ETSI

The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) is an independent, not-for-profit, standardization organization in the telecommunications industry (equipment makers and network operators) in Europe, headquartered in Sophia-Antipolis, France, with worldwide projection. ETSI produces globally-applicable standards for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, converged, broadcast and internet technologies.[1]

European Telecommunications Standards Institute membership
  Full members
  Associate members
  Observers

Overview

ETSI was created by CEPT in 1988 and is officially recognized by the European Commission and the EFTA secretariat. Based in Sophia Antipolis (France), ETSI is officially responsible for standardization of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) within Europe.

ETSI publishes between 2,000 and 2,500 standards every year. Since its establishment in 1988, it has produced over 30,000. These include the standards that enable key global technologies such as GSM cell phone system, 3G, 4G, DECT, TETRA professional mobile radio system, and Short Range Device requirements including LPD radio, smart cards and many more standards success stories.

Significant ETSI technical committees and Industry Specification Groups (ISGs) include SmartM2M (for machine-to-machine communications), Intelligent Transport Systems, Network Functions Virtualisation, Cyber Security, Electronic Signatures and Infrastructures etc. ETSI inspired the creation of, and is a partner in, 3GPP and oneM2M. All technical committees, working and industry specification groups are accessible via the ETSI Portal

ETSI technology clusters[2] provide a simple, easy to grasp overview of ETSI’s activities in ICT standardization. Each technology cluster represents a major component of a global ICT architecture and covers the work of a number of ETSI technical committees and working groups that share a common technological scope and vision. The work of a single Technical Committee may be represented in several clusters. Clusters facilitate easy identification of an area of interest based on business relevance or application domain rather than purely on specific technical work areas.

In 2013, ETSI's budget exceeded €23 million, with contributions coming from members, commercial activities like sale of documents, plug-tests and fora hosting (i.e. the hosting of forums[3]), contract work and partner funding.[4]

ETSI is a founding partner organization of the Global Standards Collaboration initiative.

Membership

ETSI has over 800 members from 66 countries/provinces inside and outside Europe, including manufacturers, network operators, administrations, service providers, research bodies and users—in fact, all the key players in the ICT arena. Nearly a third of ETSI's members are Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). A list of current members can be found here.[5]

Current full members of ETSI are from all the EU member states[6]

Current associate members of ETSI are from Australia, Canada, USA, Brazil, South Africa, Lesotho, Egypt, Israel, Yemen, Qatar, UAE, Iran, Uzbekistan, People's Republic of China (together with separate memberships for its special administrative regions: Hong Kong and Macao), Taiwan, India, South Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia.[5]

ETSI deliverable types

  • European Standard, telecommunications series (EN): Used when the document is intended to meet needs specific to Europe and requires transposition into national standards, or when the drafting of the document is required under an EC/EFTA mandate.
  • ETSI Standard (ES): Used when the document contains normative requirements and it is necessary to submit the document to the whole ETSI membership for approval.
  • ETSI Guide (EG): Used when the document contains guidance on handling of technical standardization activities, it is submitted to the whole ETSI membership for approval.
  • Special Report (SR): Used for various purposes, including giving public availability to information not produced within a technical committee. ETSI SRs are also used for "virtual" documents, e.g. documents that are dynamically generated by a query to a database via the web. An SR is published by the technical committee in which it was produced.
  • ETSI Technical Specification (TS): Used when the document contains normative requirements and when short time-to-market, validation and maintenance are essential, it is approved by the technical committee that drafted it.
  • ETSI Technical Report (TR): Used when the document contains mainly informative elements, it is approved by the technical committee that drafted it.
  • ETSI Group Specification (GS): Used by Industry Specification Groups according to the decision making procedures defined in the group's Terms of Reference. This deliverable type is approved and adopted by the Industry Specification Group that drafted it.

This list is gathered from the European Telecommunications Standards Institute website.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute)". Gartner. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  2. ^ "ETSI Technology Clusters". ETSI. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  3. ^ "What we do". ETSI. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  4. ^ "ETSI Annual Report". ETSI. Retrieved 1 February 2014.
  5. ^ a b "ETSI Membership Information". ETSI. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  6. ^ "ETSI Membership by Country". ETSI. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Different types of ETSI standards". ETSI. Retrieved 1 February 2014.

