a batter (usually in a single appearance). Additionally, an undefined ERA occasionally occurs at the beginning of a baseball season. It is sometimes incorrectly displayed as zero or as the lowest ranking ERA, even though it is more akin to the highest.

Other external factors

Starters and relievers

At times it can be misleading to judge relief pitchers solely on ERA, because they are charged only for runs scored by batters who reached base while batting against them. Thus, if a relief pitcher enters the game with his team leading by 1 run, with 2 outs and the bases loaded, and then gives up a single which scores 2 runs, he is not charged with those runs. If he retires the next batter (and pitches no more innings), his ERA for that game will be 0.00 despite having surrendered the lead. (He is likely recorded with a blown save.) Starting pitchers operate under the same rules but are not called upon to start pitching with runners already on base. In addition, relief pitchers know beforehand that they will only be pitching for a relatively short while, allowing them to exert themselves more for each pitch, unlike starters who typically need to conserve their energy over the course of a game in case they are asked to pitch 7 or more innings. The reliever's freedom to use their maximum energy for a few innings, or even for just a few batters, helps relievers keep their ERAs down.

ERA, taken by itself, can also be misleading when trying to objectively judge starting pitchers, though not to the extent seen with relief pitchers.

DH rule

The advent of the designated hitter rule in the American League in 1973 made the pitching environment significantly different. Since then, pitchers spending all or most of their careers in the AL have been at a disadvantage in maintaining low ERAs, compared to National League pitchers who can often get an easy out when pitching to the opposition's pitcher, who is usually not a very good batter. Since 1997, when teams began playing teams from the other league during the regular season, the DH rule is in effect only when such interleague games are played in an American League park.

This difference between the leagues (the DH) also affects relievers, but not to the same degree. This is because National League relievers actually pitch to pitchers less often than NL starters do for a number of reasons, chiefly because relievers are usually active in later innings when pinch hitters tend to be used in the pitcher's batting spot.

Location

ERA is also affected somewhat by the ballpark in which a pitcher's team plays half its games, as well as the tendency of hometown official scorers to assign errors instead of base hits in plays that could be either.

As an extreme example, pitchers for the Colorado Rockies have historically faced many problems, all damaging to their ERAs. The combination of high altitude (5,280 ft or 1,610 m) and a semi-arid climate in Denver causes fly balls to travel up to 10% farther than at sea level. Denver's altitude and low humidity also reduce the ability of pitchers to throw effective breaking balls, due to both reduced air resistance and difficulty in gripping very dry baseballs. These conditions have been countered to some extent since 2002 by the team's use of humidors to store baseballs before games. These difficult circumstances for Rockies pitchers may not adversely affect their win-loss records, since opposing pitchers must deal with the same problems. Indeed, hometown hurlers have some advantage in any given game since they are physically acclimated to the altitude and often develop techniques to mitigate the challenges of this ballpark. Still, conditions there tend to inflate Rockies' ERAs relative to the rest of the league.

Sabermetric treatment of ERA

In modern baseball, sabermetrics uses several defense independent pitching statistics including a Defense-Independent ERA in an attempt to measure a pitcher's ability regardless of factors outside his control. Further, because of the dependence of ERA on factors over which a pitcher has little control, forecasting future ERAs on the basis of the past ERAs of a given pitcher is not very reliable and can be improved if analysts rely on other performance indicators such as strike out rates and walk rates. For example, this is the premise of Nate Silver's forecasts of ERAs using his PECOTA system.[2] Silver also developed a "quick" earned run average (QuikERA or QERA) to calculate an ERA from peripheral statistics including strikeouts, walks, and groundball percentage. Unlike peripheral ERA or PERA, it does not take into account park effects.[3] Another statistic derived from ERA is Adjusted ERA, also called ERA+, which adjusts a pitcher's ERA to a scale where 100 is average for the league and takes into account the various dimensions and other factors of each ballpark.

