ESPN College Football

ESPN College Football is the branding used for broadcasts of NCAA Division I FBS college football across ESPN properties, including ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN3, ESPN+, ABC, ESPN Classic, ESPNU, ESPN Deportes, ESPNews and ESPN Radio. ESPN College Football debuted in 1982.

ESPN College Football consists of four to five games a week, with ESPN College Football Primetime, which airs at 7:30 on Thursdays. Saturday includes ESPN College Football Noon at 12:00 Saturday, a 3:30 or 4:30 game that is not shown on a weekly basis, and ESPN College Football Primetime on Saturday. A Sunday game, Sunday Showdown, was added for the first half of 2006 to make up for the loss of Sunday Night Football to NBC.

ESPN also produces ESPN College Football on ABC and ESPN Saturday Night Football on ABC in separate broadcast packages.

The American, ACC, Big Ten, MAC, MWC (shared with CBS Sports Network), Pac-12, SEC, and Sun Belt. ESPN began televising games for the independent Brigham Young University in 2011.[1] Through its online arm ESPN3 and the ESPN+ streaming service, ESPN carries a wide variety of other athletic conferences and games at lower divisions, spanning the full breadth of college football.

ESPN College Football set at the 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship media day
ESPN College Football at Philips Arena for the 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship media day

History

ESPN began airing taped college football games during the 1979 regular season, starting with a game between Colorado and Oregon. The network was limited to airing tape-delayed games because the NCAA controlled television rights through exclusive contracts. However, because bowl games operate outside the control of the NCAA, ESPN was able to air the 1982 Independence Bowl between Kansas State and Wisconsin live (through a simulcast with the Mizlou Television Network) – the first live football game televised on ESPN.

After the 1984 Supreme Court decision in NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma allowed individual schools to negotiate television rights, ESPN began broadcasting live regular-season games during the 1984 season, beginning with a game between BYU and Pittsburgh on September 1, 1984.[2] The first live broadcast of a regular-season night game followed that night, between the Florida Gators, who were ranked number 17, and the Miami Hurricanes, who were ranked number 10.[2]

In recent years, ESPN and ESPN2 air games at noon, which usually includes a Big Ten game. Both networks also air primetime games, typically featuring teams from the ACC or SEC.

With the expansion of ESPN, including multiple networks and outlets, their coverage has likewise increased. In 2005, with the creation of ESPNU, over 300 games were aired on its networks.[3][4]

In 2007, the ESPN family of networks aired over 450 games. Also, they aired a weekly game on ESPN Radio for the first time ever.[5] ESPN started that season with 25 hours of college football programming.[6]

Also, ESPNU has rapidly increased the coverage of spring intramural team scrimmages with entire programs dedicated to this phenomenon.[7] In 2008, ESPN aired College GameDay from Florida Field prior to their spring scrimmage game.[8]

Starting with the 2007 season, ESPN began sublicensing games from Fox Sports Net, with the Big 12 Conference[9] (later extended until 2009)[10] and with the Pacific-10 Conference.[11] However, the games cannot air during the “reverse mirror” slot.

During the 2008 season, ESPN aired over 400 games.[12]

Beginning in the 2010 season, ESPN acquired exclusive broadcast rights to the Bowl Championship Series in a four-year contract, where all games in the BCS would be aired on ESPN.[13]

Also in 2010, the company launched ESPN Goal Line, a gametime-only channel that switches between games to show the most interesting plays, similar to NFL RedZone.

