Duffy Lewis

George Edward "Duffy" Lewis (April 18, 1888 – June 17, 1979), born in San Francisco, California, was a left fielder and right-handed batter who played Major League Baseball for the Boston Red Sox (1910–17), New York Yankees (1919–20) and Washington Senators (1921). Lewis attended Saint Mary's College of California.

Duffy Lewis
Duffy Lewis Baseball
Left fielder
Born: April 18, 1888
San Francisco, California
Died: June 17, 1979 (aged 91)
Salem, New Hampshire
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1910, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
June 6, 1921, for the Washington Senators
MLB statistics
Batting average.284
Home runs38
Runs batted in793
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Biography

BoSox Outfield.JPEG
Duffy Lewis, Tris Speaker and Harry Hooper — Boston's famous "Million-Dollar Outfield"

In Boston, Lewis belonged to the outfield trio which included Tris Speaker (CF) and Harry Hooper (RF) and is considered perhaps the best ever in fielding skill. At bat, Lewis was a renowned line-drive hitter who consistently finished in the top ten in most offensive categories despite a short career which was interrupted by World War I (Duffy served as a petty officer in the US Navy).[1]

In 11 seasons, Lewis batted .284 with 38 home runs, 793 RBI, 612 runs, 1,518 hits, 289 doubles, 68 triples, and 113 stolen bases in 1,459 games. In three World Series covering 18 games for the Red Sox, Lewis posted a .299 average (20-for-67) with 8 runs, 1 home run and 7 RBI.

During his tenure in Boston patrolling left field, Fenway Park featured a ten-foot-high mound that formed an incline in front of the left field wall, now better known as the Green Monster. The young outfielder mastered the incline to such an extent that it was nicknamed "Duffy's Cliff".[2] Sports cartoons of the period often depicted him as a mountain climber making catches amid sheep and snowcaps. The mound was eventually reduced in 1934, long after Lewis had left the Sox, and was not completely eliminated until the field underwent a major renovation following the 2004 season.

Duffy Lewis died in Salem, New Hampshire at 91 years of age. He was selected to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002.

References

  1. ^ "Through the camera's eye". Evening Star. Washington, D.C. April 14, 1918. Retrieved February 5, 2016.
  2. ^ Dickson, Paul (1989). The Dickson Baseball Dictionary. United States: Facts on File. p. 140. ISBN 0816017417.

External links

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1911 Boston Red Sox season

The 1911 Boston Red Sox season was the eleventh season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the final season that the team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds, before moving to Fenway Park.

1912 Boston Red Sox season

The 1912 Boston Red Sox season was the twelfth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. This was the first year that the team played its home games at Fenway Park. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 105 wins and 47 losses. The team set the franchise record for highest winning percentage (.691) in a season, which still stands; tied the franchise record for fewest losses in a season, originally set by the 1903 club and not since equalled; and set a franchise record for most wins, which was not surpassed until the 2018 club.The team then faced the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1912 World Series, which the Red Sox won in eight games to capture the franchise's second World Series. One of the deciding plays in the World Series was a muffed fly ball by Giants outfielder Fred Snodgrass, which became known as the "$30,000 muff" in reference to the prize money for the winning team.Behind center fielder Tris Speaker and pitcher Smoky Joe Wood, the Red Sox led the league in runs scored and fewest runs allowed. Speaker was third in batting and was voted league Most Valuable Player. Wood won 34 games, including a record 16 in a row. Although the pitching staff was satisfactory, the only star pitcher was Wood, while the only star in the starting lineup was Speaker. Little-known third baseman Larry Gardner was the next best hitter, while future Hall of Famer Harry Hooper had a poor offensive season.

1913 Boston Red Sox season

The 1913 Boston Red Sox season was the thirteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 71 losses.

1914 Boston Red Sox season

The 1914 Boston Red Sox season was the fourteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 62 losses.

1915 Boston Red Sox season

The 1915 Boston Red Sox season was the fifteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 101 wins and 50 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies in the 1915 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's third World Series.

1915 World Series

In the 1915 World Series, the Boston Red Sox beat the Philadelphia Phillies four games to one.

In their only World Series before 1950, the Phillies won Game 1 before being swept the rest of the way. It was 65 years before the Phillies won their next Series game. The Red Sox pitching was so strong in the 1915 series that the young Babe Ruth was not used on the mound and only made a single pinch-hitting appearance.

1916 Boston Red Sox season

The 1916 Boston Red Sox season was the sixteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 63 losses. The team then faced the National League (NL) champion Brooklyn Robins in the 1916 World Series, which the Red Sox won in five games to capture the franchise's second consecutive and fourth overall World Series.

1917 Boston Red Sox season

The 1917 Boston Red Sox season was the seventeenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 90 wins and 62 losses.

