Dwight Freeney

Dwight Jason Freeney (born February 19, 1980) is a former American football defensive end who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Syracuse, where he earned unanimous All-American honors, and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the first round of the 2002 NFL Draft. With the Colts, Freeney won Super Bowl XLI over the Chicago Bears, and made seven Pro Bowls. He also played for the San Diego Chargers, Arizona Cardinals, Atlanta Falcons, Seattle Seahawks and Detroit Lions.

Dwight Freeney
refer to caption
Freeney with the Indianapolis Colts in 2010
No. 93, 54
Position:Defensive end
Outside linebacker
Personal information
Born:February 19, 1980 (age 39)
Hartford, Connecticut
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:268 lb (122 kg)
Career information
High school:Bloomfield
(Bloomfield, Connecticut)
College:Syracuse
NFL Draft:2002 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:332
Sacks:125.5
Forced fumbles:47
Fumble recoveries:4
Pass deflections:17
Defensive touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Freeney was born in Hartford, Connecticut. He attended Bloomfield High School in Bloomfield, Connecticut. Freeney was a four-sport letterman, earning four letters in baseball in which he was coached by Alphonso Ford; four in basketball; three in football, in which he played both ways; and one in soccer, in which he played goalie in his freshman year before switching over to football. Freeney holds the record for sacks at his high school and used to hold the record for most sacks in a high school career in the Connecticut record book. (Record now held by Mark Evanchick of Darien HS) Bloomfield High retired his No. 44 football jersey.[1] During his youth, Freeney idolized New York Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor.[2]

College career

Freeney received an athletic scholarship to attend Syracuse University, where he played for the Syracuse Orange football team from 1998 to 2001. A two-year starter for the Orangemen, he set a school record with 17.5 sacks in his senior season and his 34 career sacks rank second in school history to Tim Green (45.5).[3][4] Freeney was the school's premier pass rusher, and once had a string of 17 consecutive games with at least one sack. Against Virginia Tech, Freeney sacked elusive Hokies quarterback Michael Vick 4.5 times in one game.[5]

Freeney finished his college career with 104 tackles (68 unassisted), 34 quarterback sacks, 51 tackles for a loss, and 43 quarterback pressures.[6] He was a first-team All-Big East Conference selection in 2000 and 2001, and was recognized as a unanimous first-team All-American following his senior season in 2001.[7]

While attending Syracuse at a then 255-pounds, Freeney was clocked at 4.40 second 40-yard dash and recorded 40-inch vertical jump. His 40-yard time remains among the fastest ever recorded for a defensive lineman.[8]

Freeney still returns to Syracuse for his summer workouts, and serves as mentor to Syracuse players, including former walk-on Josh Arrington from the 2006–2008 season.[9]

Professional career

2002 NFL Combine

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 1 in
(1.85 m)
266 lb
(121 kg)
4.48 s 40 in
(1.02 m)
28 reps
All values from NFL Combine

Indianapolis Colts

Freeney was selected by the Indianapolis Colts with the 11th selection in the 2002 NFL Draft.[10] He set an NFL rookie record in 2002 with 9 forced fumbles, three of which occurred in a single game against former Syracuse football player, Donovan McNabb. Freeney was the runner up for the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year award.

When drafted by Indianapolis at 270 lbs, Freeney was clocked at 4.48 seconds in the 40-yard dash and the same 40 inch vertical jump.[11]

In 2004, Freeney's third season, he led the NFL with 16 sacks.[12] At the end of his third season, Freeney's season marked him as the 3rd fastest player to achieve 40 sacks. He developed a spin move which became his trademark pass rush move.[13]

In 2006, Freeney helped the Colts defeat the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI to become NFL Champions.[14]

VICKpb
Freeney attempts to sack Michael Vick at the 2006 Pro Bowl.