In 2012, ESPN reached long-term, 12-year agreements to retain rights to the Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, and Sugar Bowl following the dissolution of the Bowl Championship Series.[14] In November, ESPN reached a 12-year deal to broadcast the remainder of the new College Football Playoff system, valued at around $470 million per-year, giving it continued rights to the Peach Bowl and Fiesta Bowl, as well as the Cotton Bowl Classic and the College Football Playoff National Championship.[15]

Programs

  • College Football Live - Daily program during the season and weekly show in the offseason
  • College Gameday - Weekly show (in-season) from the site of the biggest day of the game or significance
  • College Football Final - Saturday show reviewing the highlights of the days and the biggest stories
ESPNU programs

Former programs

  • Thursday GameNight (formerly the Weekend Kickoff Show)[16]

Coverage

ESPN airs Spring Football games and coverage.[7] Coverage includes College Football Final which wraps the annual Spring Games.[8]

During the regular season, ESPN airs pre-selected Thursday night marquee matchups. ESPN2 airs pre-selected Friday night contests from lesser known Division I schools. In late October and November, games almost exclusively from the Mid-American Conference air on Tuesdays or Wednesdays, usually on ESPN2.

The weekend games with the exception of the regular season are typically selected a week or two weeks out. ABC gets the first pick of games for all the major conferences, with the exception of the SEC, in which case CBS get their first selection.

ESPN/ESPN2 airs coverage of ABC games in a "reverse mirror" format. Both networks will also air other selected midweek games and Sunday games, typically teams from more “minor” conferences (Sunday games are exceptionally rare because of conflicts with ESPN Sunday Night Baseball and the network's professional football coverage, both NFL and Canadian football).[17]

ESPN Radio airs a weekly game as well as selected College Football Playoff bowl games including all bowl and national championship games.[18]

ESPNU usually airs 5 games per week.[19]

ESPN Classic airs selected games throughout the year.[20]

Typical games

ESPN's Saturdays during the regular season begin at 9:00 AM ET with College GameDay, a three-hour live show that previews the day's games. This counts down to the first set of games for the day, which begin at noon ET on ABC, ESPN, and ESPN2. Another set of games will begin across those three networks around 3:30 PM. At the conclusion of the second game, ABC stations will take a break for local news before the start of Saturday Night Football at 8:00. ESPN College Football Saturday Primetime starts around 7:00, as does another game on ESPN2. Late-night games (often from the Pac-12 Conference) begin on ESPN and ESPN2 around 10:30 ET, in prime time on the west coast.

Kickoff Week is the first weekend of the college football weekend. Games include the Advocare Classic, the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game and other non-conference action.[21] One game will air on ABC on Sunday night, and second game will air on ESPN on the following Monday night. After the first week of the college football season, the NFL season begins, and so these windows are filled with NBC's Sunday Night Football and ESPN's Monday Night Football, respectively.

Championship Weekend always features the MAC Championship Game and will feature the Pac-12 Championship game every other year beginning in 2013. Previously it has featured the WAC Championship Game, the C-USA Championship Game, and the Big 12 Championship game before they changed affiliates or dropped below the minimum 12 teams required for a football championship.

The ESPN family of networks air the Division I FCS conference playoffs as well as the Division II and III championship games.

ESPN and ESPN2 air the bulk of the games during ‘‘Bowl Week’’ (which contrary to its name extends to well over two calendar weeks because of the huge number of bowls, many created by ESPN's own event division, the networks air).[22]

Through the network's online arms WatchESPN and ESPN3, the ESPN networks cover the breadth of almost all levels of college football.

Non-game action

College GameDay

ESPN airs the nationally renowned College GameDay. Since 1993 and almost exclusively in recent years, it has aired from the top game of the week or one of significance. For the 2010 season, the show was expanded to three hours, with the first hour airing on ESPNU.

Home Depot College Football Awards

Since 1990, ESPN has aired the show live from the Boardwalk in Orlando, Florida. The show airs several awards.[23]

