Dunsany's Chess

Dunsany's Chess, also known as Dunsany's Game,[1] is an asymmetric chess variant in which one side has standard chess pieces, and the other side has 32 pawns. This game was invented by Lord Dunsany in 1942. A similar game is called Horde Chess.[2]

abcdefgh
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black knight
c8 black bishop
d8 black queen
e8 black king
f8 black bishop
g8 black knight
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
d7 black pawn
e7 black pawn
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
a4 white pawn
b4 white pawn
c4 white pawn
d4 white pawn
e4 white pawn
f4 white pawn
g4 white pawn
h4 white pawn
a3 white pawn
b3 white pawn
c3 white pawn
d3 white pawn
e3 white pawn
f3 white pawn
g3 white pawn
h3 white pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
d2 white pawn
e2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white pawn
b1 white pawn
c1 white pawn
d1 white pawn
e1 white pawn
f1 white pawn
g1 white pawn
h1 white pawn
8
77
66
55
44
33
22
11
abcdefgh
Dunsany's Chess starting setup

Rules

Black's pieces are set up identical to regular chess; White's army consists of 32 pawns, filling ranks one through four, as shown in the diagram.

Rules are the same as in regular chess, with the following exceptions:

  • Black moves first.
  • Only Black's pawns have the two-step option on their first move.
  • Black wins by capturing all 32 white pawns, while White wins by checkmating Black.

Other rules are the same as regular chess; for example, all pawns can be promoted on the final rank. Stalemate is the same as in regular chess; for example, if White's pawns run out of moves.

Horde Chess

abcdefgh
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black pawn
b8 black pawn
c8 black pawn
f8 black pawn
g8 black pawn
h8 black pawn
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
d7 black pawn
e7 black pawn
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
a6 black pawn
b6 black pawn
c6 black pawn
d6 black pawn
e6 black pawn
f6 black pawn
g6 black pawn
h6 black pawn
a5 black pawn
b5 black pawn
c5 black pawn
d5 black pawn
e5 black pawn
f5 black pawn
g5 black pawn
h5 black pawn
d4 black pawn
e4 black pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
d2 white pawn
e2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
b1 white knight
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white king
f1 white bishop
g1 white knight
h1 white rook
8
77
66
55
44
33
22
11
abcdefgh
Horde Chess starting setup

Horde Chess is identical to Dunsany's Chess, with the following differences:[2][3]

  • Black's pieces are 32 pawns, occupying ranks five through eight, but with pawns on d4 and e4 instead of d8 and e8.
  • White's pieces are identical to regular chess.
  • As in regular chess, White moves first.
  • Black's pawns on rank seven have the two-step option of regular chess.

Horde variant

abcdefgh
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black knight
c8 black bishop
d8 black queen
e8 black king
f8 black bishop
g8 black knight
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
d7 black pawn
e7 black pawn
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
b5 white pawn
c5 white pawn
f5 white pawn
g5 white pawn
a4 white pawn
b4 white pawn
c4 white pawn
d4 white pawn
e4 white pawn
f4 white pawn
g4 white pawn
h4 white pawn
a3 white pawn
b3 white pawn
c3 white pawn
d3 white pawn
e3 white pawn
f3 white pawn
g3 white pawn
h3 white pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
d2 white pawn
e2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white pawn
b1 white pawn
c1 white pawn
d1 white pawn
e1 white pawn
f1 white pawn
g1 white pawn
h1 white pawn
8
77
66
55
44
33
22
11
abcdefgh
Horde variant starting setup

A Horde variant uses the opening setup shown in the diagram.[4] In this variant, White's pawns on the first and second ranks may advance one or two steps, provided that the path in the file is free. Unlike in regular chess, this does not have to be the pawn's first move.[5]

The Lichess website has support for this variant.

References

  1. ^ Pritchard, D. B. (1994). The Encyclopedia of Chess Variants. Games & Puzzles Publications. p. 97. ISBN 0-9524142-0-1.
  2. ^ a b Pritchard, D. B. (2007). Beasley, John, ed. The Classified Encyclopedia of Chess Variants. John Beasley. p. 90. ISBN 978-0-9555168-0-1.
  3. ^ "BrainKing - Game rules (Horde Chess)". brainking.com. Retrieved 27 June 2015.
  4. ^ "Horde on Lichess". Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  5. ^ "Lichess Blog - New features: kid mode, simuls, and more". Retrieved 9 July 2015.

External links

Apocalypse (chess variant)

Apocalypse is a chess variant invented by C. S. Elliott in 1976. The players each start with two horsemen and five footmen on a 5×5 board. The two sides make their moves simultaneously.

The game was featured in Issue 53 of Games & Puzzles magazine.

Avalanche chess

Avalanche chess is a chess variant designed by Ralph Betza in 1977. After moving one of their own pieces, a player must move one of the opponent's pawns forward one square.

Balbo's Game

Balbo's Game is a chess variant invented by M. [Monsieur] G. Balbo in 1974. The chessboard has a novel shape comprising 70 squares, and each player commands a full chess army minus one pawn.

The game was featured in Le Courrier des Echecs magazine, September 1974.

Beirut Chess

Beirut Chess is a chess variant invented by Jim Winslow in 1992. The game is played using the standard chess pieces and board, with each side having secretly equipped one of their men with a "bomb"—which can be "detonated" at any time, wiping out all men on surrounding squares along with the bomb carrier.

