Earl of Munster

Earl of Munster was a title created twice, once in the Peerage of Ireland and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The first creation came in 1789 in favour of Prince William, the third son of King George III. He was made Duke of Clarence and St Andrews at the same time. When William succeeded to the throne as King William IV in 1830 the titles merged with the crown.

The second creation came in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on 12 May 1831 for George Augustus Frederick FitzClarence, the eldest illegitimate son of William IV. He was made Viscount FitzClarence and Baron Tewkesbury in the county of Gloucester at the same time.[1] The viscountcy was used as a courtesy title by the heir apparent to the earldom. The titles were created with remainder to his brothers Frederick, Adolphus and Augustus.

Lord Munster's great-grandson, the fifth earl (who succeeded his uncle), was a prominent Conservative politician and held ministerial office under five Prime Ministers. He was succeeded by his second cousin, the sixth Earl. He was the son of Brigadier General Charles FitzClarence, VC (8 May 1865 – 12 November 1914), son of Captain the Hon. George FitzClarence, third son of the first Earl. On the death of his son, the seventh Earl, in 2000, the titles became extinct.

See also Duchess of Munster.

Earldom of Munster
Coronet of a British Earl
Munster (Fitzclarence) Escutcheon

Blazon

Arms: The Royal Arms of King William IV (without the Escutcheon of the Arch Treasurer of the Holy Roman Empire, and without the Crown of Hanover) debruised by a Baton Sinister Azure charged with three Anchors Or. Crest: On a Chapeau Gules turned up Ermine a Lion statant guardant crowned with a Ducal Coronet Or and gorged with a Collar Azure charged with three Anchors Gold. Supporters: On the dexter side a Lion guardant ducally crowned Or, and on the sinister side a Horse Argent, each gorged with a Collar Azure charged with three Anchors Gold.

Creation date4 June 1831
MonarchWilliam IV
PeeragePeerage of the United Kingdom
First holderGeorge Fitzclarence
Last holderAnthony Fitzclarence
Heir apparentNone
Remainder tothe 1st Earl's heirs male whatsoever
Subsidiary titlesViscount Fitzclarence, Baron Tewkesbury
StatusExtinct
Extinction date30 December 2000
Armorial mottoNec Temere Nec Timide
(Neither rashly nor fearfully)

Earls of Munster; first creation (1789)

Earls of Munster; second creation (1831)

Male line family tree

Family of Earl of Munster
George FitzClarence
1st Earl

1794–1842
William FitzClarence
2nd Earl

1824–1901
Hon. Frederick FitzClarence
1826–1878
Capt. George FitzClarence
1836–1894
Lt. Edward FitzClarence
1837–1855
Edward
Viscount FitzClarence
1856–1870
Hon. Lionel FitzClarence
1857–1863
Geoffrey FitzClarence
3rd Earl

1859–1902
Hon. Arthur FitzClarence
1860–1861
Aubrey FitzClarence
4th Earl

1862–1928
Hon. William FitzClarence
1864–1899
Hon. Harold FitzClarence
1870–1926
Capt. Edward FitzClarence
1865–1897
Brig.gen. Charles FitzClarence
1865–1914
Capt. William FitzClarence
1868–1921
Lionel FitzClarence
1870–1936
Geoffrey FitzClarence
5th Earl

1906–1975
Edward FitzClarence6th Earl
1899–1983
Anthony FitzClarence
7th Earl

1926–2000

Notes

  1. ^ "No. 18803". The London Gazette. 13 May 1831. p. 923.

References

  • Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990,
  • Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages
Aloys Sprenger

Aloys Sprenger (born 3 September 1813, in Nassereith, Tyrol; died 19 December 1893 in Heidelberg) was an Austrian orientalist.

Sprenger studied medicine, natural sciences as well as oriental languages at the University of Vienna. In 1836 he moved to London, where he worked with the Earl of Munster on the latter's „Geschichte der Kriegswissenschaften bei den mohammedanischen Völkern“, ‘History of Military Science among the Muslim Peoples’, and thence in 1843 to Calcutta, where he became principal of Delhi College. In this capacity he had many textbooks translated into Hindustani from European languages.

In 1848 he was sent to Lucknow, to prepare a catalogue of the royal library there, the first volume of which appeared in Calcutta in 1854. This book, with its lists of Persian poets, its careful description of all the chief works of Persian poetry and its valuable biographical material, became a worthy guide for the exploration of Persian literature.