Heisman Trophy Presentation

Since 1994, ESPN has aired the Heisman Trophy from New York City. It is typically an hour-long program featuring interviews with past winners and nominees (with their families or coaches).[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ Michael Humes (2010-09-01). "ESPN and BYU Reach Agreement for Football Rights Beginning in 2011". ESPN Media Zone. Archived from the original on 2010-09-04. Retrieved 2010-09-02.
  2. ^ a b "Gators and 'Canes to Meet in Orlando for 2019 Camping World Kickoff". ESPNevents.com. ESPN. April 26, 2016. Archived from the original on August 21, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  3. ^ "Jackson set to return for 39th season - tvlistings - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  4. ^ "More than 300 games scheduled - tvlistings - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  5. ^ "ESPN Media to Provide Extensive Multimedia Coverage of the 2007 College Football Season". Archived from the original on October 11, 2008. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  6. ^ [1] Archived August 28, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ a b http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2007_04_apr/ESPNUtoFeatureExtensiveSpringCollegeFootballCoveragewithNewHooknLadderFranchise.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ a b http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2008_03_mar/20080324_CollegeGameDaytoOriginateFromSpringCollegeFootballGameforFirstTimeEverApril12.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2007_05_may/20070522_ESPNtoTeleviseBig12RegularSeasonCollegeFootball.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ College Football on ESPN#Coverage
  11. ^ http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2007_08_aug/20070808_CollegeFootballSchedule.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20100326061248/http://www.espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2008_08_aug/20080820_CollegeFootballTalent.htm. Archived from the original on March 26, 2010. Retrieved February 19, 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090818040736/http://www.espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2008_11_nov/20081118_ESPNandBCSReachFourYearAgreement.htm. Archived from the original on August 18, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  14. ^ "ESPN Reaches 12-Year College Football Agreement With Orange Bowl". Bloomberg Businessweek. Archived from the original on January 7, 2013. Retrieved 16 November 2012.
  15. ^ "ESPN Strikes Deal for College Football Playoff". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 9 January 2016.
  16. ^ "ESPN.com - TVLISTINGS - ESPN's weekly college football update". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  17. ^ [2] Archived December 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ [3] Archived December 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ [4] Archived December 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ [5] Archived December 10, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20081119034245/http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2008_08_aug/20080806_NewFranchisetoCaptureExcitementofCollegeFootballSeasonKickoff.htm. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved February 19, 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20100326060725/http://www.espnmediazone.com/press_releases/2008_12_dec/20081217_ABCESPNESPN2ESPNRadioESPN360.comCollegeFootballBowl.htm. Archived from the original on March 26, 2010. Retrieved February 19, 2016. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  23. ^ a b http://espnmediazone.com/press_releases/Other_Releases/COLLEGEFOOTBALLAWARDSDEC.7ONESPNANDHEISMANTROPHYPRESENTATIONDEC.9ONESPNANDESPNRADIO.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links

College Football Countdown

ESPN College Football Countdown on ABC (branded for sponsorship purposes as ESPN College Football Countdown on ABC presented by Walmart) is a college football television show that typically airs at 3:00 PM on Saturday afternoons during football season on ABC. The programs precedes game action on the network and has ever since 1981.

College Football Scoreboard

College Football Scoreboard is a program on ESPN, ESPN2, and ABC that provides up-to-the-minute scores and highlights during the college football season. The official name is College Football Scoreboard presented by Honda. The name of the show was College Gameday Scoreboard until 2006. It airs four times a day, at 3 p.m. ET and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN and at 3 p.m. ET and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN2. It also airs on ABC as an interlude between the 12 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. afternoon games and will sometimes air before Saturday Night Football if that game starts at 7:30 p.m. ET instead of the usual 8 p.m. ET timeslot. The 3 p.m. ET programs on both networks are thirty minutes long and the 7 p.m. ET programs on both networks lead up to College Football Primetime. However, it is subject to being, and often is, pre-empted due to earlier games running long into the show's timeslot, and often games run into each other without any kind of Scoreboard interlude.

The ESPN College Football Scoreboard was hosted by Adnan Virk along with analysis from Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer (who also appeared on the late night College Football Final). The ESPN2 version is hosted by Chris Cotter with analysis from Jim Mora and Emmanuel Acho. On ABC, it is hosted by their studio team of Kevin Negandhi, Mack Brown, and Jonathan Vilma. Both College GameDay Scoreboard groups also provide the half-time reports, post-game reports and live in-game updates from games around the country. The 7 p.m. ET versions, for both ESPN and ESPN2, lead up to ESPN College Football Primetime, which begins immediately following the show at 7:45 p.m. ET., unless otherwise pre-empted.