All-time career leaders

Rank ERA Player Team(s) Year(s)
1 1.82 Ed Walsh Chicago (AL), Boston (NL) 1904–17
2 1.89 Addie Joss Cleveland (AL) 1902–10
3 1.89 Jim Devlin Chicago (NA), Louisville (NL) 1875–77
4 2.02 Jack Pfiester Pittsburgh (NL), Chicago (NL) 1903–04, 1906–11
5 2.03 Smoky Joe Wood Boston (AL), Cleveland (AL) 1908–15, 1917–22

Career leaders in the live-ball era (post-1920)

Because of rules changes post-1920, most notably the abolition of the spitball and frequent replacement of soiled or scuffed baseballs, the increased importance of the home run (largely due to Babe Ruth), and the American League's adoption of the designated hitter rule, ERAs have been noticeably higher than in the early decades of the sport.

This is a list of the lowest ERAs among pitchers that played their entire careers after 1920 (minimum 1,000 innings pitched). Note that three of the top six (Clayton Kershaw, Whitey Ford and Sandy Koufax) were primarily starting pitchers. Hoyt Wilhelm was a reliever for most of his career, while the other two are closers.

Rank ERA Player Team(s) Year(s)
1 2.21 Mariano Rivera New York (AL) 1995–2013
2 2.36 Clayton Kershaw Los Angeles (NL) 2008–
3 2.52 Hoyt Wilhelm New York (NL), St. Louis, Cleveland, Baltimore, Chicago (AL), Los Angeles (AL), Atlanta, Chicago (NL), Los Angeles (NL) 1952–72
4 2.75 Whitey Ford New York (AL) 1950–67
5 2.76 Dan Quisenberry Kansas City, St. Louis, San Francisco 1979–90
6 2.76 Sandy Koufax Brooklyn/Los Angeles 1955–66

See also

References

  1. ^ according to www.mlb.com, the official website of Major League Baseball
  2. ^ Schwarz, Alan (August 22, 2004). "Numbers Suggest Mets Are Gambling on Zambrano". The New York Times. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
  3. ^ Silver, Nate (September 27, 2006). "Lies,Damned Lies: Playoff Hurlers". Baseball Prospectus. Prospectus Entertainment Ventures. Retrieved July 19, 2011.
1888 New York Giants season

The 1888 New York Giants season was the franchise's 6th season.

Claiming six future Hall of Famers (Roger Connor, Mickey Welch, Buck Ewing, Tim Keefe, Jim O'Rourke, and John Montgomery Ward), the team won the National League pennant by nine games and defeated the St. Louis Browns in the "World's Championship."

Keefe led the league in several major statistical categories, including wins, winning percentage, strikeouts, and earned run average.

1905 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1905 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the American League with a record of 92 wins and 56 losses, winning their first pennant. They went on to face the New York Giants in the 1905 World Series, losing 4 games to 1.

The pitching staff featured three future Hall of Famers: Rube Waddell, Eddie Plank, and Chief Bender. Waddell easily won the pitching triple crown in 1905, with 27 wins, 287 strikeouts, and a 1.48 earned run average.

1907 Chicago White Sox season

The 1907 Chicago White Sox led the American League for much of the first half but finished third.

Chicago allowed the fewest runs in the AL. The pitching staff was led by Ed Walsh, who paced the circuit in innings pitched (422.1), complete games (37), and earned run average (1.60).

Dick Donovan

Richard Edward Donovan (December 27, 1927 – January 6, 1997) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched for the Boston Braves (1950–1952), Detroit Tigers (1954), Chicago White Sox (1955–1960), Washington Senators (1961), and the Cleveland Indians (1962–1965). A Boston native, he graduated from North Quincy High School and served in the United States Navy during and after World War II.

Donovan batted left-handed and threw right-handed, stood 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg). During a 15-year major league career, he compiled 122 wins, 880 strikeouts, and a 3.67 earned run average, with 101 complete games, 25 shutouts and five saves. In 2,017​1⁄3 career innings pitched, he allowed 1,988 hits and 495 bases on balls.