External links

3GPP

The 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) is a collaboration between groups of telecommunications standards associations, known as the Organizational Partners. The initial scope of 3GPP was to make a globally applicable third-generation (3G) mobile phone system specification based on evolved Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) specifications within the scope of the International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 project of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The scope was later enlarged to include the development and maintenance of:

GSM and related 2G and 2.5G standards, including GPRS and EDGE

UMTS and related 3G standards, including HSPA

LTE and related 4G standards, including LTE Advanced and LTE Advanced Pro

Next generation and related 5G standards

An evolved IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) developed in an access independent manner3GPP standardization encompasses Radio Access Network, Services and Systems Aspects, and Core Network and Terminals. The project was established in December 1998 and should not be confused with 3rd Generation Partnership Project 2 (3GPP2), which specifies standards for another 3G technology based on IS-95 (CDMA), commonly known as CDMA2000.

The 3GPP support team (also known as the "Mobile Competence Centre") is located at the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) headquarters in the Sophia Antipolis technology park in France.

3GP and 3G2

3GP (3GPP file format) is a multimedia container format defined by the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) for 3G UMTS multimedia services. It is used on 3G mobile phones but can also be played on some 2G and 4G phones.

3G2 (3GPP2 file format) is a multimedia container format defined by the 3GPP2 for 3G CDMA2000 multimedia services. It is very similar to the 3GP file format but consumes less space & bandwidth also has some extensions and limitations in comparison to 3GP.

Amplitude modulation signalling system

The amplitude modulation signalling system (AMSS or the AM signalling system) is a digital system for adding low bit rate information to an analogue amplitude modulated broadcast signal in the same manner as the Radio Data System (RDS) for frequency modulated (FM) broadcast signals.

This system has been standardized in March 2006 by ETSI (TS 102 386) as an extension to the Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) system.

Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications

Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (Digital European Cordless Telecommunications), usually known by the acronym DECT, is a standard primarily used for creating cordless telephone systems. It originated in Europe, where it is the universal standard, replacing earlier cordless phone standards, such as 900 MHz CT1 and CT2.Beyond Europe, it has been adopted by Australia, and most countries in Asia and South America. North American adoption was delayed by United States radio frequency regulations. This forced development of a variation of DECT, called DECT 6.0, using a slightly different frequency range which makes these units incompatible with systems intended for use in other areas, even from the same manufacturer. DECT has almost universally replaced other standards in most countries where it is used, with the exception of North America.

DECT was originally intended for fast roaming between networked base stations and the first DECT product was Net3 wireless LAN. However, its most popular application is single-cell cordless phones connected to traditional analog telephone, primarily in home and small office systems, though gateways with multi-cell DECT and/or DECT repeaters are also available in many private branch exchange (PBX) systems for medium and large businesses produced by Spectralink Kirk Telecom, Polycom, Panasonic, Mitel, Gigaset, Snom, BT Business, RTX Telecom. DECT can also be used for purposes other than cordless phones, such as baby monitors and industrial sensors. The ULE Alliance's DECT ULE and its HAN FUN protocol are variants tailored for home security, automation, and the internet of things (IoT).

The DECT standard includes the generic access profile (GAP), a common interoperability profile for simple telephone capabilities, which most manufacturers implement. GAP-conformance enables DECT handsets and bases from different manufacturers to interoperate at the most basic level of functionality, that of making and receiving calls.

New Generation DECT (NG-DECT) standard, marketed as CAT-iq by the DECT Forum, provides a common set of advanced capabilities for handsets and base stations. CAT-iq allows interchangeability across base stations and handsets from different manufacturers, while maintaining backward-compatibility with GAP equipment. It also requires mandatory support for wideband audio.

Digital Video Broadcasting

Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a set of international open standards for digital television. DVB standards are maintained by the DVB Project, an international industry consortium, and are published by a Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI), European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) and European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

ETSI Satellite Digital Radio

ETSI Satellite Digital Radio (SDR or ETSI SDR) describes a standard of satellite digital radio. It is an activity of the European standardisation organisation ETSI.