ESPN2 College Football Saturday Primetime

ESPN2 College Football Primetime is a live game presentation of Division 1-A college football on ESPN2.

Since debuting in 1994, it has broadcast games from numerous conferences including the SEC, ACC, Big Ten and the Big East. This game is often seen as the ESPN2 Game of the Week along with the Thursday night telecast.

On October 14, 2006, ESPN2 College Football Primetime aired on five different networks as part of ESPN Full Circle. The networks included ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, ESPN360 and Mobile ESPN.

ESPN College Football Friday Primetime

ESPN College Football Friday Primetime is a live game presentation of Division 1-A college football on ESPN or sometimes ESPN2. There is no main sponsor. The game telecast airs every Friday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. In 2018, the games will be announced by Jason Benetti and Kelly Stouffer, with Olivia Harlan as the sideline reporter. The game is preceded by a 5–10 minute long segment of College Football Scoreboard with Adnan Virk, Jesse Palmer and Joey Galloway. They both also present the halftime report.

Since debuting in 2004, it has broadcast games from numerous conferences including the SEC, ACC, Big Ten and the Big East.

The biggest game for this package occurred on September 28, 2007, when the at the time fifth-ranked West Virginia Mountaineers took on the eighteenth-ranked South Florida Bulls. The game drew a 2.7 rating, the second highest since ESPN2 began televising college football.

ESPN College Football Primetime

ESPN College Football Primetime may refer to one of several shows produced by ESPN:

ESPN College Football Saturday Primetime is the Saturday night game on ESPN.

ESPN2 College Football Saturday Primetime is the Saturday night game on ESPN2.

ESPN College Football Thursday Primetime is the Thursday night game on ESPN

ESPN2 College Football Friday Primetime is the Friday night game on ESPN2.

ESPN College Football Saturday Primetime

ESPN College Football Primetime is a live game presentation of NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision college football on ESPN. In the past, the presenting sponsors have been Polaroid, AT&T and Hilton. The current presenting sponsor is Hampton by Hilton. The game telecast airs every Saturday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. The game is preceded by a 45-minute-long College Football Scoreboard with Adnan Virk, Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer, all of whom also appear on the halftime report. This game telecast is also presented in high-definition on ESPN HD.

ESPN College Football Thursday Primetime

ESPN College Football Primetime is a live game presentation of Division 1-FBS college football on ESPN. In the past, the presenting sponsor was Cooper Tires, but since the 2006 season, the current presenting sponsor is Applebee's. The game telecast airs every Thursday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. The game is preceded by a 30-minute segment with Adnan Virk, Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer, all of whom also appear on the halftime report. This game telecast is also presented in high definition on ESPNHD.

It has broadcast games from numerous conferences including the SEC, ACC and the Big East. This game is often seen as the ESPN Game of the Week along with the Saturday night telecast.

The most visible voices of ESPN College Football Primetime over the years have been Mike Tirico, Kirk Herbstreit and Lee Corso, but none remain in the booth, with Tirico and Herbstreit being promoted and Corso cutting back on his schedule. The current commentators are Dave Flemming on play-by-play and Laura Rutledge as field reporter along with a group of rotating ESPN analysts since 2017.

ESPN College Football on ABC

ESPN College Football on ABC (branded for sponsorship purposes as ESPN College Football on ABC presented by Walmart or Kay Jewelers) is the branding used for broadcasts of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) college football games that are produced by ESPN, and televised on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) in the United States. ABC first began broadcasting regular season college football games in 1950 and has aired them on an annual basis since 1966. The network features games from The American, Atlantic Coast, Big Ten, Big 12, and Pac-12 conferences. In addition, ESPN also produces a separate prime time regular-season game package for ABC, under the umbrella brand Saturday Night Football. (ESPN and ABC are both owned by The Walt Disney Company).

List of ESPN College Football broadcast teams

The ESPN College Football Broadcast Teams are listed in the table below, including games broadcast on ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, ESPN News, SEC Network, Longhorn Network, and ESPN Radio.

