Durham County Council elections

Elections to Durham County Council are held every four years. The council was created as part of the 1972 local government reforms. The first elections to the new authority were held in 1973 in advance of the council taking office in 1974. As part of changes to local government in 2009, the council became a unitary authority with the first elections to the new council taking place in 2008. Since becoming a unitary authority, 126 councillors have been elected from 63 wards.[1]

Political control

Durham was the first County Council to be controlled by Labour, who took power in 1919. Prior to 1973 political control has been held by the following parties:[2]

County Council

Party in control Years
Labour 1919-1922
Labour minority 1922-1925
Labour 1925-1973

Since 1973 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[3][4]

Non-metropolitan county

Party in control Years
Labour 1973-2009

Unitary authority

Party in control Years
Labour 2008–present

County council elections

Election Labour Liberal Democrat[a] Conservative Independent Total
1973[5] 56 6 2 7 72[6]
1977[7] 41 7 14 10 72
1981[8] 53 6 7 6 72
1985[9] 50 7[b] 5 10[c] 72
1989[10] 56 5 7 4 72
1993[11] 56 6 6 4 72
1997[12] 53 2 2 4 61
2001[13] 53 4 2 2 61
2005[14] 53 5 2 3 63
2008[15] 67 27 10 22 126
2013[16] 94 9 4 19 126
2017 74 14 10 28 126

County result maps

Durham UK local election 2005 map

2005 results map

Durham UK local election 2008 map

2008 results map

Durham UK local election 2013 map

2013 results map

Durham UK local election 2017 map

2017 results map

District council elections

Prior to the formation of the unitary authority in 2009, the county was divided into a number of second tier districts. The following articles detail the local elections to those district councils. The Borough of Darlington has formed a unitary authority outside the area covered by the County Council since 1997.

By-election results

The following is an incomplete list of by-elections to Durham County Council.

1997-2008

Bishop Auckland Town By-Election 30 March 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat 689 42.9 +1.2
Labour 601 37.4 -21.0
Conservative 318 19.8 +19.8
Majority 88 5.5
Turnout 1,608 22.5
Liberal Democrat gain from Labour Swing
Burnopfield and Dipton By-Election 28 November 2002[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Reginald Ord 519 37.2 +2.2
Labour 500 35.8 -18.3
Liberal Democrat 322 23.1 +23.1
Conservative 54 3.9 -7.1
Majority 19 1.4
Turnout 1,395 22.0
Independent gain from Labour Swing
Stanley By-Election 17 July 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Leslie Vaux 1,702 56.1 -20.6
Liberal Democrat David Rolfe 566 18.7 +4.3
BNP Dean McAdam 509 16.8 +16.8
Conservative Stuart Tilney 256 8.4 -0.5
Majority 1,136 37.4
Turnout 3,033 46.4
Labour hold Swing
Woodhouse Close By-Election 26 February 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour John Lethbridge 1,538 66.3 -2.0
Liberal Democrat Jody Dunn 782 33.7 +9.6
Majority 756 32.6
Turnout 2,320 43.7
Labour hold Swing
Durham South By-Election 26 January 2006[18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Abiodun Williams 834 51.6 +4.8
Liberal Democrat Isobell Lunan 561 34.7 -9.1
Conservative Michael Fishwick 220 13.6 +4.2
Majority 273 16.9
Turnout 1,615 34.0
Labour hold Swing
Framwellgate Moor By-Election 8 June 2006[19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour George Burlison 1,187 43.4 -5.5
Liberal Democrat Redvers Crooks 1,037 37.9 -2.9
Independent Ian Rutland 267 9.8 +9.8
Conservative Patricia Wynne 245 9.0 -1.4
Majority 150 5.5
Turnout 2,737 37.1
Labour hold Swing
Dawden By-Election 19 October 2006[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Edwin Mason 775 84.0 +4.3
Conservative Lucille Nicholson 148 16.0 -4.3
Majority 627 68.0
Turnout 923 18.7
Labour hold Swing
Ouston and Urpeth By-Election 30 November 2006[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Colin Carr 665 57.7 -2.8
Liberal Democrat Sean Kilkenny 487 42.3 +19.2
Majority 178 15.4
Turnout 1,152 18.6
Labour hold Swing

2008-2012

Barnard Castle East By-Election 4 June 2009[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Rowlandson 1,263 46.9 +4.2
Independent Anthony Cooke 634 23.5 -20.0
Liberal Democrat Michael Newlands 479 17.8 +17.8
Labour Sharon Longcroft 319 11.8 -1.9
Majority 629 23.4
Turnout 2,695 38.9
Conservative hold Swing
Easington By-Election 11 February 2010[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Alan Barker 702 55.8 -8.3
Independent Terry Murray 311 24.7 +24.7
Liberal Democrat Carole Harrison 126 10.0 -25.9
Conservative Mergaret Reid 120 9.5 +9.5
Majority 391 31.1
Turnout 1,259 20.9
Labour hold Swing

2012-2016

Crook by-election, 7 November 2013[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Andrea Patterson 741 40.3
Independent Ian Hirst 496 27.0
Wear Valley Independent Group John Bailey 360 19.6
Liberal Democrat David English 145 7.9
Conservative Beaty Bainbridge 54 2.9
Green Joanne Yelland 41 2.2
Majority 245 13.3
Turnout 1837 18.6
Labour hold Swing

2016-present

Dawdon by-election, 29 June 2017[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Leanne Kennedy 693 52.3 +6.2
Seaham Community Party Robert Arthur 633 47.7 +10.8
Majority 60 4.6
Turnout 1,329 21.3
Labour hold Swing

