Dukes County, Massachusetts

Dukes County is a county located in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,535,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Massachusetts. Its county seat is Edgartown.[2]

Dukes County comprises the Vineyard Haven, MA Micropolitan Statistical Area. The county consists of the island of Martha's Vineyard (including Chappaquiddick Island), the Elizabeth Islands (including Cuttyhunk), the island of Nomans Land, and other associated islets.

Dukes County, Massachusetts
County
County of Dukes County
Town Hall, Edgartown MA
Town Hall, Edgartown
Seal of Dukes County, Massachusetts

Seal
Map of Massachusetts highlighting Dukes County

Location within the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Map of the United States highlighting Massachusetts

Massachusetts's location within the U.S.
Founded1695
SeatEdgartown
Largest townEdgartown
Area
 • Total491 sq mi (1,272 km2)
 • Land103 sq mi (267 km2)
 • Water388 sq mi (1,005 km2), 79%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)17,352
 • Density160/sq mi (60/km2)
Congressional district9th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.dukescounty.org

History

Early seal of Dukes County, Massachusetts
An early seal of the Dukes County government, c. 1722, representing a crude portrayal of grapevines

The original inhabitants of the islands were Wampanoag, who had several villages. Political jurisdiction over the lands were granted by the English monarchy in overlapping claims to two different British nobles, from which Massachusetts Bay Company settler Thomas Mayhew purchased them in 1641. Mayhew established a colony in his new domain, carefully purchasing land ownership rights from the native inhabitants, and maintaining native governments to continue unimpeded. In 1665, Mayhew's lands were included in a grant to the Duke of York. In 1671, a settlement was arranged, allowing Mayhew to continue to rule while placing his territory under the jurisdiction of the Province of New York.

Dukes County was thus established as Dukes County, New York, on November 1, 1683, and included all of Mayhew's lands – Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the Elizabeth Islands. The county was transferred to Massachusetts on October 7, 1691, and at the same time Nantucket Island was split into the separate Nantucket County, Massachusetts. The 1695 incorporation statute created a county "by the name of Dukes County," as opposed to the standard form "the county of Dukes" which is the reason for the redundancy in the formal name, "County of Dukes County".[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 491 square miles (1,270 km2), of which 103 square miles (270 km2) is land and 388 square miles (1,000 km2) (79%) is water.[4] It is the third-smallest county by land area.

Nearby counties

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17903,255
18003,118−4.2%
18103,2905.5%
18203,2920.1%
18303,5176.8%
18403,95812.5%
18504,54014.7%
18604,403−3.0%
18703,787−14.0%
18804,30013.5%
18904,3691.6%
19004,5614.4%
19104,504−1.2%
19204,372−2.9%
19304,95313.3%
19405,66914.5%
19505,633−0.6%
19605,8293.5%
19706,1174.9%
19808,94246.2%
199011,63930.2%
200014,98728.8%
201016,53510.3%
Est. 201817,352[5]4.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2018[1]

2000 census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 14,987 people, 6,421 households, and 3,788 families residing in the county. The population density was 144 people per square mile (56/km²). There were 14,836 housing units at an average density of 143 per square mile (55/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.69% White, 2.40% Black or African American, 1.71% Native American, 0.46% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.48% from other races, and 3.19% from two or more races. 1.03% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.4% were of English, 13.3% Irish, 8.6% Portuguese, 6.4% Italian and 5.7% American ancestry, 93.1% spoke English, 3.7% Portuguese and 1.7% Spanish as their first language and 0.285% speak Irish at home.

There were 6,421 households out of which 28.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.40% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.00% were non-families. 32.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.70% under the age of 18, 5.50% from 18 to 24, 29.60% from 25 to 44, 27.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $45,559, and the median income for a family was $55,018. Males had a median income of $38,945 versus $30,346 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,472. About 5.00% of families and 7.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.40% of those under age 18 and 5.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 16,535 people, 7,368 households, and 4,221 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 160.2 inhabitants per square mile (61.9/km2). There were 17,188 housing units at an average density of 166.5 per square mile (64.3/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 87.6% white, 3.1% black or African American, 1.1% American Indian, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 3.9% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.3% of the population.[11]

The largest ancestry groups were:[13]

  • 18.5% Irish
  • 17.1% English
  • 11.7% Portuguese
  • 10.0% American
  • 9.2% German
  • 7.6% Italian
  • 5.5% French
  • 2.9% West Indian
  • 2.9% Scottish
  • 2.5% Dutch
  • 2.3% Scotch-Irish
  • 2.1% Swedish
  • 2.1% Polish
  • 1.9% French Canadian
  • 1.4% Russian
  • 1.1% Arab
  • 1.0% Sub-Saharan African

Of the 7,368 households, 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 42.7% were non-families, and 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age was 45.3 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $62,407 and the median income for a family was $77,231. Males had a median income of $43,850 versus $41,994 for females. The per capita income for the county was $33,390. About 5.5% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Demographic breakdown by town