Donovan, as a member of the White Sox, led the 1957 American League in winning percentage, posting a 16–6 (.727) won-lost record. He pitched in the 1959 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers. He lost his only World Series start in Game 3, but saved Game 5 for the White Sox, and pitched in relief in Game 6, allowing two hits, three earned runs, walked one, and struck out none. In his only postseason appearance, he compiled 0 wins, 1 loss, 1 save, 5 strikeouts, and a 5.40 earned run average. At the plate in the Series, he went 1-3 (.333 batting average).

His 1962 season was his career-best, when he won 20 games in 34 games started with 16 complete games and five shutouts in 250​1⁄3 innings pitched, all of them new career-highs, for Cleveland. The previous season, 1961, had seen Donovan lead the American League in earned run average with a stellar 2.40 mark in 168​2⁄3 innings for the first-year expansion edition of the Senators.

Johnny Morrison (baseball)

John Dewey "Jughandle Johnny" Morrison (October 22, 1895 – March 20, 1966) was a professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher over parts of ten seasons (1920–1927, 1929–1930) with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Brooklyn Robins. For his career, he compiled a 103–80 record in 297 appearances, with a 3.65 earned run average and 546 strikeouts. May was a member of the 1925 World Series champion Pirates, pitching three times during their seven-game defeat of the Washington Senators. In World Series play, he recorded no decisions in 3 appearances, with a 2.89 earned run average and 7 strikeouts.

Morrison was born in Pellville, Kentucky, and later died in Louisville, Kentucky, at the age of 70, and was buried at Rosehill Elmwood Cemetery. His son, Dwane Morrison, was a college basketball coach, most notably at Georgia Tech.

List of Major League Baseball annual ERA leaders

In baseball, earned run average (ERA) is a statistic used to evaluate pitchers, calculated as the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. A pitcher is assessed an earned run for each run scored by a baserunner who reached base while batting against that pitcher, whether by hit, base on balls or "walk", or being hit by a pitched ball; an earned run can be charged after the pitcher is relieved if he allows the runner before leaving the game. Runs scored by players who reach base on errors, passed balls, or catcher interference under special circumstances are treated as unearned runs, and do not count towards the pitcher's ERA.Major League Baseball recognizes the player in each league with the lowest earned run average each season. The first ERA champion in the National League was George Bradley; in the National League's inaugural 1876 season, Bradley posted a 1.23 ERA for the St. Louis Brown Stockings, allowing 78 earned runs in 573 innings pitched. The American League was established in 1901, and Hall of Fame pitcher Cy Young led that league with a 1.62 ERA for the Boston Americans during the 1901 season.Over the course of his 17-year major league career, Lefty Grove led the American League in ERA nine times, with a career single-season low of 2.06 for the 1931 Philadelphia Athletics. Roger Clemens has won the second-most ERA titles, capturing six in the American League and one in the National League. Sandy Koufax led the National League in ERA for five consecutive seasons (1962–1966); Koufax' five awards are the most won consecutively by any player and are tied for the most awards by a player in the National League with Christy Mathewson and Clayton Kershaw. In the American League, Walter Johnson also won five ERA titles, and Pedro Martínez has won a total of five (four American League and one National League) with two different teams.The most recent ERA champions are Blake Snell in the American League and Jacob deGrom in the National League.