It addresses systems where a satellite broadcast directly to mobile and handheld receivers in L band or S band and is complemented by terrestrial transmitters. The broadcast content consists of multicast audio (digital radio), video (mobile TV) and data (program guide, text and graphical information, as well as off-line content). The satellite component allows geographical coverage at low cost, whereas the terrestrial component improves reception quality in built up areas. The specifications considers conditional access and Digital Rights Management.1worldspace will use ETSI SDR in its new network covering Europe from 2009. Also Ondas Media has announced to use ETSI SDR.The ETSI SDR is also similar to the Sirius XM Radio, the S-DMB used in South Korea for multimedia broadcasting since May 2005, the China Multimedia Mobile Broadcasting (CMMB) and the defunct MobaHo! service (2004-2009). The DVB-SH specifications, which the DVB Project has created, target similar broadcast systems as ETSI SDR.

Enhanced full rate

Enhanced Full Rate or EFR or GSM-EFR or GSM 06.60 is a speech coding standard that was developed in order to improve the quite poor quality of GSM-Full Rate (FR) codec. Working at 12.2 kbit/s the EFR provides wirelike quality in any noise free and background noise conditions. The EFR 12.2 kbit/s speech coding standard is compatible with the highest AMR mode (both are ACELP). Although the Enhanced Full Rate helps to improve call quality, this codec has higher computational complexity, which in a mobile device can potentially result in an increase in energy consumption as high as 5% compared to 'old' FR codec.

Enhanced Full Rate was developed by Nokia and the Université de Sherbrooke (Canada). In 1995, ETSI selected the Enhanced Full Rate voice codec as the industry standard codec for GSM/DCS.

European Committee for Standardization

The European Committee for Standardization (CEN, French: Comité Européen de Normalisation) is a public standards organization whose mission is to foster the economy of the European Union (EU) in global trading, the welfare of European citizens and the environment by providing an efficient infrastructure to interested parties for the development, maintenance and distribution of coherent sets of standards and specifications.

The CEN was founded in 1961. Its thirtyfour national members work together to develop European Standards (ENs) in various sectors to build a European internal market for goods and services and to position Europe in the global economy. CEN is officially recognised as a European standards body by the European Union; the other official European standards bodies are the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC) and the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI).More than 60,000 technical experts as well as business federations, consumer and other societal interest organisations are involved in the CEN network that reaches over 460 million people. CEN is the officially recognized standardisation representative for sectors other than electrotechnical (CENELEC) and telecommunications (ETSI). On 12 February 1999 the European Parliament noted in a resolution that CEN, CENELEC and ETSI co-operate smoothly and that a merger of the three standardisaton bodies would not have clear advantages.The standardisation bodies of the thirty national members represent the twenty seven member states of the European Union, three countries of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and countries which are likely to join the EU or EFTA in the future. CEN is contributing to the objectives of the European Union and European Economic Area with technical standards (EN standards) which promote free trade, the safety of workers and consumers, interoperability of networks, environmental protection, exploitation of research and development programmes, and public procurement. An example of mandatory standards are those for materials and products used in construction and listed under the Construction Products Directive. The CE mark is a declaration by the manufacturer that a product complies with the respective EU directive and hence the harmonized standard(s) referenced by the directive(s).

CEN (together with CENELEC) owns the Keymark, a voluntary quality mark for products and services. A product bearing the Keymark demonstrates conformity to European Standards.

GSM

GSM (Global System for Mobile communications) is a standard developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) to describe the protocols for second-generation (2G) digital cellular networks used by mobile devices such as mobile phones and tablets. It was first deployed in Finland in December 1991. As of 2014, it has become the global standard for mobile communications – with over 90% market share, operating in over 193 countries and territories.2G networks developed as a replacement for first generation (1G) analog cellular networks, and the GSM standard originally described a digital, circuit-switched network optimized for full duplex voice telephony. This expanded over time to include data communications, first by circuit-switched transport, then by packet data transport via GPRS (General Packet Radio Services) and EDGE (Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution, or EGPRS).