Income

The ranking of unincorporated communities that are included on the list are reflective if the census designated locations and villages were included as cities or towns. Data is from the 2007–2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.[15][16][17]

Rank Town Per capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
family
income
Population Number of
households
1 Chilmark Town $45,210 $59,583 $79,688 801 302
2 Edgartown Town $38,083 $74,214 $82,583 4,034 1,466
3 West Tisbury Town $36,592 $75,759 $87,566 2,506 926
Massachusetts State $35,051 $65,981 $83,371 6,512,227 2,522,409
Dukes County County $33,228 $69,760 $82,659 16,353 5,568
Vineyard Haven CDP $30,298 $77,935 $92,112 2,465 652
4 Gosnold Town $29,511 $52,813 $61,250 183 63
5 Tisbury Town $29,384 $54,762 $60,521 3,914 1,290
6 Oak Bluffs Town $29,117 $78,890 $84,846 4,449 1,429
United States Country $27,915 $52,762 $64,293 306,603,772 114,761,359
7 Aquinnah Town $25,512 $82,500 $106,250 466 92

Political affiliation

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 13, 2010[18]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 4,920 36.43%
Republican 1,415 10.48%
Unenrolled 7,081 52.44%
Minor Parties 88 0.65%
Total 13,504 100%

Religion

Year 1980 1990 2000 2010
Religion Congregations Adherents Congregations Adherents Congregations Adherents Congregations Adherents
Catholic Church 3 2,000 3 5,000 3 9,951 3 2,896
Episcopal Church 2 871 3 562 3 608 3 473
United Methodist 6 620 6 587 5 524 2 176
American Baptist 3 279 3 403 3 461 4 456
Regular Baptist 0 n/a 1 62 1 83 1 90
United Church of Christ 1 110 1 166 1 217 1 165
Unitarian-Universalist 1 83 1 83 1 83 1 74
Assemblies of God 1 5 1 69 2 174 1 160
Friends (Quakers) 1 n/a 1 22 1 52 1 9
Church of Christ, Scientist n/a n/a 1 n/a 1 n/a 1 n/a
Congregational n/a n/a 1 300 1 295 1 331
Jehovah's Witnesses n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 1 n/a
Evangelical Christian 0 n/a 0 n/a 0 n/a 1 60
Mormon n/a n/a 1 27 1 49 1 84
Buddhist 0 n/a 0 n/a 0 n/a 1 72
Jewish 1 138 1 260 1 300 1 923
Ba'hai 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 4
Unaffiliated 0 n/a 0 n/a 0 n/a 0 10,562

Communities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other villages

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 26, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on July 4, 2012. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Dukes County, MA – An Ancient Heritage Archived May 2, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 14, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  15. ^ "SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 2007–2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  16. ^ "ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2007–2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  17. ^ "HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES 2007–2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-26.
  18. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 13, 2010" (PDF). Massachusetts Elections Division. Retrieved 2011-01-31.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved August 27, 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 41°22′N 70°42′W / 41.37°N 70.70°W

Alleghany Rock

Alleghany Rock is a small barren rock in Vineyard Sound, off the northeastern coast of Martha's Vineyard. It is part of the Town of Tisbury, in Dukes County.

Allen Rock (Dukes County, Massachusetts)

Allen Rock is a small barren rock located north of Chappaquiddick Island and about 2.5 miles northeast of Edgartown in Nantucket Sound off the coast of Massachusetts.

Bachelor Island

Bachelor Island is a small barren rock just off the northeastern coast of Naushon Island in Massachusetts. The rock is southeast of South Shore Road on Naushon Island and southwest of Monohansett Island. It is part of the Town of Gosnold, in Dukes County and the Elizabeth Islands.

Canapitsit Airport

Canapitsit Airport is a private airfield operational in Gosnold, Massachusetts.

Elizabeth Islands

The Elizabeth Islands are a chain of small islands extending southwest from the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the United States. They are located at the outer edge of Buzzards Bay, north of Martha's Vineyard from which they are separated by Vineyard Sound, and constitute the town of Gosnold, Massachusetts in Dukes County.

Elizabeth Islands Military Reservation

Elizabeth Islands Military Reservation was a World War II coastal defense site located on Cuttyhunk Island and Nashawena Island in the town of Gosnold, Massachusetts.

Gull Island Bomb Area

Gull Island Bomb Area was a former naval bomb area for aviators, located on Gull Island, in Gosnold, Massachusetts.

Martha's Vineyard

Martha's Vineyard (Wampanoag: Noepe; often simply called The Vineyard) is an island located south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts that is known for being an affluent summer colony. Martha's Vineyard includes the smaller Chappaquiddick Island, which is usually connected to the Vineyard, though storms and hurricanes have separated them, as in 2007. It is the 58th largest island in the United States, with a land area of about 96 square miles (250 km2), and the third-largest on the East Coast of the United States, after Long Island and Mount Desert Island. Martha's Vineyard constitutes the bulk of Dukes County, Massachusetts, which also includes the Elizabeth Islands and the island of Nomans Land.