The lowest single-season ERA in league history was posted by Tim Keefe, whose 0.86 ERA in 105 innings pitched for the National League's Troy Trojans in 1880 led his closest competitor by .52 runs. In the American League, Dutch Leonard's 0.96 ERA is a single-season record. Keefe and Leonard are the only two pitchers ever to allow less than one run per nine innings pitched in a single season. The widest margin of victory for an ERA champion is 1.96 runs, achieved when Martínez' 1.74 ERA led Clemens' 3.70 in the American League during the 2000 season. The largest margin of victory in the National League is 1.26 runs—Dazzy Vance's 2.61 ERA over Carl Hubbell's 3.87 in 1930. The smallest margin of victory for an ERA champion is .009 runs. Although the statistic is traditionally recorded to two decimal places by most sources, the 1988 American League title was decided by a margin of less than one hundredth of a run when Allan Anderson's ERA of 2.446 (55 earned runs in ​202 1⁄3 innings) bested Teddy Higuera's 2.455 mark (62 earned runs in ​227 1⁄3 innings). Other contests decided by one hundredth or less include Luis Tiant's 1.91 ERA ahead of Gaylord Perry's 1.92 in 1972 and Mark Fidrych (2.34) over Vida Blue (2.35) in 1976.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award

In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is annually given to one player from each league as voted on by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). The award was established in 1940 by the Chicago chapter of the BBWAA, which selected an annual winner from 1940 through 1946. The award became national in 1947; Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodgers' second baseman, won the inaugural award. One award was presented for both leagues in 1947 and 1948; since 1949, the honor has been given to one player each in the National and American League. Originally, the award was known as the J. Louis Comiskey Memorial Award, named after the Chicago White Sox owner of the 1930s. The award was renamed the Jackie Robinson Award in July 1987, 40 years after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color line.

Of the 140 players named Rookie of the Year (as of 2016), 16 have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame—Jackie Robinson, five American League players, and ten others from the National League. The award has been shared twice: once by Butch Metzger and Pat Zachry of the National League in 1976; and once by John Castino and Alfredo Griffin of the American League in 1979. Members of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers have won the most awards of any franchise (with 18), twice the total of the New York Yankees, and members of the Philadelphia and Oakland Athletics (eight), who have produced the most in the American League. Fred Lynn and Ichiro Suzuki are the only two players who have been named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in the same year, and Fernando Valenzuela is the only player to have won Rookie of the Year and the Cy Young Award in the same year. Sam Jethroe is the oldest player to have won the award, at age 32, 33 days older than 2000 winner Kazuhiro Sasaki (also 32). Shohei Ohtani of the Los Angeles Angels and Ronald Acuña Jr. of the Atlanta Braves are the most recent winners.

Mike Moore (baseball)

Michael Wayne Moore (born November 26, 1959), is a former Major League Baseball pitcher.

In college Moore pitched for Oral Roberts University, going 28-11 with an ERA of 2.64. The Seattle Mariners drafted him with the first pick overall in the 1981 MLB amateur draft. During a 14-year baseball career, Moore pitched for the Mariners (1982–1988), Oakland Athletics (1989–1992) and the Detroit Tigers (1993–1995).

He made his Major League Baseball debut on April 11, 1982, and played his final game on August 31, 1995. His career concluded with a regular season win-loss record of 161-176 with a 4.39 earned run average, 79 complete games, and 16 shutouts in 450 games pitched (2,831.7 innings pitched). Moore was elected to the American League All-Star team in 1989 and finished third in the Cy Young Award voting.

Moore played for the Athletics in two World Series. He was a member of the A's team that swept the San Francisco Giants in the 1989 World Series, starting and winning two of the four games, and hitting a double as well. He was also on the A's team that lost to the Cincinnati Reds in the 1990 World Series. In 5 postseason series, Moore compiled a 3-2 won-loss record with a 3.29 earned run average.

Nippon Professional Baseball Most Valuable Player Award

The Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award (最優秀選手, Saiyūshūsenshu) is an honor given annually in baseball to two outstanding players in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), one each for the Central League and Pacific League.