In 1850 Sprenger was named examiner, official government interpreter, and secretary of the Asiatic Society of Calcutta. He published many works while holding this latter position, among them “Dictionary of the Technical terms used in the sciences of the Musulmans” (1854) and “Ibn Hajar's biographical dictionary of persons who knew Mohammed” (1856).

Sprenger took a position as professor of oriental languages at the University of Bern in 1857, moving in 1881 to Heidelberg. His voluminous collection of Arabic, Persian, Hindustani and other manuscripts and printed material was eventually acquired by the Berlin State Library.

Amelia Cary, Viscountess Falkland

Amelia Cary, Viscountess Falkland (21 March 1807 – 2 July 1858), was a British noblewoman. Born the fifth illegitimate daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom (then Duke of Clarence) by his long-time mistress Dorothea Jordan. Amelia had four sisters and five brothers, all surnamed FitzClarence. Soon after their father became monarch, the FitzClarence children were raised to the ranks of younger children of a marquess. A granddaughter of George III, Amelia was named after her aunt Princess Amelia.

Anthony FitzClarence, 7th Earl of Munster

Anthony Charles FitzClarence, 7th Earl of Munster, FRSA (21 March 1926 – 30 December 2000) was the last Earl of Munster, Viscount FitzClarence and Baron Tewkesbury. The Earl of Munster was the last of the male line of FitzClarences that began with King William IV (Duke of Clarence until his accession in 1830) and his mistress, the comic actress Dorothea Jordan (née Bland).

The King's eldest son by Jordan, George FitzClarence, was created Earl of Munster in 1831. He was granted arms at the same time, consisting of the royal arms of Great Britain surmounted by a baton sinister charged with roses, as a mark of bastardy. The seventh earl made his way in the world without trading on his lineage, working variously as a publican, a graphic designer on newspapers, and latterly as an expert on medieval stained glass.

In 1983, he inherited the earldom on the death of his father Edward FitzClarence, 6th Earl of Munster. From then until the Government's expulsion of the hereditary peers in 1999, as part of the House of Lords Act, he was a regular attender at the House of Lords. For a short time he sat on the cross benches, but soon moved to the Conservative side of the House. A shy man, he spoke rarely there, content to be one of those silent peers that made the Lords, as Byron thought, so formidable an audience.

Aubrey FitzClarence, 4th Earl of Munster

Aubrey FitzClarence, 4th Earl of Munster, (7 June 1862 – 1 January 1928), was an English aristocrat, and, like his brother, Geoffrey, the great-grandson of King William IV by his mistress Dorothea Jordan.

Duke of Clarence and St Andrews

Duke of Clarence and St Andrews was a title awarded to a prince of the British Royal family. The creation was in the Peerage of Great Britain.While there had been several creations of Dukes of Clarence (and there was later a Duke of Clarence and Avondale), the only creation of a Duke of Clarence and St Andrews was in 1789 for Prince William, third son of King George III. When William succeeded his brother to the throne in 1830, the dukedom merged in the crown.

FitzClarence

Fitzclarence or FitzClarence is a pseudo-Anglo-Norman name meaning "son of Clarence"—it usually refers to a bastard son of a Duke of Clarence, or a descendant thereof, and was used by them as a surname.

The FitzClarence family was an illegitimate branch of the House of Hanover. Prince William, Duke of Clarence, and future king William IV of the United Kingdom, had at least ten children with his mistress Dorothea Jordan, all of whom took the surname FitzClarence. All of them were also granted by their father the rank of a marquess' younger sons or daughters.

The Duke of Clarence's eldest surviving illegitimate child, George FitzClarence (1794–1842), was created Earl of Munster in 1831 and his male-line was continued until the death of Anthony FitzClarence, 7th Earl of Munster in 2000. Two of Lord Munster's brothers, Frederick and Augustus (a priest), had issue that were also part of the family. Five daughters of William IV and Dorothy Jordan were married to nobles or prominent military figures, including William Hay, 18th Earl of Erroll, Lucius Cary, 10th Viscount Falkland, and Admiral Lord John Hallyburton. Only one, Mary, had no children.