On February 19, 2007, the Colts placed the franchise tag on Freeney following the expiration of his rookie contract. This move allowed Bill Polian and the Colts front office time to work on a long term contract.[15] On July 13, 2007 Freeney signed a six-year, $72 million contract with $30 million in guarantees making Freeney one of the highest paid defensive players in the NFL.[16]

Freeney was fined $20,000 by the NFL for his expletive-laced interview following the end of the Colts 2008–09 playoff campaign which ended with a 23-17 overtime playoff loss to the San Diego Chargers. The NFL cited Freeney for making "inappropriate comments on officiating," according to the Indianapolis Star. Freeney, frustrated by the three defensive penalties incurred as the Chargers made their game-winning drive, told Yahoo! Sports after the game: "Those were the worst [expletive] calls I've seen in a long time ... To have a game of that magnitude taken out of your hands, it's just disgusting. It's not like they made one [expletive] bad call -- it's three calls, in overtime ... They need to start investigating some other [expletive]."[17]

In 2012, Freeney converted from defensive end to outside linebacker under new head coach Chuck Pagano.[18][19] Due to injury and not adjusting to his position-change well, Freeney struggled and finished the season with only five sacks and 12 tackles.[20]

On February 15, 2013, Freeney was told he would not be re-signed by the Colts.[21][22] Freeney left as the all-time franchise leader in sacks with 107.5, eventually being surpassed by former teammate Robert Mathis the next season. Mathis would also break Freeney's franchise record of 16 sacks in a season the following season, too, when he tallied 19.5.

San Diego Chargers

On May 18, 2013, Freeney signed a two-year deal with the San Diego Chargers.[23] During the 2013 season, Freeney suffered a season-ending injury and recorded a career low with 0.5 sacks.[24]

In 2014, Freeney looked to bounce back from the previous year and did. Throughout the season, Freeney was only used as a pass rush specialist coming out only on passing downs. Against the Seattle Seahawks Freeney sacked Russell Wilson, which contributed to a Chargers victory.[25] The next week, Freeney got a sack against the Buffalo Bills.[26] Against the 49ers, Dwight Freeney and Ricardo Mathews sacked and forced a Colin Kaepernick fumble leading to a Chargers touchdown.[27] The next week recorded one sack against Chase Daniel and the Chiefs.[28] Freeney finished the season with 10 tackles, 3.5 sacks, and a pass deflect.

Arizona Cardinals

On October 12, 2015, Freeney signed a one-year, $870,000 deal with the Arizona Cardinals, with the incentive to receive a $200,000 bonus with four sacks and then would receive $100,000 for each sack thereafter, with a maximum of 12.[29]

Freeney was named NFC Defensive Player of the Week for Week 16, in which he had three sacks and a forced fumble, the first time he had three sacks in a game since 2006.[30] Coincidentally, former Colts teammate Robert Mathis won AFC Defensive Player of the Week for the same week.[31] Freeney appeared in nine games during the 2015 season, totaling 8.0 sacks (leading the team) and three forced fumbles.[32]

Atlanta Falcons

Dwight Freeney 2016
Freeney with the Falcons in 2016

On August 2, 2016, Freeney signed a one-year deal with the Atlanta Falcons.[33] He played in 15 games, totaling three sacks.[34] The Falcons won the NFC Championship to advance to Super Bowl LI, bringing Freeney to his third career Super Bowl.[35] Freeney had one sack in the big game,[36] although the Falcons lost to the Patriots by a score of 34–28.[37]

Seattle Seahawks

On October 24, 2017, Freeney signed a one-year deal with the Seattle Seahawks.[38] After playing in four games recording three sacks, Freeney was released by the Seahawks on November 21, 2017.[39]

Detroit Lions

On November 22, 2017, Freeney was claimed off waivers by the Detroit Lions.[40]

Retirement

Freeney announced his retirement on April 19, 2018, after signing a ceremonial one day contract with the Colts to retire as a member of the team he spent the majority of his career with.[41]