Each league's award is voted on by national baseball writers. Each voter places a vote for first, second, and third place among the players of each league. The formula used to calculate the final scores is a weighted sum of the votes. The player with the highest score in each league wins the award.The first recipient of the award was Eiji Sawamura, and the most recent winners are Alex Ramírez, from the Central League, and Yu Darvish, from the Pacific League. In 1940, Victor Starffin became the first player to win the award consecutively and multiple times. Eiji Sawamura and Kazuhisa Inao are the youngest players to receive the awards in 1937 and 1957, respectively, at the ages of 20. In 1988, Hiromitsu Kadota became the oldest player to receive the award at the age of 40.The most recent winners of the award are Yoshihiro Maru of the Hiroshima Toyo Carp and Hotaka Yamakawa of the Saitama Seibu Lions.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (B)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 180 have had surnames beginning with the letter B. Four of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Dave Bancroft, who played six seasons at shortstop for Philadelphia; Chief Bender, a pitcher with the team for two years; Dan Brouthers, whose career with the Phillies encompassed the 1896 season; and Jim Bunning, the pitcher whose number 14 is the only one retired by the Phillies for a player on this list. Of the four, Bancroft is the only one inducted to the Hall of Fame with the Phillies as his primary team. Bunning and Bender are two of four members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame on this list, although Bender was inducted as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics; the others are catcher Bob Boone and shortstop Larry Bowa.Among the 95 batters in this list, catcher Mack Burk has the highest batting average, at .500; he had one hit in two career plate appearances with Philadelphia. Other players with an average at or above .300 include Henry Baldwin (.313 in one season), Johnny Bates (.301 in two seasons), Beals Becker (.301 in three seasons), Wally Berger (.317 in one season), T. J. Bohn (.400 in one season), Brouthers (.344 in one season), George Browne (.300 in three seasons), Frank Bruggy (.310 in one season), and Smoky Burgess (.316 in four seasons). Pat Burrell leads Phillies players whose names begin with B in home runs, with 251, and runs batted in, with 827.Of this list's 85 pitchers, Doug Bair and Doug Bird share the best winning percentage with Mark Brownson. Each is undefeated in his decisions—Bair and Bird with 2–0 records, and Brownson at 1–0. The top winner among pitchers whose names begin with B is Bunning, who recorded 89 victories in 6 seasons with Philadelphia. Ray Benge lost 82 games in 6 seasons, the most among these pitchers. Bunning's 1,409 strikeouts are the highest total among B pitchers, and two pitchers (Joe Bisenius and Dan Boitano) share the earned run average (ERA) lead, with a 0.00 mark; among pitchers who have allowed a run, Stan Bahnsen's 1.35 ERA is best. Bunning is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, having pitched a perfect game on June 21, 1964.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (C)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 143 have had surnames beginning with the letter C. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Steve Carlton, who pitched for Philadelphia from 1972 to 1986; and first baseman Roger Connor, who appeared for the Phillies in the 1892 season. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Carlton's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as are right fielders Johnny Callison and Gavvy Cravath. The Phillies have also retired Carlton's number 32, the only player on this list so honored. Carlton holds two franchise records, leading all Phillies pitchers with 241 victories and 3,031 strikeouts.Among the 78 batters in this list, catcher Harry Cheek and shortstop Todd Cruz have the highest batting average, at .500; each recorded two hits in four career at-bats. Other players with an average above .300 include Ben Chapman (.308 in two seasons), Billy Consolo (.400 in one season), Duff Cooley (.308 in four seasons), Ed Cotter (.308 in one season), and Midre Cummings (.303 in one season). Callison's 185 home runs lead all players on this list, as do Cravath's 676 runs batted in.Of this list's 66 pitchers, two—Milo Candini and Steve Comer—have undefeated win–loss records: Candini with a 2–0 mark; and Comer with one victory and no defeats. Carlton's franchise-record 241 wins lead all pitchers on this list, as do his 161 losses. Mitch Chetkovich is the only member of this list with an earned run average (ERA) of 0.00, allowing no runs in three innings pitched. Among pitchers who have allowed earned runs, Harry Coveleski has the best average (2.09). Carlton's strikeout total of 3,031 is the most among all Phillies pitchers.One player, Bert Conn, has made 30% or more of his Phillies appearances as a pitcher and a position player. He amassed an 0–3 pitching record with a 7.77 ERA while batting .267 with three extra-base hits and seven runs scored.