Berolina chess

Berolina chess is a chess variant using a popular fairy chess piece called the Berolina pawn (also known as Berlin pawn or Anti-pawn). The Berolina pawn was invented by Edmund Nebermann in 1926 and has found frequent use in chess problems.

Berolina chess follows the same rules as standard chess, including castling, except that all eight pawns are replaced by Berolina pawns.

Bosworth (game)

Bosworth is a four-handed chess variant manufactured by Out of the Box Publishing company since 1998. It is played on 6x6 board and uses 4 sets of standard chess pieces.

Instead of traditional chess pieces, the "kingdoms" are represented by pictures of the pieces on large colored tokens, (each player has his own color: red, yellow, green, or blue), accompanied by a humorous picture of a Dork Tower character.

Chess variant

A chess variant is a game "related to, derived from, or inspired by chess". Such variants can differ from chess in many different ways, ranging from minor modifications to the rules, to games which have only a slight resemblance.

"International" or "Western" chess itself is one of a family of games which have related origins and could be considered variants of each other. Chess is theorised to have been developed from chaturanga, from which other members of this family, such as shatranj, shogi, and xiangqi, also evolved.Many chess variants are designed to be played with the equipment of regular chess. Although most variants have a similar public-domain status as their parent game, some have been made into commercial, proprietary games. Just as in traditional chess, chess variants can be played over-the-board, or by

correspondence. Some internet chess servers facilitate the play of some variants in addition to orthodox chess.

In the context of chess problems, chess variants are called heterodox chess or fairy chess. Fairy chess variants tend to be created for problem composition rather than actual play.

There are thousands of known chess variants (see list of chess variants). The Classified Encyclopedia of Chess Variants catalogues around two thousand, with the preface noting that — with creating a chess variant being relatively trivial — many were considered insufficiently notable for inclusion.

Chessence

Chessence is a chess variant invented by Jim Winslow in 1989. The board is a 6×9 rectangle of squares with eight squares missing (blackened out in the diagram). Each player has a king and nine men with initial setup as shown, including three men initially not yet in play at the side of the board. To win, a player must checkmate or stalemate the opponent.

Displacement chess

Displacement chess is a family of chess variants in which a few pieces are transposed in the initial standard chess position. The main goal of these variants is to negate players' knowledge of standard chess openings.

Dragonfly (chess variant)

Dragonfly (also known as Shuttle Chess or Bird Chess) is a chess variant invented by Christian Freeling in 1983. There are no queens, and a captured bishop, knight, or rook becomes the property of the capturer, who may play it as his own on a turn to any open square. The board is 7×7 squares, or alternatively a 61-cell hexagon with two additional pawns per side.

The game is an offshoot and simplification of a Freeling game named Loonybird (or Dragon Chess). Still, "Play is complex and interesting. Draws are rare too." (Wood 1994:94)

Dunsany

Dunsany may refer to:

Dunsany, County Meath, a townland and hamlet, named for the adjacent castle and demesne

Dunsany Castle and Demesne, County Meath, Ireland

Baron of Dunsany, "Lord Dunsany" or "Dunsany"

Christopher Plunkett, 1st Baron of Dunsany (1410-1463), Irish peer

Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany, the writer and playwright "Lord Dunsany"

Dunsany's Chess, an asymmetric variant of chess

Fairy-Max

Fairy-Max is a free and open source chess engine which can play orthodox chess as well as chess variants. Among its features is the ability of users to define and use their own custom variant chess pieces for use in games.Fairy-Max was derived from micro-Max (also developed by H.G. Muller), one of the smallest programs to play complete FIDE chess.

Grid chess

Grid chess is a chess variant invented by Walter Stead in 1953. It is played on a grid board. This is a normal 64-square chessboard with a grid of lines further dividing it into larger squares. A single rule governs Grid chess: for a move to be legal, the piece moved must cross at least one grid line.

Grid chess is also used in chess problems.

Jeson Mor

Jeson Mor (English: "Nine Horses") is a two-player strategy board game from Mongolia. It is considered a chess variant. The game is played on a 9×9 checkered gameboard. Each player has nine chess knights initially lined up on the players' first ranks. A player wins by being first to occupy the central square (square e5) with a knight, and then leave that square.

Knight relay chess

Knight Relay chess (also called N-Relay chess) is a chess variant invented by Mannis Charosh in 1972. In this game knights "relay" their power to friendly pieces.

Legan chess

Legan chess (or Legan's game) is a chess variant invented by L. Legan in 1913. It differs from standard chess by the starting position as well as by pawn movements.

Manchu chess

Manchu chess (Chinese: 满洲棋; pinyin: Mǎnzhōuqí), also known as Yitong or Yitong chess (Chinese: 一统棋; pinyin: Yìtǒngqí), is a variant of xiangqi. It was created during the Qing Dynasty by the Bannermen and was one of the most popular board games among them.

Marseillais chess

Marseillais chess (also called Double-Move chess) is a chess variant in which each player moves twice per turn. The rules of the game were first published in Marseillais local newspaper Le Soleil in 1925. The variant became quite popular in the late 1930s with such chess grandmasters as Alexander Alekhine, Richard Réti, Eugene Znosko-Borovsky, and André Chéron playing it.

Masonic Chess

Masonic Chess is a chess variant invented by George R. Dekle, Sr. in 1983. The game is played on a modified chessboard whereby even-numbered ranks are indented to the right—resembling masonry brickwork. The moves of the pieces are adapted to the new geometry; in other respects the game is the same as chess.

Masonic Chess was included in World Game Review No. 10 edited by Michael Keller.

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