Earl Leggett

Earl Franklin Leggett (March 5, 1933 – May 15, 2008) was an American football defensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears, Los Angeles Rams, and the New Orleans Saints. He played college football at Louisiana State University (LSU). He was also an assistant coach for various teams.[1]

Leggett's career in professional football began as a first-round draft pick of the Bears in 1957 and spanned 11 years (1957–1968). He is recorded as having played in 132 professional football games.

His career lasted from 1957 to 1965 with Chicago, where he played at both defensive tackle and defensive end positions. He was part of the famed "Monsters of the Midway" defense that led the Bears to the 1963 NFL championship. He was traded to the Los Angeles Rams in 1966, where he played in 10 regular season games with the Rams' "Fearsome Foursome" defense.

Toward the end of his career, journeyman Leggett played 20 games in 1967 and 1968 for the expansion New Orleans Saints franchise. While statistics on sacks were not recorded back then, www.pro-football-reference.com credits Leggett with 16 fumble recoveries, 1 safety and 1 interception.

Leggett did outstanding community service in Mississippi and the Gulf Coast region. He first played college football at Hinds Jr. College (today known as Hinds Community College) which was the only school that would give him a chance due to academic circumstances. He started playing for them at 16 (which was then legal) and was able to raise his academic standing to get into LSU. Leggett became an All-Southeastern Conference player at LSU.

Leggett had four children and 14 grandchildren.

Earl Leggett
No. 71, 72
Position:Defensive tackle, defensive end
Personal information
Born:March 5, 1933
Palatka, Florida
Died:May 15, 2008 (aged 75)
Raymond, Mississippi
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:265 lb (120 kg)
Career information
High school:Jacksonville (FL) Lee
College:LSU
NFL Draft:1957 / Round: 1 / Pick: 13
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com

Coaching career

Leggett helped shape the careers of Howie Long with the Raiders and Michael Strahan with the New York Giants. He introduced Long into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

References

  1. ^ "Earl Leggett NFL Football Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 5, 2016.

External links

1955 All-SEC football team

The 1955 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1955 college football season. Ole Miss won the conference.

1956 All-SEC football team

The 1956 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1956 college football season. Tennessee won the conference.

1966 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1966 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 29th year with the National Football League and the 21st season in Los Angeles.

The Rams had an 8–6 record, their first winning season since 1958, and only their second since 1955, when the Rams went all the way to the NFL Championship Game. Los Angeles finished in third place in the Western Conference, four games behind the Green Bay Packers. The Rams were led by first-year head coach George Allen, who was inducted in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2002.

1967 NFL expansion draft

The 1967 National Football League expansion draft was a National Football League (NFL) draft held on February 9, 1967 in which a new expansion team named the New Orleans Saints selected its first players. On November 1, 1966 (All Saints Day), NFL owners awarded its 16th team franchise to the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The Saints selected 42 players from every team roster except for the Atlanta Falcons, who had began play in the 1966 season. The expansion draft included future Hall of Famer running back Paul Hornung, who set an NFL record by scoring 176 points in only 12 games in 1960 for the Green Bay Packers, but did not play in Super Bowl I. Hornung never played a down for the Saints and retired in the preseason due to a neck injury.

Following the expansion draft, the Saints signed Hornung's backfield mate with the Packers, Jim Taylor to a 10-year, $400,000 contract. Taylor played just one season in his home state (Taylor was a native of Baton Rouge and was an All-American at LSU) and retired in September 1968.

1968 New Orleans Saints season

The 1968 New Orleans Saints season was the team's second as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They improved on their previous season's output of 3–11, winning four games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second consecutive season, and finished third in the Century Division of the NFL Eastern Conference.

1978 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1978 San Francisco 49ers season was their 29th season in the National Football League. The team began the season hoping to improve upon their previous output of 5–9. Instead, the team started the season 0–4 for the second straight year. The team also suffered a nine-game losing streak.During the off-season, the 49ers acquired running back O. J. Simpson from Buffalo (himself originally from San Francisco). Although Simpson had been one of the best backs in the league over the previous decade, he was in poor physical condition and had recently undergone knee surgery. As a result, his playing ability was limited.

The 49ers finished with the worst record in the league and scored only 219 points the fewest in the league in 1978. The team set an NFL record with 63 turnovers.

1987 Los Angeles Raiders season

The 1987 Los Angeles Raiders season was the franchise's strike-shotened 28th season overall, and the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League. They finished with a disappointing record of 5–10 (the team's worst finish since Al Davis arrived in 1963). It was only the sixth losing season in franchise history.

1989 Denver Broncos season

The 1989 Denver Broncos season was the team's 30th year in professional football and its 20th with the National Football League (NFL). The head coach was Dan Reeves while Chan Gailey was the offensive coordinator and Wade Phillips was the defensive coordinator.

1990 Denver Broncos season

The 1990 Denver Broncos season was the team's 31st year in professional football and its 21st with the National Football League (NFL). After reaching Super Bowl XXIV, the Broncos struggled and finished with their worst post-merger record in a 16-game season, 5-11. This mark would be eclipsed by the 2010 edition of the team, which finished 4-12.

1993 New York Giants season

The 1993 New York Giants season was the franchise's 69th season in the National Football League and the first under head coach Dan Reeves, who immediately released Jeff Hostetler and named Phil Simms as the team's starting quarterback. 1993 turned out to be the final season for both Simms and all-time Giants great linebacker, Lawrence Taylor. This would also turn out to be the first season of Hall-of-Famer Michael Strahan's career.