Career statistics

Year Team GP COMB TOTAL AST SACK FF FR FR YDS TD INT IR YDS AVG IR LNG TD PD
2002 IND 16 41 40 1 13.0 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2003 IND 15 31 27 4 11.0 4 2 23 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
2004 IND 16 34 31 3 16.0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2005 IND 16 34 29 5 11.0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2006 IND 16 29 26 3 5.5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2007 IND 9 21 18 3 3.5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2008 IND 15 28 24 4 10.5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2009 IND 14 24 19 5 13.5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2010 IND 16 25 21 4 10.0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2011 IND 16 19 13 6 8.5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2012 IND 14 12 10 2 5.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2013 SD 4 2 1 1 0.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2014 SD 16 10 6 4 3.5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2015 ARI 11 9 8 1 8.0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2016 ATL 15 10 7 3 3.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2017 SEA/DET 9 3 3 0 3.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total 213 332 283 49 125.5 47 4 23 1 0 0 0 0 0 17

[42]

Personal life

On March 28, 2012, his financial advisor was arrested and charged with embezzling $2.2 million from Freeney.[43] In 2015, Freeney sued Bank of America for $20 million claiming he trusted the bank's wealth management division with the assets.[44]

References

  1. ^ http://www.blmfld.org/page.cfm?p=3379
  2. ^ Crouse, Karen (January 2007). "Using Quickness, Colts' Freeney Is Spinning Into Control". The New York Times. Retrieved September 20, 2010.
  3. ^ "careersacks1980". fbsstatistics.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  4. ^ "2009 NCAA Division I Records (FBS)" (PDF). NCAA. August 6, 2009. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  5. ^ "Dwight Freeney: The Official Website of the Indianapolis Colts". Colts.com. Archived from the original on May 21, 2005.
  6. ^ "Indianapolis Colts NFL Football News". ind.scout.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  7. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 24, 2012.
  8. ^ "Fastest 40 Yard Dash - Freelap USA". Freelap USA. September 20, 2014. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  9. ^ Rahme, Dave. "Syracuse University football team gets strength and conditioning blast from the past". syracuse.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  10. ^ "2002 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  11. ^ Freeman, Mike (April 14, 2002). "PRO FOOTBALL: INSIDE THE N.F.L.; Draft Mavens Are Buzzing About Freeney". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  12. ^ "2004 NFL Defense". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  13. ^ Crumpacker, John (October 31, 2009). "Smallish pass-rush duo creates big problems". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved October 31, 2009.
  14. ^ "Super Bowl XLI - Indianapolis Colts vs. Chicago Bears - February 4th, 2007". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 21, 2007. Retrieved February 19, 2007.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ "ESPN - Freeney's deal cap friendly for 2007, 2008 - NFL". sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  17. ^ "NFL fines Indianapolis Colts' Dwight Freeney $20,000 for inappropriate comments". sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  18. ^ "Dwight Freeney - Detroit Lions - 2017 Player Profile". Rotoworld.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  19. ^ Freeney: I'm not like LeBron trying to leave the team-Pro Football Talk Retrieved August 24, 2012.
  20. ^ "Dwight Freeney 2012 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  21. ^ "Report: Colts release Dwight Freeney, Austin Collie". SI.com. February 15, 2013. Archived from the original on February 17, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  22. ^ Alper, Josh (February 15, 2013). "Report: Colts won't re-sign Dwight Freeney, Austin Collie". NBCSports.com. Retrieved February 16, 2013.
  23. ^ "Dwight Freeney, San Diego Chargers agree on contract". NFL.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  24. ^ "Dwight Freeney 2013 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  25. ^ "Seattle Seahawks at San Diego Chargers - September 14th, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  26. ^ "San Diego Chargers at Buffalo Bills - September 21st, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  27. ^ "San Diego Chargers at San Francisco 49ers - December 20th, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  28. ^ "San Diego Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs - December 28th, 2014". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  29. ^ "Arizona Cardinals add pass-rusher Dwight Freeney". espn.go.com. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  30. ^ "Green Bay Packers at Arizona Cardinals - December 27th, 2015". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  31. ^ "Dwight Freeney Earns NFC Honor". m.azcardinals.com. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved November 23, 2017.
  32. ^ "Dwight Freeney 2015 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  33. ^ "Falcons agree to terms with DE Dwight Freeney". AtlantaFalcons.com. August 2, 2016. Archived from the original on August 3, 2016. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  34. ^ "Dwight Freeney 2016 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  35. ^ "2016 Atlanta Falcons Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved August 6, 2017.
  36. ^ "Super Bowl LI Box Score". pro-football-reference.com. February 6, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2017.
  37. ^ Chadiha, Jeffri. "Falcons' historic collapse leads to Patriots' fifth Super Bowl win". NFL. Retrieved August 6, 2017.
  38. ^ Boyle, John (October 24, 2017). "Seahawks Agree To Terms With Pro Bowl DE Dwight Freeney". Seahawks.com.
  39. ^ Boyle, John (November 21, 2017). "Seahawks Waive Defensive End Dwight Freeney". Seahawks.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2018.
  40. ^ "Lions awarded DE Dwight Freeney via waivers from Seattle". DetroitLions.com. November 22, 2017. Archived from the original on November 25, 2017. Retrieved November 22, 2017.
  41. ^ Walker, Andrew (April 19, 2018). "Dwight Freeney Calling It A Career; Will Retire As A Colt". Colts.com. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  42. ^ "Dwight Freeney". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved January 14, 2014.
  43. ^ "Lovers Swindle NFL All-Pro". Huffington Post. March 28, 2012.
  44. ^ Gantt, Darin. "Dwight Freeney suing Bank of America for $20 million". NBC Sports. Retrieved April 1, 2015.