The 10 children of Prince William, Duke of Clarence, future King of Great Britain and his mistress, Dorothy Jordan, and their descendants:

George FitzClarence (1794–1842) and his grandson:

Charles FitzClarence (1865–1914)

Henry FitzClarence (1795–1817)

Sophia FitzClarence (1796–1837)

Mary FitzClarence (1798–1864)

Frederick FitzClarence (1799–1854)

Elizabeth FitzClarence (1801–1856)

Adolphus FitzClarence (rear admiral) (1802–1856) (no issue)

Augusta FitzClarence (1803–1865)

Augustus FitzClarence (1805–1854)

Amelia FitzClarence (1807–1858)

William FitzClarence, 2nd Earl of Munster (1824–1901)

Geoffrey FitzClarence, 3rd Earl of Munster (1859–1902)

Aubrey FitzClarence, 4th Earl of Munster (1862–1928)

Geoffrey FitzClarence, 5th Earl of Munster (1906–1975)

Edward FitzClarence, 6th Earl of Munster (1899–1983)

Anthony FitzClarence, 7th Earl of Munster (1926–2000)

Geoffrey FitzClarence, 3rd Earl of Munster

Geoffrey George Gordon FitzClarence, 3rd Earl of Munster, DSO (18 July 1859 – 2 February 1902), known as Lord Tewkesbury 1870–1901, was a British peer, and the great-grandson of King William IV by his mistress Dorothea Jordan.

Geoffrey FitzClarence, 5th Earl of Munster

Geoffrey William Richard Hugh FitzClarence, 5th Earl of Munster, KBE, PC (17 February 1906 – 26 August 1975) was a British peer and Conservative politician.

George FitzClarence, 1st Earl of Munster

George Augustus Frederick FitzClarence, 1st Earl of Munster (29 January 1794 – 20 March 1842), was an English peer and soldier.

Lady Augusta Gordon

Lady Augusta Gordon (née FitzClarence; 17 November 1803 – 8 December 1865) was a British noblewoman. Born the fourth illegitimate daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom (then Duke of Clarence) by his long-time mistress Dorothea Jordan, she grew up at their Bushy House residence in Teddington. Augusta had four sisters and five brothers all surnamed FitzClarence. Soon after their father became monarch, the FitzClarence children were raised to the ranks of younger children of a marquess.

In 1827, Augusta married the Hon. John Kennedy-Erskine, a younger son of the 13th Earl of Cassilis. They had three children before he died in 1831. Five years later, she married Lord Frederick Gordon, the third son of the 9th Marquess of Huntly. After the death of her sister Sophia in 1837, Augusta was appointed State Housekeeper of Kensington Palace by her father. She was the mother of the novelist Wilhelmina FitzClarence, Countess of Munster.

List of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1820

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Lord Frederick Gordon-Hallyburton

Lord John Frederick Gordon Hallyburton GCH (15 August 1799 – 29 September 1878) was a Scottish naval officer and Member of Parliament.

He was born the Honourable John Frederick Gordon, third son of George Gordon, 5th Earl of Aboyne by his wife Catherine Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Cope, 2nd Baronet. On 28 May 1836 his father succeeded as 9th Marquess of Huntly. He reached the rank of Captain in the Royal Navy on 4 August 1836.On 24 August 1836 Gordon was married to Lady Augusta Kennedy-Erskine (17 June 1803 – 8 December 1865), widow since 6 April 1831 of the Hon. John Kennedy Erskine of Dun, second son of Archibald Kennedy, 1st Marquess of Ailsa. She was born Augusta FitzClarence, the fourth daughter of King William IV by the actress Dorothea Jordan, and had been raised to the rank of a Marquess's daughter on 24 May 1831. By this marriage he gained three step-children:

William Henry Kennedy Erskine (1 July 1828 – 5 September 1870), who inherited the House of Dun in Forfarshire and served as a captain in the 17th Lancers. He married Catherine Jones on 18 November 1862 and had issue, including the writer Violet Jacob.

Wilhelmina Kennedy Erskine (26 June 1830 – 9 October 1906), who married William George FitzClarence, 2nd Earl of Munster on 17 April 1855 and had issue.