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (E–F)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 32 have had surnames beginning with the letter E, and 79 beginning with the letter F. Three of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: second baseman Johnny Evers, who played for the Phillies during the 1917 season; right fielder Elmer Flick, who played four seasons for Philadelphia; and first baseman Jimmie Foxx, who was a Phillie during the 1945 season. Two players, Foxx and Del Ennis, are members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. During his 11-season career with Philadelphia (1946–1956), right fielder Ennis, a member of the 1950 team nicknamed the Whiz Kids, notched 634 extra-base hits and scored 891 runs. Foxx was inducted into the Wall of Fame for his contributions as a member of the Philadelphia Athletics.Among the 59 batters in this list, left fielder Spoke Emery has the highest batting average, at .667; he hit safely two times in three career at-bats with Philadelphia. Other players with an average over .300 include Jim Eisenreich (.324 in four seasons), Flick (.338 in four seasons), Lew Fonseca (.319 in one season), and Ed Freed (.303 in one season). Ennis leads all members of this list in home runs and runs batted in, with 259 and 1,124, respectively. Flick's 29 home runs lead those players whose surnames start with F, although he had nearly twice as many triples (57); and he is followed closely by Pedro Feliz (26 home runs). Flick also leads those batters in runs batted in, with 377 in four years.Of this list's 54 pitchers, six pitchers share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage. Paul Erickson won two games for the Phillies without losing any, and five pitchers sport a 1–0 record: Tom Edens, Sergio Escalona, Paul Fletcher, Dana Fillingim, and Foxx, who pitched in nine games for the Phillies despite being primarily a first baseman. Flaherty owns the lowest earned run average (ERA), having appeared in one game, pitching ​1⁄3 inning and allowing no runs for an ERA of 0.00. Among the pitchers who have allowed runs, the best ERAs belong to Foxx and Steve Fireovid, who each have an average of 1.59 earned runs allowed per game. Scott Eyre's 1.62 earned run average from his two seasons with Philadelphia are the best among the pitchers whose surnames begin with E. Jumbo Elliott (36 wins and 205 strikeouts) and Charlie Ferguson (99 wins and 728 strikeouts) are tops in those categories among their respective lists; the latter is also one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, doing so on August 29, 1885, the first in franchise history. Chick Fraser also accomplished the feat on September 18, 1903.Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. In addition to Flaherty's statistics listed above, Harry Felix batted .135 with two runs batted in as a third baseman while amassing a 4.85 ERA and striking out three as a pitcher.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (K)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 68 have had surnames beginning with the letter K. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: pitcher Tim Keefe, who holds the record for the lowest single-season earned run average (ERA) in major league history; and right fielder Chuck Klein, who played 15 seasons for Philadelphia in three separate stints. The Phillies are listed by the Hall of Fame as Klein's primary team. He is one of two members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame—the other being John Kruk— and holds two franchise records (career slugging percentage – .553; career on-base plus slugging – .935). Klein is the only player on this list for whom the Phillies have retired a number; since he began play with Philadelphia before uniform numbers were widely in use and wore a variety of numbers throughout his Phillies career, he is represented by the letter "P" rather than a specific number.Among the 32 batters in this list, Klein has the highest batting average, at .326; other players with an average over .300 include Bill Keister (.320 in one season), Ed Konetchy (.321 in one season), and Kruk (.309 in six seasons). Klein also leads all players on this list with 243 home runs and 983 runs batted in.Of this list's 36 pitchers, two—Jack Kucek and Bob Kuzava—have undefeated win–loss records; each has won one game and lost none. Jim Konstanty, the closer for the Whiz Kids, has 51 victories and 39 defeats, most among this list's pitchers; Keefe's 226 strikeouts lead in that category. Johnny Klippstein compiled this list's lowest earned run average, with a 2.28 average in two seasons with Philadelphia.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (M)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 have had surnames beginning with the letter M. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: left fielder Tommy McCarthy, who played for the Phillies from 1886 to 1887; and second baseman Joe L. Morgan, who played for Philadelphia nearly a century later, in 1983. Three players on this list are members of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. Garry Maddox was the Phillies' center fielder for twelve seasons (1975–1986), stealing 248 bases and notching 62 triples. Left fielder Sherry Magee played 11 seasons (1904–1914) in Philadelphia, amassing a .299 batting average, and Tug McGraw pitched from the Phillies' bullpen as closer and setup man for 10 years, amassing 94 saves and recording the final out (a strikeout of Willie Wilson) in the 1980 World Series. Two Phillies on this list hold franchise records: George McQuillan's 1.79 earned run average (ERA) is the best mark among qualifying pitchers, and José Mesa recorded 112 saves in his four seasons with Philadelphia.Among the 115 batters in this list, second baseman Benny Meyer has the highest batting average (1.000); he hit safely in his only at-bat with the Phillies. Other players with an average about .300 include Art Madison (.353 in one season), Don McCormack (.400 in one season), Irish Meusel (.308 in four seasons), Doc Miller (.307 in two seasons), René Monteagudo (.301 in one season), and Johnny Moore (.329 in four seasons). Magee's 75 home runs and 886 runs batted in lead all members of this list.Of this list's 89 pitchers, Chuck Malone, Paul Masterson, and Roger McKee share the best win–loss record, in terms of winning percentage; each won one game and lost none in his Phillies career. Erskine Mayer accounted for 76 victories in his 7 seasons with Philadelphia, and Hugh Mulcahy leads all pitchers in this list with 89 defeats. Brett Myers' 986 strikeouts in 8 years are the best total in that category. Brad Moore has the lowest earned run average (ERA) among pitchers in this list, with a 1.08 mark amassed over two seasons; two position players—McCarthy and first baseman Art Mahan—each have 0.00 ERAs in their only Phillies pitching appearances. Kevin Millwood and Terry Mulholland are two of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown no-hitters; Mulholland threw his on August 15, 1990, and Millwood accomplished the feat on April 27, 2003.Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. Al Maul batted .282 with five extra-base hits as a left fielder while amassing a 6–5 record and a 5.81 ERA as a pitcher. Elmer Miller allowed 18 runs as a pitcher while notching a .237 average as a right fielder.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (S)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 187 have had surnames beginning with the letter S. Three of those players are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: shortstop Ryne Sandberg, who played one season for the Phillies before being traded to the Chicago Cubs and converting to second base; right fielder Casey Stengel, who played for the Phillies during the 1920 and 1921 seasons and was inducted as a manager; and third baseman Mike Schmidt, who in 1983 was named the greatest Phillie of all time during the election of Philadelphia's Centennial Team. Schmidt is this list's only Hall of Famer to have the Phillies listed as his primary team, and is one of five members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the others are second baseman Juan Samuel, pitcher Bobby Shantz (inducted as a Philadelphia Athletic), pitcher Chris Short, and pitcher Curt Simmons. Schmidt holds numerous franchise records, including most hits (2,234) and most total bases (4,404), and is the only Phillie on this list to have his number retired.Among the 99 batters in this list, left fielder and pitcher Edgar Smith has the highest batting average, at .750; he hit safely in three of his four career at-bats with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Monk Sherlock (.324 in one season), Jim Shilling (.303 in one season), Tripp Sigman (.326 in two seasons), Lonnie Smith (.321 in four seasons), Chris Snelling (.500 in one season), Bill Sorrell (.365 in one season), John Stearns (.500 in one season), Bobby Stevens (.343 in one season), Kelly Stinnett (.429 in one season), and Joe Sullivan (.324 in three seasons). Schmidt leads all players on this list, and all Phillies, with 548 home runs and 1,595 runs batted in.Of this list's 90 pitchers, four share the best win–loss record (1–0), in terms of winning percentage: Ben Shields, Wayne Simpson, Paul Stuffel, and Rich Surhoff. Short leads all members of this list in victories (132) and defeats (127), followed closely by Simmons in each category (115–110). Short's 1,585 strikeouts also lead, and he is followed by Curt Schilling's 1,554. The lowest earned run average (ERA) is shared by Surhoff and Jake Smith; each allowed no earned runs during their Phillies careers for an ERA of 0.00. Two other pitchers have ERAs under 2.00: Frank Scanlan (1.64) and Scott Service (1.69).Two Phillies have made 30% or more of their Phillies appearances as both pitchers and position players. In addition to Edgar Smith's batting notes above, he amassed a 15.43 ERA as a pitcher, striking out two. John Strike was hitless in seven plate appearances as a right fielder while amassing a 1–1 record as a pitcher.