External links

1999 Syracuse Orangemen football team

The 1999 Syracuse Orangemen football team represented Syracuse University during the 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Orange were coached by Paul Pasqualoni and played their home games at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York.

2001 Syracuse Orangemen football team

The 2001 Syracuse Orangemen football team represented Syracuse University during the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Orange were coached by Paul Pasqualoni and played their home games in the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York.

2003 All-Pro Team

The 2003 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2003. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2003 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

2003 Indianapolis Colts season

The 2003 Indianapolis Colts season was the 51st season for the team in the National Football League and 20th in Indianapolis. The Colts improved on their 10-6 record from 2002, going 12-4 and reached the postseason for the second straight season. After the season, quarterback Peyton Manning was named league MVP along with Steve McNair of Tennessee.

After defeating the Broncos and the Chiefs in the first two rounds, the Colts lost to the New England Patriots in the title game, which saw the first playoff meeting between Tom Brady and Peyton Manning. New England would go on to defeat the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl XXXVIII. It was the final season seeing the Colts wear their blue facemasks and white shoes.

2004 All-Pro Team

The 2004 All-Pro Team was composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2004. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2004, the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-Pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2004, the AP reinstated the “Fullback” position.

2005 All-Pro Team

The 2005 All-Pro Team was composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2005. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2005 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice which continued through 2008.

2006 Pro Bowl

The 2006 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2005 season. The game was played on February 12, 2006, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. It marked the 27th consecutive time that the National Football League's all-star game was held in Honolulu. The NFC all-stars won by the score of 23 to 17.

2009 Pro Bowl

The 2009 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2008 season. It was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 8, 2009. This was the most recent year that the game was held after the Super Bowl. The NFC defeated the AFC, 30–21.The AFC was coached by Baltimore's John Harbaugh, while the NFC's coach was Philadelphia's Andy Reid.

Bloomfield High School (Connecticut)

Bloomfield High School is the sole public high school serving the town of Bloomfield, Connecticut, United States.