The Vineyard was home to one of the earliest known deaf communities in the United States; consequently, a special sign language, Martha's Vineyard Sign Language, was developed on the island. The 2010 census reported a year-round population of 16,535 residents, although the summer population can swell to more than 100,000 people. About 56 percent of the Vineyard's 14,621 homes are seasonally occupied.Martha's Vineyard is primarily known as a summer colony, and it is accessible only by boat and air. However, its year-round population has considerably increased since the 1960s. The island's year-round population increased about a third each decade from 1970 to 2000, for a total of 145 percent or about 3 percent to 4 percent per year (46 percent, 30 percent, and 29 percent in each respective decade). The population of the Vineyard was 14,901 in the 2000 Census and was estimated at 15,582 in 2004. (Dukes County was 14,987 in 2000 and 15,669 in 2004). Dukes County includes the six towns on Martha's Vineyard and Gosnold; it increased by more than 10 percent between 2000 and 2010, according to Census data released in 2011, gaining nearly 1,548 residents. The Island's population increased from 14,987 to 16,535.A study by the Martha's Vineyard Commission found that the cost of living on the island is 60 percent higher than the national average, and housing prices are 96 percent higher. A study of housing needs by the Commission found that the average weekly wage on Martha's Vineyard was "71 percent of the state average, the median home price was 54 percent above the state's and the median rent exceeded the state's by 17 percent".

Nashawena Island

Nashawena Island is the second largest of the Elizabeth Islands of Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States. It lies between Cuttyhunk Island to the west and Pasque Island to the east. The island has a land area of 7.076 km² (2.732 sq mi, or 1,748.4 acres) and an official permanent population of 2 persons as of the 2000 census. [1] The island is part of the town of Gosnold, Massachusetts. Nashawena is an Indian word meaning "middle island". Rock Island and Baret Island are two small islands located north of Nashawena.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Dukes County, Massachusetts

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Dukes County, Massachusetts.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a Google map.There are 22 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, which include one National Historic Landmark and one National Historic Landmark District (Wesleyan Grove, which is listed twice in the register under different names).

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted July 18, 2019.

No Man's Land Navy Airfield

No Man's Land Navy Airfield was an operational United States Navy airfield from 1943 to 1950s. The airfield is located on Nomans Land island, about three miles (5 km) off the southwest corner of the island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. When it was rarely used, it was only to support propeller aircraft.

Nomans Land (Massachusetts)

Nomans Land (Wampanoag: Cappoaquit; also mapped "No Man's Land," "No Mans Land," or "No Man's island"), is an uninhabited island 612 acres (2.48 km2) in size, located in the town of Chilmark, Dukes County, Massachusetts. It is situated about 3 miles (4.8 km) off the southwest corner of the island of Martha's Vineyard.

The island was used by the United States Navy as a practice bombing range from 1943 to 1996. In 1998, the Navy transferred the island to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service for use as an unstaffed wildlife refuge. Due to safety risks from unexploded ordnance and its value as a wildlife habitat, the island is closed to all public use.

Nomans Land Range

The Noman’s Land Range was a former naval bomb range for aviators, located on Nomans Land, in Chilmark, Massachusetts.

Tarpaulin Cove Light

The Tarpaulin Cove Light is a historic lighthouse on Naushon Island, one of the Elizabeth Islands of southern Massachusetts. It is located in the town of Gosnold, Massachusetts. Built on the site of a light station first established privately in the 18th century, the current tower dates from 1891. A keeper's house built at the same time has not survived. The light is 78 feet (24 m) above Mean High Water, and its white light is visible for 9 nautical miles (17 km; 10 mi).

Tiasquam River

The Tiasquam River is a 3.7-mile-long (6.0 km) stream on the southwest of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.

The creek arises in the eastern section of Chilmark, and flows generally east, then south, into West Tisbury, Massachusetts to feed the Tisbury Great Pond, which in turn empties into the Atlantic Ocean from the island's southern shore.

Tisbury Great Pond Target Area

Tisbury Great Island Bomb Area was a former naval bomb area for aviators, located in Great Pond, in Tisbury, Massachusetts.

Trade Wind Airport

Trade Wind Airport is an airfield operating since 1938 in Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts.

Vineyard Sound

Vineyard Sound is the stretch of the Atlantic Ocean which separates the Elizabeth Islands and the southwestern part of Cape Cod from the island of Martha's Vineyard, located offshore from the state of Massachusetts in the United States. To the west, it joins Rhode Island Sound, and on its eastern end it connects to Nantucket Sound.Vineyard Sound holds some of the largest summer flounder in Massachusetts.

Weepecket Island Bomb Area

Weepecket Island Bomb Area was a former naval bomb area for aviators, located on the Weepecket Islands, in Gosnold, Massachusetts.

Atlantic Ocean
Gulf of Maine
Long Island Sound
Narragansett Bay
Upper New York Bay
Places adjacent to Dukes County, Massachusetts
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