1994 New York Giants season

The 1994 New York Giants season was the franchise's 70th season in the National Football League (NFL) and the second under head coach Dan Reeves. The Giants failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1993 and finished 9–7 in 1994. They were second in the National Football Conference East Division, three games behind the Dallas Cowboys.In the 1994 NFL draft, the Giants selected wide receiver Thomas Lewis in the first round, with the 24th overall pick. New York began the season with a three-game winning streak, defeating the Philadelphia Eagles, Arizona Cardinals, and Washington Redskins. The Giants' first loss came in their fourth game, as the New Orleans Saints defeated them 27–22. The next six games were also losses; after the Cardinals beat them 10–9 in week 11, New York's record was 3–7. Against the Houston Oilers, the Giants snapped their seven-game losing streak by winning 13–10. The team won its next four games, moving into postseason contention following its second win over Philadelphia, which brought the Giants to 8–7. In the final game of the regular season, against the defending Super Bowl champion Cowboys, the Giants prevailed by five points. They needed a Green Bay loss as well to make the playoffs; the Packers won their last game; ending the Giants' season.Rodney Hampton rushed for 1,075 yards and six touchdowns during the season; he was seventh in the NFL in rushing yards in 1994. The Giants' leading receiver statistically was Mike Sherrard, who caught 53 passes for 825 yards and six touchdowns. Dave Brown started 15 of 16 games at quarterback, and threw 12 touchdown passes and 16 interceptions. Defensively, Keith Hamilton and Erik Howard each had 6.5 sacks to lead the Giants, while John Booty and Phillippi Sparks each had a team-high three interceptions.

1995 New York Giants season

The 1995 New York Giants season was the franchise's 71st season in the National Football League and the third under head coach Dan Reeves. The Giants finished in fourth place in the National Football Conference East Division with a 5–11 record, failing to improve on their 9–7 record from 1994.During one notable game at the end of the season, against the San Diego Chargers, Giants fans threw snowballs onto the field throughout the contest. The actions at the "Snowball Game" resulted in the ejections of 175 fans from Giants Stadium and 15 arrests; San Diego posted a 27–17 victory.

1996 New York Giants season

The 1996 New York Giants season was the franchise's 72nd season in the National Football League (NFL). With a 6–10 record, the Giants finished in last place in the National Football Conference East Division.In the 1996 NFL Draft, the Giants selected defensive end Cedric Jones with the fifth overall pick. The Giants' first game of the season was at home against the Buffalo Bills, and resulted in a 23–20 loss in overtime. After being shut out by the Dallas Cowboys, New York fell to 0–3 with a 31–10 defeat to the Washington Redskins. Against the New York Jets, the Giants earned their first victory of the season; a 15–10 win over the Minnesota Vikings left them with a 2–3 record heading into their bye week. The team then lost four of its next six games. After defeating the Cowboys, the Giants' record entering December stood at 5–7. They ended the season by losing three of their last four games. The Giants fired head coach Dan Reeves after the season, and hired Jim Fassel as his replacement.Quarterback Dave Brown started all 16 games for the Giants in 1996, throwing for 12 touchdowns and 20 interceptions. New York's leading running back was Rodney Hampton, who had 254 carries for 827 yards. Wide receivers Chris Calloway and Thomas Lewis led the Giants with four touchdowns and 53 receptions each; Calloway had a team-high 739 receiving yards. Defensively, Chad Bratzke and Michael Strahan had the most sacks among Giants players with five apiece, while Jason Sehorn had five interceptions to lead the team.

1997 Washington Redskins season

The 1997 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 66th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 61st in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 9–7 record from 1996 and finished 8–7–1, knocking them out of playoff contention for the fifth straight year. This was the Redskins' first season playing in their new stadium, Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, that would be later called FedExField. In an infamous game with the New York Giants on November 23, 1997, The Redskins missed the potential game-winning 54-yard field goal when Scott Blanton shanked the ball wide right, It what would have been a 37-yard field goal. However, Michael Westbrook was called for unsportsmanlike conduct and crazy sequences lead the redskins to their first tie since 1971.

1998 Washington Redskins season

The 1998 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 67th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 62nd in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 8–7–1 and finished fourth in the NFC East, with a record of 6–10 and missed the NFL playoffs for the sixth consecutive year. They started the season 0–7, before adding 6–3 after their bye week.

After ranking 28th out of 30 NFL teams in defense against the run in 1997, the Redskins had tried to revamp their interior defensive line during the off-season. They had signed Dana Stubblefield from the San Francisco 49ers, and Dan Wilkinson from the Cincinnati Bengals. The acquisitions, in particular Stubblefield's, were eventually considered to have been costly failures though.

1999 Washington Redskins season

The 1999 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 68th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 63rd in Washington, D.C. The team improved on their 6–10 record from 1998 to 10–6. They succeeded to the extent of reaching their first postseason appearance since 1992 and beating the Lions in the first week of the playoffs, before losing to the Buccaneers by a single point in the divisional playoff round. The season would also be the first for new team owner Daniel Snyder. It would be the final season that the Redskins have qualified for the playoffs in the 1990s and for the next five seasons, the team fell out of contention. They returned to the playoffs in 2005.

Al Darby

Alvis Russell Darby (born September 14, 1954) is an American former college and professional football player who was a tight end for two seasons in the National Football League (NFL). Darby played college football for the University of Florida, and was chosen by the Seattle Seahawks in the sixth round of the 1976 NFL Draft. He also played professionally for the NFL's Houston Oilers and Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Brad Leggett

Brad Leggett (born January 16, 1966) is a former American football center in the National Football League. He played professionally for the New Orleans Saints and the Detroit Lions.

Hinds Community College

Hinds Community College is a community college with its main campus located in Raymond, Mississippi. The Hinds Community College District includes Hinds County, Claiborne County, part of Copiah County, Rankin County, and Warren County. With an enrollment of over 12,000 students at six campuses, it is the largest community college in Mississippi.

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