Notes

  1. ^ Liberal Party prior to 1981, SDP-Liberal Alliance in 1983, Social and Liberal Democrats in 1989
  2. ^ 3 Liberal, 4 SDP
  3. ^ Includes five of other parties

References

  1. ^ "Councillors - general information". Durham County Council. Archived from the original on 25 April 2010. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  2. ^ Bulmer, Martin (2015). Mining and Social Change (Routledge Revivals): Durham County in the Twentieth Century. Routledge. p. 129.
  3. ^ "Durham". BBC News Online. 19 April 2008. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  4. ^ "Local election results: Durham". BBC News Online. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  5. ^ "Labour take over metropolitan counties and 11 other councils". The Times. 14 April 1973. p. 3.
  6. ^ Including one seat vacant after election
  7. ^ "Conservatives triumphant in Greater London and Metropolitan counties". The Times. 6 May 1977. p. 4.
  8. ^ "GLC results in full: big Labour gains in the counties". The Times. 8 May 1981. p. 4.
  9. ^ "County Council elections". The Times. 3 May 1985. p. 5.
  10. ^ "County council election results". The Times. 5 May 1989. p. 5.
  11. ^ "Results". The Times. 7 May 1993. p. 9.
  12. ^ "County Councils". The Times. 3 May 1997. p. 10.
  13. ^ "Durham". BBC News. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  14. ^ "Durham". BBC News. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  15. ^ "Durham". BBC News. 2 May 2008. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  16. ^ "Results for Durham". BBC News. 3 May 2013. Retrieved 3 May 2013.
  17. ^ "Lib Dem win follows family tradition". London: guardian.co.uk. 29 November 2002. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  18. ^ "Lib Dems fail in key bylelection". London: guardian.co.uk. 27 January 2006. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  19. ^ "Burlison retains seat for Labour". The Journal. 10 June 2006. p. 35.
  20. ^ "Mixed results for Tories in council byelections". London: guardian.co.uk. 20 October 2006. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  21. ^ "News in brief". The Northern Echo. 2 December 2006. p. 15.
  22. ^ "Declaration of result of poll" (PDF). Durham County Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 February 2010. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  23. ^ "Labour maintains majority on Durham County Council with Easington victory". The Northern Echo. 12 February 2010. Retrieved 12 February 2010.
  24. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  25. ^ http://www.durham.gov.uk/media/22036/Declaration-of-result---Dawdon-division-29-June-2017/pdf/DeclarationOfResultDawdonDivision20170629.pdf

External links

1889 Durham County Council election

The inaugural elections to Durham County Council took place in January 1889. Durham was divided into 72 electoral divisions, with candidates in 32 divisions being returned unopposed. The election saw control of the council being taken by Conservative candidates, although these candidates were largely Independent conservatives as opposed to being party activists.

1955 Durham County Council election

Elections to Durham County Council were held on in April 1955. The Labour party maintained their dominance, although their presence was reduced from 77 to 74 of the councils 88 councillors.

All 29 Alderman remained Labour. Of the 74 Labour councillors returned, 48 were returned unopposed.

2005 Durham County Council election

Elections to Durham County Council took place on 5 May 2005 as part of the 2005 local elections in the United Kingdom. The election also took place on the same day as the 2005 general election. This was the council's final election before it became a unitary authority as part of changes to local government in 2009, with the first elections to the new unitary council taking place in 2008. New electoral division boundaries were introduced for this election, with 63 divisions returning one councillor each using the first past the post voting system.Labour kept control of the council with 53 seats. The Liberal Democrats were second with five seats and the Conservatives won two seats. There were also three independents elected, including two from the Derwentside Independents group.

2008 Durham County Council election

Elections to Durham County Council took place on 1 May 2008, along with other local elections in the UK. This was the first election to the unitary authority established as part of the 2009 changes to local government, and all seats were up for election using the first past the post voting system. The election saw the council double in size to 126 councillors, with 63 electoral divisions each returning two members.Labour kept control of the council with 67 seats. The Liberal Democrats were second with 27 seats and the Conservatives won 10. There were also 22 independents elected.

2013 Durham County Council election

An election to Durham County Council took place on 2 May 2013 as part of the 2013 United Kingdom local elections. Following a boundary review, 126 councillors were elected from 63 electoral divisions which returned either one, two or three councillors each by first-past-the-post voting for a four-year term of office. The previous election took place in 2008 in advance of the council becoming a unitary authority after the 2009 changes to local government. The election saw the Labour Party increase their majority on the council.

All locally registered electors (British, Commonwealth and European Union citizens) who were aged 18 or over on Thursday 2 May 2013 were entitled to vote in the local elections. Those who were temporarily away from their ordinary address (for example, away working, on holiday, in student accommodation or in hospital) were also entitled to vote in the local elections, although those who had moved abroad and registered as overseas electors cannot vote in the local elections. It is possible to register to vote at more than one address (such as a university student who had a term-time address and lives at home during holidays) at the discretion of the local Electoral Register Office, but it remains an offence to vote more than once in the same local government election.

2017 Durham County Council election

The 2017 Durham County Council election was held on 4 May 2017 as part of the 2017 local elections in the United Kingdom. All 126 councillors were elected from 63 electoral divisions which returned either one, two or three county councillors each by first-past-the-post voting for a four-year term of office.

The Statement of Persons Nominated was published on 5 April 2017.

William Ainsley

(John) William Ainsley (30 June 1898 – 23 June 1976) was a British coal miner and Labour Party politician. He was the Member of Parliament for North West Durham from 1955 to 1964.

County Durham Council elections in County Durham
Durham County Council
Darlington Borough Council
Hartlepool Borough Council
Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council
Cleveland County Council
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Durham City Council
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Sedgefield Borough Council
Teesdale District Council
Wear Valley District Council
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