Note: All ESPN games are also simulcast on WatchESPN.

Broadcast pairings for college football are weekly and are subject to change.

List of ESPN personalities

Present television personalities on the ESPN network.

List of NCAA major college football yearly passing leaders

The list of college football yearly passing and total offense leaders identifies the major college passing leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) passing yardage; (2) passing touchdowns; and (3) passer rating.

List of NCAA major college football yearly receiving leaders

The list of college football yearly receiving leaders identifies the major college receiving leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) receptions, (2) receiving yardage; (3) yards per reception; and (4) receiving touchdowns.

Eleven players have led the NCAA in one or more of these categories in multiple seasons. They are: Reid Moseley of Georgia (1944-1945); Hugh Campbell of Washington State (1960-1961); Vern Burke of Oregon State (1962-1963); Howard Twilley of Tulsa (1964-1965); Ron Sellers of Florida State (1967-1968); Jerry Hendren of Idaho (1968-1969); Mike Siani of Villanova (1970-1971); Steve Largent of Tulsa (1974-1975); Jason Phillips of Houston (1987-1988); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada (1994-1995); and Brennan Marion of Tulsa (2007-2008).

Since 1937, the NCAA record for receiving yards in a single season has been set or broken nine times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (814 yards); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (820 yards); Ed Barker of Washington State 1951 (864 yards); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1960 (881 yards); Vern Burke of Oregon State in 1962 (1,007 yards); Fred Biletnikoff of Florida State in 1964 (1,179 yards); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1965 (1,779 yards); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada in 1995 (1,854 yards); and Trevor Insley of Nevada in 1999 (2,060 yards).

During that same time, the record for receptions in a single season has been set or broken 13 times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (48); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (50); Barney Poole of Ole Miss in 1947 (52); Ed Brown of Fordham in 1952 (57); Dave Hibbert of Arizona in 1958 (61); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1962 (69); Larry Elkins of Baylor in 1963 (70); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1964 (95) and 1965 (134); Manny Hazard of Houston in 1989 (142); Freddie Barnes of Bowling Green in 2009 (155); and Zay Jones of East Carolina in 2016 (158).

List of NCAA major college football yearly rushing leaders

The list of college football yearly rushing leaders identifies the major college rushing leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) rushing yardage; (2) yards per carry; and (3) rushing touchdowns.

List of NCAA major college football yearly scoring leaders

The list of NCAA major college football yearly scoring leaders identifies the NCAA major college scoring leaders. Beginning with the 1937 college football season, when the NCAA began maintaining official records, the list includes each year's leaders both in total points scored and in points scored per game. The list is limited to players for major college programs, which includes the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (2006–present), NCAA Division I-A (1978–2005), and NCAA University Division (1956–1977).

Outstanding Live Sports Series

The Sports Emmy Award for Outstanding Live Sports Series has been awarded since 1976. Unlike the award for Outstanding Live Sports Special, this award is given to networks for a weekly series in which a specific sport is televised live.

Rod Gilmore

Rodney Curt Gilmore (born January 31, 1960) is an American college football analyst for ABC and ESPN since 1996. He works with Mark Jones on the network's Friday and Saturday night telecasts. Prior to joining ABC and ESPN in 1996, Gilmore worked for Pacific Sports Network, SportsChannel Bay Area and Prime Sports Network. He is a 1982 graduate of Stanford University, where he rode the pine for the large part of three years and received his law degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986. He was part of the Stanford team that was involved in The Play, a last-second kickoff return by the University of California Golden Bears to defeat Stanford on November 20, 1982. Gilmore speaks fluent German, and once interviewed a German football player in the language during an ESPN college football broadcast.In addition to calling college football games, Gilmore is a practicing attorney in the San Francisco Bay Area. His father, Carter Gilmore, was the first African American elected to the Oakland, California, city council; and his wife, Marie Gilmore, was elected as the mayor of Alameda, California, in November 2010.On August 15, 2016, it was made public that Gilmore had been diagnosed with blood cancer.

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