Augusta Millicent Anne Mary Kennedy Erskine (11 May 1831 – 11 February 1895), who married James Hay Wemyss on 17 April 1855 and had issue.They had no children of their own. Gordon was made a Knight Grand Cross in the civil division of the Royal Guelphic Order on 22 August 1836 and a Lord of the Bedchamber to the King on 26 October that year.In the general election of 1841 Gordon was elected to Parliament for Forfarshire, succeeding his uncle Lord Douglas Gordon-Hallyburton. He also inherited his uncle's estates, and assumed the additional surname of Hallyburton in 1843. He was made a Deputy Lieutenant for Forfarshire on 5 June 1847 and re-elected for the county in the general election of that year. He remained in Parliament until the 1852 election, when he was replaced by Lauderdale Maule.Gordon-Hallyburton was promoted to Rear-Admiral on the Reserve Half Pay List on 12 May 1857, and promoted in the same list to Vice-Admiral on 4 November 1863 and full Admiral on 8 April 1868.He lived at Hallyburton House near Coupar Angus.

Lord Lieutenant of Surrey

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. Since 1737, all Lords Lieutenant have also been Custos Rotulorum of Surrey.

National Government (1937–1939)

The National Government of 1937–1939 was formed by Neville Chamberlain on his appointment as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by King George VI. He succeeded Stanley Baldwin, who announced his resignation following the coronation of the King and Queen in May 1937.

As a National Government it contained members of the Conservative Party, Liberal Nationals and National Labour, as well as a number of individuals who belonged to no political party. In September 1939, Chamberlain requested the formal resignations of all his colleagues, reconstructing the government in order to better confront Nazi Germany in the Second World War.

North Coogee

North Coogee is a coastal, western suburb of Perth, Western Australia, located within the City of Cockburn. The suburb is immediately to the north of Coogee, which takes its name from the lake, Lake Coogee, in the area, which translates to "Body of water" in the native Aboriginal Nyoongar language. Originally this lake was named Lake Munster after Prince William, the Earl of Munster, and later King William IV. The aboriginal name Kou-gee was recorded in 1841 by Thomas Watson and has been variously spelt Koojee, Coojee and Coogee.

North Coogee was created on 19 December 2005 and incorporated portions of the surrounding suburbs of Hamilton Hill, Spearwood and Coogee.

Third Churchill ministry

Winston Churchill formed the third Churchill ministry in the United Kingdom after the 1951 general election. He was reappointed as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom by King George VI and oversaw the accession of Queen Elizabeth II in 1952 and her coronation.

Wilhelmina FitzClarence, Countess of Munster

Wilhelmina FitzClarence, Countess of Munster (née Kennedy-Erskine; 27 June 1830 – 9 October 1906) was a British peeress and novelist. Her mother, Lady Augusta FitzClarence, was an illegitimate daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom; Wilhelmina, also known as Mina, was born the day after William's succession as monarch. She travelled as a young girl throughout Europe, visiting the courts of France and Hanover. In 1855, Mina married her first cousin William FitzClarence, 2nd Earl of Munster; they would have nine children, including the 3rd and 4th Earls of Munster.

The Earl and Countess of Munster lived at Palmeira Square in Brighton. Later in life, Lady Munster became a novelist and short story writer. In 1889, she released her first novel, Dorinda; a second, A Scotch Earl, followed two years later. The year 1896 saw the publication of Ghostly Tales, a collection of tales on the supernatural which have largely been forgotten today. Lady Munster also produced an autobiography entitled My Memories and Miscellanies, which was released in 1904. She died two years later.

William FitzClarence, 2nd Earl of Munster

William FitzClarence, 2nd Earl of Munster, (19 May 1824 – 30 April 1901), styled Viscount FitzClarence from 1831 to 1842, was a British peer, and the grandson of King William IV, whom he was named after, and who died in 1837, aged almost 72, when the younger William was just 13.

William IV of the United Kingdom

William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death in 1837. The third son of George III, William succeeded his elder brother George IV, becoming the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover.

William served in the Royal Navy in his youth, spending time in North America and the Caribbean, and was later nicknamed the "Sailor King". In 1789, he was created Duke of Clarence and St Andrews. In 1827, he was appointed as Britain's first Lord High Admiral since 1709. As his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne when he was 64 years old. His reign saw several reforms: the poor law was updated, child labour restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all of the British Empire, and the British electoral system refashioned by the Reform Act 1832. Although William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a prime minister contrary to the will of Parliament. Through his brother Adolphus, the Viceroy of Hanover, he granted his German kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution.

At the time of his death William had no surviving legitimate children, but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for twenty years. Late in life, he married and apparently remained faithful to the young princess who would become Queen Adelaide. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece Victoria and in Hanover by his brother Ernest Augustus.

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