1919 New York Yankees season

The 1919 New York Yankees season was the 17th season for the Yankees in New York and its 19th overall. The team finished with a record of 80–59, 7½ games behind the American League champion Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

1920 New York Yankees season

The 1920 New York Yankees season was the 18th season for the Yankees in New York and their 20th overall. The team finished with a record of 95–59, just 3 games behind the American League champion Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Home games were played at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees of 1920 were the first team in the history of Major League Baseball to have an attendance of more than one million fans.

Assist (baseball)

In baseball, an assist (denoted by A) is a defensive statistic, baseball being one of the few sports in which the defensive team controls the ball. An assist is credited to every defensive player who fields or touches the ball (after it has been hit by the batter) prior to the recording of a putout, even if the contact was unintentional. For example, if a ball strikes a player's leg and bounces off him to another fielder, who tags the baserunner, the first player is credited with an assist. A fielder can receive a maximum of one assist per out recorded. An assist is also credited if a putout would have occurred, had another fielder not committed an error. For example, a shortstop might field a ground ball cleanly, but the first baseman might drop his throw. In this case, an error would be charged to the first baseman, and the shortstop would be credited with an assist.

If a pitcher records a strikeout where the third strike is caught by the catcher, the pitcher is not credited with an assist. However, if the batter becomes a baserunner on a dropped third strike and the pitcher is involved in recording a putout by fielding the ball and either tagging the runner out or throwing to first base for the out, the pitcher is credited with an assist just as any other fielder would be.

Assists are an important statistic for outfielders, as a play often occurs when a baserunner on the opposing team attempts to advance on the basepaths when the ball is hit to the outfield (even on a caught fly ball that results in an out; see tag up). It is the outfielder's job to field the ball and make an accurate throw to another fielder who is covering the base before the runner reaches it. The fielder then attempts to tag the runner out. This is especially important if the runner was trying to reach home plate, as the assist and tag prevent the baserunner from scoring a run. Assists are much rarer for outfielders than infielders (with the exception of first basemen) because the play is harder to make, and also because outfielder assist situations occur less often than the traditional ground-ball assist for a shortstop, second baseman, or third baseman. However, as a result, outfield assists are worth far more than infield assists, and tell more about an outfielder's throwing arm than infielder assists do.

In recent years, some sabermetricians have begun referring to assists by outfielders as baserunner kills. Some sabermetricians are also using baserunner holds as a statistic to measure outfield arms.

A baserunner hold occurs when the baserunner does not attempt to advance an extra base on an outfielder out of concern of being thrown out by a strong, accurate throw. This can be combined with baserunner kills for better accuracy, as runners often do not try for an extra base when an outfielder with an excellent arm is playing.

Duffy (nickname)

Duffy is the nickname of:

Duffy Ayers, English portrait painter born Elizabeth (Betty) Fitzgerald in 1915

Duffy Cobbs (born 1964), American former football player

Duffy Daugherty (1915-1987), American college football player and Hall of Fame coach

Duffy Dyer (born 1945), American former Major League Baseball player

Duffy Jackson (born 1953), American jazz drummer

Duffy Lewis (1888-1979), American Major League Baseball player

Norma Lyon (1929–2011), American farmer and butter sculptor

Golden Outfield

The Golden Outfield, also called the Million Dollar Outfield, were the three starting outfielders of the Major League Baseball Boston Red Sox from 1910 through 1915, considered one of the greatest outfields of all time. The three members of the Golden Outfield were left fielder Duffy Lewis, center fielder Tris Speaker and right fielder Harry Hooper. The three helped the Red Sox win two World Series titles, in 1912 and 1915. Two members of the Golden Outfield, Speaker and Hooper, are enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame. All three were effective hitters, but were especially known for their fielding skill. Baseball writer Grantland Rice said that they were "the greatest defensive outfield I ever saw...They were smart and fast. They covered every square inch of the park – and they were like three fine infielders on ground balls. They could move into another country, if the ball happened to fall there." Speaker, Hooper, and Lewis all had powerful throwing arms, as well. Both Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth said that it was the best outfield that they had ever seen.The Golden Outfield was broken up when Speaker was traded to the Cleveland Indians prior to the 1916 season after a salary dispute with Red Sox owner Joseph Lannin.

Green Monster

The Green Monster is a popular nickname for the 37.2 feet (11.3 m) high left field wall at Fenway Park, home to the Boston Red Sox baseball team. The wall is 310 feet (94.5 meters) from home plate and is a popular target for right-handed hitters.

Harry Hooper

Harry Bartholomew Hooper (August 24, 1887 – December 18, 1974) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder in the early 20th century. Hooper batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Hooper was born in Bell Station, California, and he graduated from St. Mary's College of California. He played for major league teams between 1909 and 1925, spending most of that time with the Boston Red Sox and finishing his career with the Chicago White Sox.

