Dwain Painter

Dwain Painter (born February 13, 1942) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Northern Arizona University from 1979 to 1981, compiling a record of 16–17.[1] He was also an assistant coach at both the college and professional levels.

Dwain Painter
Biographical details
BornFebruary 13, 1942 (age 77)
Monroeville, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1960–1963Rutgers
Position(s)Quarterback, defensive back
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1965–1970Wall HS (NJ)
1971–1972San Jose State (assistant)
1973San Mateo JC (assistant)
1974BYU (QB/WR)
1975BYU (QB)
1976–1978UCLA (QB/WR)
1979–1981Northern Arizona
1982–1985Georgia Tech (OC)
1986Texas (OC)
1987Illinois (OC)
1988–1991Pittsburgh Steelers (WR)
1992–1993Indianapolis Colts (WR)
1994–1996San Diego Chargers (QB)
1997Denver Broncos (OA)
1998–1999Dallas Cowboys (WR)
2001–2004Frankfurt Galaxy (OC/QB/WR)
Head coaching record
Overall16–17 (college)
29–18–1 (high school)

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Northern Arizona Lumberjacks (Big Sky Conference) (1979–1981)
1979 Northern Arizona 7–4 3–4 T–4th
1980 Northern Arizona 5–6 3–4 T–6th
1981 Northern Arizona 4–7 2–5 6th
Northern Arizona: 16–17 8–13
Total: 16–17

Reference

  1. ^ 2009 Northern Arizona Football Media Guide (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 14, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2009.
1992 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1992 Indianapolis Colts season was the 40th season for the team in the National Football League and ninth in Indianapolis. The Colts looked to improve on their dismal 1991 season, where they finished 1-15.

The Colts improved by eight games, recording a 9-7 record, and finished third in the AFC East division. It was the team's first season under the returning Ted Marchibroda, who had spent the previous five seasons as the quarterbacks coach and later offensive coordinator for the Buffalo Bills; Marchibroda had been the head coach of the team from 1975 until 1979 when it was in Baltimore. Marchibroda succeeded interim coach Rick Venturi, who coached the last eleven games of the 1991 season following the firing of Ron Meyer. Venturi remained on Marchibroda's staff as defensive coordinator.

Football Outsiders calls the 1992 Colts "possibly the luckiest team in NFL history", due to ranking the Colts as the second worst team in 1992, statistically. "The Colts finished 9–7 even though opponents outscored them 302–216", Football Outsiders continued. "They were 4–7 after losing 30–14 to Pittsburgh on November 22. Then they finished the year with a five-game winning streak – but they won those games by an average of four points. ... It didn't hurt that the Colts recovered 59 percent of fumbles that season and had a below-average schedule."The Colts' 1,102 rushing yards is the lowest for any team in a single season in the 1990s.

1993 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1993 Indianapolis Colts season was the 41st season for the team in the National Football League and tenth in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1993 season with a record of 4 wins and 12 losses, and finished fifth in the AFC East division. The Colts would get off to a fast 2-1 start. However, after that, the Colts would go into a tailspin for the rest of the season, losing 11 of their final 13 games. The Colts offense was really abysmal during the season, as they would only score 189 points all season, the fewest in the league, and 3 of their 4 wins were by a 9 to 6 tally. Their only other win with not such a score was their 23-10 win over the Cleveland Browns in week 4. For the first and only time in league history, all NFL teams played their 16-game schedule over a span of 18 weeks.

1995 San Diego Chargers season

The 1995 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 36th, its 26th in the National Football League (NFL), and its 34th in San Diego.

The season began with the team as reigning AFC champions and trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 1994. After starting 4-7, the Chargers won their final five games to get into the playoffs. It ended in the first round with a loss to the Indianapolis Colts.

That game would mark the last time the Chargers would make the playoffs until the 2004 NFL season.

1996 San Diego Chargers season

The 1996 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 37th, its 27th in the National Football League (NFL), and its 34th in San Diego.

The season began with the team trying to improve on their 9–7 record in 1995. It was Bobby Ross's final season as the team's head coach, as he would take the Detroit Lions' head coaching job the following year. They missed making the playoffs by one game.

2001 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2001 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the ninth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his first year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in sixth place with a record of three wins and seven losses.

2002 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2002 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the tenth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his second year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in third place with a record of six wins and four losses.

2003 Frankfurt Galaxy season

The 2003 Frankfurt Galaxy season was the 11th season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Doug Graber in his third year, and played its home games at Waldstadion in Frankfurt, Germany. They finished the regular season in first place with a record of six wins and four losses. In World Bowl XI, Frankfurt defeated the Rhein Fire 35–16. The victory marked the franchise's third World Bowl championship.

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