Ervin Baldwin

Ervin Baldwin (born August 25, 1986) is a former American football defensive end. He has played for the Chicago Bears and Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Bears in the seventh round of the 2008 NFL Draft. He played college football at Michigan State.

Freeney

Freeney or Freeny is a surname and may refer to:

Dwight Freeney (born 1980), American football defensive end for the Detroit Lions

Jason Freeny (born 1970), American artist

Jonathan Freeny (born 1989), American football linebacker for the New England Patriots

John Teerlinck

John Teerlinck (born April 9, 1951) is a former American football player and coach.

Jonathan Freeny

Jonathan Freeny (born June 15, 1989) is an American football linebacker who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Rutgers. He has also been a member of the Miami Dolphins, Chicago Rush, Baltimore Ravens, Jacksonville Jaguars, New England Patriots, New Orleans Saints, and Detroit Lions.

Josh Thomas (defensive end)

Joshua Lloyd Thomas (born June 26, 1981) is a former American football defensive end. He was signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2004 and later won Super Bowl XLI with them, defeating the Chicago Bears. He played college football at Syracuse.

List of National Football League career sacks leaders

This is a list of National Football League (NFL) players who have reached the 100-sack milestone.

The NFL began to keep track of sacks in 1982. Sacks before this date are not included in this list.

Robert Mathis

Robert Nathan Mathis (born February 26, 1981) is a former American football outside linebacker who spent his entire 14-year career with the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama A&M and was drafted by the Colts in the fifth round of the 2003 NFL Draft. A six-time Pro Bowler, Mathis won Super Bowl XLI with the Colts in 2006 over the Chicago Bears. He is also the NFL's all-time leader in forced fumbles. The year after retiring, Mathis joined the Colts as an assistant defensive coach.

Ryan LaCasse

Ryan LaCasse (born February 6, 1983) is a former American football linebacker for the Indianapolis Colts, primarily as a special teams player. He was drafted in the 7th round in 2006 NFL draft by the Baltimore Ravens but was traded to the Indianapolis Colts. He played for the Colts on their Super Bowl XLI championship team that beat the Chicago Bears.

Syracuse Orange football

The Syracuse Orange, known traditionally as the "Syracuse Orangemen", represent Syracuse University in the sport of American football. The Orange compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Formed in 1889, the program has over 700 wins and has achieved 1 consensus Division I Football National Championship, winning the championship game over the Texas Longhorns in the 1960 Cotton Bowl Classic, for the 1959 season. Syracuse has had 2 undefeated seasons, 5 conference championships since 1991, and has produced a Heisman Trophy winner, over 60 first team All-Americans, 18 Academic All-Americans including Academic All-America Hall of Fame inductee Tim Green, and over 240 NFL players. Syracuse has had 18 members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, 2nd-most in the ACC, including former players Ernie Davis, Tim Green, Don McPherson, Art Monk and former coaches Vic Hanson, Ben Schwartzwalder, and Dick MacPherson. The Orange boast 8 inductees in the Pro Football Hall Of Fame, tied for the 4th-most of any school, including Jim Brown, Marvin Harrison, Larry Csonka, and Floyd Little.The Orange have 26 bowl appearances, 10 of which are among the New Year's Six Bowls. Syracuse has finished in the Final Top 25 rankings 21 times in the national polls, and finished in either the AP or Coaches Polls a combined 35 times since 1952. Syracuse has appeared in over 200 AP Polls including 7 weeks at AP number one.

The Orange play their home games in Carrier Dome on the university's campus. The stadium is also known as "The Loud House", as when it opened in September 1980, it was made clear just how loud it was inside; and so the soon famous nickname was coined.

Syracuse Orange football statistical leaders

The Syracuse Orange football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Syracuse Orange football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Orange represent Syracuse University in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Although Syracuse began competing in intercollegiate football in 1889, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1946, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Orange have played in five bowl games since then, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Offense
Defense
Special teams
NFL annual sacks leaders (Deacon Jones Award)

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