Subsequently, the 3GPP developed third-generation (3G) UMTS standards, followed by fourth-generation (4G) LTE Advanced standards, which do not form part of the ETSI GSM standard.

"GSM" is a trademark owned by the GSM Association. It may also refer to the (initially) most common voice codec used, Full Rate.

General Packet Radio Service

General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) is a packet oriented mobile data standard on the 2G and 3G cellular communication network's global system for mobile communications (GSM). GPRS was established by European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) in response to the earlier CDPD and i-mode packet-switched cellular technologies. It is now maintained by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP).GPRS is typically sold according to the total volume of data transferred during the billing cycle, in contrast with circuit switched data, which is usually billed per minute of connection time, or sometimes by one-third minute increments. Usage above the GPRS bundled data cap may be charged per MB of data, speed limited, or disallowed.

GPRS is a best-effort service, implying variable throughput and latency that depend on the number of other users sharing the service concurrently, as opposed to circuit switching, where a certain quality of service (QoS) is guaranteed during the connection. In 2G systems, GPRS provides data rates of 56–114 kbit/sec. 2G cellular technology combined with GPRS is sometimes described as 2.5G, that is, a technology between the second (2G) and third (3G) generations of mobile telephony. It provides moderate-speed data transfer, by using unused time division multiple access (TDMA) channels in, for example, the GSM system. GPRS is integrated into GSM Release 97 and newer releases.

Globally Executable MHP

Globally Executable MHP (GEM) is a DVB specification of a Java based middleware for TV broadcast receivers, IPTV terminals and Blu-ray players. GEM is an ETSI standard ( ETSI TS 102 819, ETSI TS 102 728 ) and an ITU "Recommendation (ITU-T J.202). GEM defines a set of common functionalities which are independent from the signaling and protocols of a specific transmission network and enables to write interoperable Java applications for TV.

GEM is not intended to be directly implemented, but rather forms the basis for broader specifications targeting a particular network infrastructure (e.g. US cable) or class of device (e.g. Blu-ray Disc players). GEM defines profiles for different device classes (targets) - these define the set of available features of GEM for this device class. Currently GEM defines targets (API profiles) for broadcast, packaged media (Blu-Ray) and IPTV. Combinations of these targets can be combined into a hybrid GEM platform, which enables to build devices with multiple network interfaces, such as a combined broadcast/IPTV set-top box.

H.263

H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bit-rate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T, and it was later extended to add various additional enhanced features in 1998 and 2000. Smaller additions were also made in 1997 and 2001, and a unified edition was produced in 2005.

Half Rate

Half Rate (HR or GSM-HR or GSM 06.20) is a speech coding system for GSM, developed in the early 1990s.

Since the codec, operating at 5.6 kbit/s, requires half the bandwidth of the Full Rate codec, network capacity for voice traffic is doubled, at the expense of audio quality. It is recommended to use this codec when the battery is low as it may consume up to 30% less energy. The sampling rate is 8 kHz with resolution 13 bit, frame length 160 samples (20 ms) and subframe length 40 samples (5 ms).

GSM Half Rate is specified in ETSI EN 300 969 (GSM 06.20), and uses a form of the VSELP algorithm. Previous specification was in ETSI ETS 300 581-2, which first edition was published in December 1995.For some Nokia phones one can configure the use of this codec:

To activate HR codec use enter the following code: *4720#

To deactivate HR codec use enter the following code: #4720#

High-Efficiency Advanced Audio Coding

Not to be confused with MPEG-4 SLS, which is branded HD-AAC.

High-Efficiency Advanced Audio Coding (HE-AAC) is an audio coding format for lossy data compression of digital audio defined as an MPEG-4 Audio profile in ISO/IEC 14496-3. It is an extension of Low Complexity AAC (AAC LC) optimized for low-bitrate applications such as streaming audio. HE-AAC version 1 profile (HE-AAC v1) uses spectral band replication (SBR) to enhance the compression efficiency in the frequency domain. HE-AAC version 2 profile (HE-AAC v2) couples SBR with Parametric Stereo (PS) to enhance the compression efficiency of stereo signals. It is a standardized and improved version of the AACplus codec.