Hooper was often known for his defensive skills and he was among the league leaders in defensive categories such as putouts by a right fielder. During several seasons with Boston, he teamed up with Duffy Lewis and Tris Speaker to form the Golden Outfield, one of the best outfield trios in baseball history. Hooper is also one of only two members of four separate Red Sox World Series championship teams (1912, 1915, 1916, 1918). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a left fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

In baseball, a left fielder (LF) is an outfielder who plays defense in left field. Left field is the area of the outfield to the left of a person standing at home plate and facing towards the pitcher's mound. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the left fielder is assigned the number 7.

Goose Goslin and Zack Wheat are the all-time leaders in errors committed by a left fielder with 183 career. Lou Brock (168), Bobby Veach (146), Duffy Lewis (123), Bob Johnson (121), Jack Graney (114), Rickey Henderson (113), Ken Williams (109), and Charlie Jamieson (104) are the only other left fielders to commit over 100 career errors.

Salt Lake City Bees

The Salt Lake City Bees were a minor league baseball club, based in Salt Lake City, Utah from 1911 until 1984, under various names. The Bees were long-time members of both the Pacific Coast League and Pioneer League. The team played their home games at Derks Field.

The direct predecessor to the Bees were the Salt Lake City Skyscrapers that played in the class-D Union Association from 1911–1914. The Association folded after the 1914 season. However, in 15, the San Francisco Missions were sold to Utah businessman Bill "Hardpan" Lane who moved the team to Salt Lake City. The club was named the Bees from 1915–1925. Due to the high altitude and the dimensions of the club's Bonneville Park stadium, the Bees recorded some of the best batting records in the PCL during this period.The club was named the Bees name from 1915–1925. However Lane moved the team to Los Angeles for the 1926 season. Originally they were known as the Hollywood Bees, but soon changed their name to the Hollywood Stars.

The Bees' baseball was still available though in the city with Salt Lake City's team in the Utah–Idaho League from 1926–1928. The team won its first title in their final 1928 season. In 1939 the third incarnation of the Bees was formed and played in the Pioneer League, winning titles in 1946 and 1953. The city returned to the Pacific Coast league from 1958–1965, winning the league title in 1959.

From 1967–1968, the city was represented by Salt Lake City Giants again played in the Pioneer League, now a rookie-level class league. The team was affiliated with the San Francisco Giants The team played the 1969 and 1970 seasons renamed as the Bees.

After their 1969, the club returned to Triple-A status and the Pacific Coast League. In 1971 the club was renamed the Salt Lake City Angels, when they became the affiliate of the California Angels through the 1974 season. In their first season as the Angels, the club won the southern division of the Pacific Coast League with a 78-68 record. The team would then go on to defeat the Tacoma Twins 3 games to 1 to claim the league pennant. The team was renamed the Salt Lake City Gulls in 1975 but remained as the Angels' top affiliate through the 1981 season. In 1979, the team were able to sweep the Hawaii Islanders and capture their final league title.

In 1982, The Gulls switched to the Seattle Mariners organization. Following the 1984 season, the team was relocated to Calgary, Alberta, and became the Calgary Cannons in 1985.The current minor league team in the city, the Salt Lake Buzz chose their name in part to pay homage to the Bees heritage. In November 2005, the Buzz, now the Salt Lake Stingers, changed their name to the Salt Lake Bees, reviving the name once again.

Wally Rehg

Walter Phillip Rehg (August 31, 1888 – April 5, 1946) was a reserve outfielder in Major League Baseball, playing mostly as a right fielder for four different teams between the 1912 and 1919 seasons. Listed at 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m), 160 lb., Rehg batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Summerfield, Illinois.

Rehg entered the majors in 1912 with the Pittsburgh Pirates, playing for them one year before joining the Boston Red Sox (1913–1915), Boston Braves (1917–1918) and Cincinnati Reds (1919). He appeared in a career-high 88 games with the 1914 Red Sox, as a backup for the

fabled Million-Dollar Outfield of Duffy Lewis (LF), Tris Speaker (CF) and Harry Hooper (RF). His most productive season came in 1917 with the Braves, when he posted career-numbers in batting average (.270), runs (48), RBI (31) and stolen bases (13), while appearing in 87 games. He also was a member of the 1919 National League champions Reds, although he did not play in the World Series.

In a seven-season career, Rehg was a .250 hitter (188-for-752) with two home runs and 66 RBI in 263 games, including 85 runs, 24 doubles, 11 triples and 26 stolen bases.

In between major league stops, Rehg saw regular action in the minor leagues at St. Paul and Providence, and also served in the United States Navy in 1918 during World War I. He also played in the minors from 1920 through 1930, mostly for Triple-A Indianapolis Indians, and managed the Tucson team of the Arizona State League in his last baseball season.

Besides baseball, Rehg appeared in the films Fast Company (1929), playing himself, and as an uncredited ballplayer in Alibi Ike (1935), a baseball comedy starred by Joe Brown and Olivia de Havilland.

Following his baseball career, Rehg worked as an electrician helper at Paramount Pictures Studios. He died on April 5, 1946, in Burbank, California, at the age of 57.

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