Randy Sterling

Randall Wayne (Randy) Sterling (born April 21, 1951 in Key West, Florida) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched in three games for the New York Mets in 1974. He pitched 9​1⁄3 innings over the three games, winning one game and losing one, with two strikeouts and an earned run average of 4.82. His win came as the starting pitcher in his Major League debut on September 16, 1974 against the Montreal Expos in Montreal.Sterling was a 1st round draft pick of the Mets in 1969, and the 4th overall pick in the draft. He pitched in the minor leagues from 1969 to 1975. He pitched for the Tidewater Tides at the AAA level from 1973 to 1975. In 1973, he pitched 27 games with a 10–9 won–lost record and a 3.04 earned run average. In 1974 he pitched 28 games with a 12–11 won lost record and a 3.39 earned run average, earning a promotion to the Mets in September. His final professional season was 1975, in which he pitched 29 games for Tidewater, with a 10–11 won lost record and a 3.57 earned run average.

Ron Villone

Ronald Thomas Villone, Jr. (born January 16, 1970) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed relief pitcher. Villone

played for 12 teams in his career, tied for 3rd all time with pitcher Mike Morgan and outfielder Matt Stairs, and trailing only Octavio Dotel and Edwin Jackson, who have played for 13 teams each.Born in Englewood, New Jersey, Villone grew up in Bergenfield, New Jersey.

Slim Sallee

Harry Franklin Sallee (February 3, 1885 – March 23, 1950) was a professional baseball player. He was a left-handed pitcher over parts of fourteen seasons (1908–1921) with the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants and Cincinnati Reds. For his career, he compiled a 174–143 record in 476 appearances, with a 2.56 earned run average and 836 strikeouts. In Cardinals' franchise history, Sallee ranks 3rd all-time in earned run average (2.67), 7th in innings pitched (1905.3), 8th in games started (215) and wins (106, tied with Adam Wainwright), and 7th in losses (107).

Sallee pitched in two World Series, both against the Chicago White Sox, and was a member of the victorious Reds in the infamous "Black Sox" 1919 World Series. He produced the best season of his career for the 1919 Reds, going 21–7 with a 2.06 earned run average. He lost a World Series to the White Sox as a member of the 1917 Giants, starting Game 1 and losing 2-1 to Sox ace Eddie Cicotte in Chicago, driving in his team's only run. In World Series play, Sallee compiled a 1–3 record in four appearances, with a 3.45 earned run average and six strikeouts. Also in 1919, Sallee became just the second pitcher (at that time) to have more wins than walks in a season. Christy Mathewson did it twice (1913, 1914) and Bret Saberhagen accomplished this feat in 1994 with the New York Mets.

Sallee was born and later died in Higginsport, Ohio at the age of 65. He was buried at Confidence Cemetery in Georgetown, Ohio.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.