HE-AAC is used in digital radio standards like DAB+ and Digital Radio Mondiale.

HiperMAN

HiperMAN (High Performance Radio Metropolitan Area Network) is a standard created by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) Broadband Radio Access Networks (BRAN) group to provide a wireless network communication in the 2–11 GHz bands across Europe and other countries which follow the ETSI standard. HiperMAN is a European alternative to WiMAX (or the IEEE 802.16 standard) and the Korean technology WiBro.

HiperMAN is aiming principally for providing broadband Wireless Internet access, while covering a large geographic area. The standardization focuses on broadband solutions optimized for access in frequency bands below 11 GHz (mainly in the 3.5 GHz band). HiperMAN is optimised for packet switched networks, and supports fixed and nomadic applications, primarily in the residential and small business user environments.

HiperMAN will be an interoperable broadband fixed wireless access system operating at radio frequencies between 2 GHz and 11 GHz. The HiperMAN standard is designed for Fixed Wireless Access provisioning to SMEs and residences using the basic MAC (DLC and CLs) of the IEEE 802.16-2001 standard. It has been developed in very close cooperation with IEEE 802.16, such that the HiperMAN standard and a subset of the IEEE 802.16a-2003 standard will interoperate seamlessly. HiperMAN is capable of supporting ATM, though the main focus is on IP traffic. It offers various service categories, full Quality of Service, fast connection control management, strong security, fast adaptation of coding, modulation and transmit power to propagation conditions and is capable of non-line-of-sight operation. HiperMAN enables both PTMP and Mesh network configurations. HiperMAN also supports both FDD and TDD frequency allocations and H-FDD terminals. All this is achieved with a minimum number of options to simplify implementation and interoperability.

Ingolstadt Manching Airport

Ingolstadt Manching Airport, or Fliegerhorst Ingolstadt/Manching in German (IATA: IGS, ICAO: ETSI), is a military airbase with civil usage located in Manching near Ingolstadt, Germany.

Lawful interception

Lawful interception (LI) refers to the facilities in telecommunications and telephone networks that allow law enforcement agencies with court orders or other legal authorization to selectively wiretap individual subscribers. Most countries require licensed telecommunications operators to provide their networks with Legal Interception gateways and nodes for the interception of communications. The interfaces of these gateways have been standardized by telecommunication standardization organizations.

With the legacy public switched telephone network (PSTN), wireless, and cable systems, lawful interception (LI) was generally performed by accessing the mechanical or digital switches supporting the targets' calls. The introduction of packet switched networks, softswitch technology, and server-based applications the past two decades fundamentally altered how LI is undertaken.

Lawful interception differs from the dragnet-type mass surveillance sometimes done by intelligence agencies, where all data passing a fiber-optic splice or other collection point is extracted for storage or filtering. It is also separate from the data retention of metadata that has become a legal requirement in some jurisdictions.

Programme Delivery Control

Programme delivery control (PDC) is specified by the standard ETS 300 231 (ETSI EN 300 231), published by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). This specifies the signals sent as hidden codes in the teletext service, indicating when transmission of a programme starts and finishes.

PDC (also known as Enhanced Teletext Packet 8/30 Format 2) is often used together with StarText, enabling the user to select a programme to record using specially coded teletext programme listings. The combination of features is often called PDC/StarText

In Germany and some other European countries, the older standard video programming system (VPS) is in use also known as format 2. Effectively, the two systems do the same thing and most modern VCRs and stand-alone DVD recorders work with both signals.

In digital TV (see Freeview+), the feature Accurate Recording (AR) that was based on the PDC specification for analogue recording devices is now used for a DVB-SI event based scheduling system. This was due to the BBC discontinuing the Ceefax service.

XAdES

XAdES (short for "XML Advanced Electronic Signatures") is a set of extensions to XML-DSig recommendation making it suitable for advanced electronic signatures. W3C and ETSI maintain and update XAdES together.

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