Droylsden

Droylsden is a town in Greater Manchester, England, 4.1 miles (6.6 km) east of Manchester city centre and 2.2 miles (3.5 km) west of Ashton-under-Lyne, with a population at the 2011 Census of 22,689.[1]

Historically in Lancashire, in the mid-19th century Droylsden grew as a mill town on the Ashton canal. Beginning in the early 1930s, Droylsden's population expanded rapidly as it became a housing overflow area for neighbouring Manchester.

Since 1785, the Fairfield area of Droylsden has been home to a Moravian Church.[2]

Droylsden
DroysldenTownCentre

Droylsden town centre
Droylsden is located in Greater Manchester
Droylsden
Droylsden
Location within Greater Manchester
Population22,689 (2011 Census)
OS grid referenceSJ8998
• London161 miles (259 km) SSE
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townMANCHESTER
Postcode districtM43
Dialling code0161
PoliceGreater Manchester
FireGreater Manchester
AmbulanceNorth West
EU ParliamentNorth West England
UK Parliament

History

AshtonCanalDroylsden
The Ashton Canal through Droylsden

Droylsden was settled around AD 900. Before Droylsden became a part of Greater Manchester, it was popularly referred to by Mancunians as "The Silly Country".[3] One suggestion as to the source of that nickname is that once a year, some of the townsfolk used to watch an annual carnival by bringing a pig and sitting it on a wall to watch the passing entertainment with them. The Pig on the Wall public house, converted from a farm in 1978, takes its name from that story.

The first machine woven towel in the world – the terry towel – was produced by W. M. Christy and Sons of Fairfield Mills, in Droylsden, in 1851. William Miller Christy's son, Henry Christy, had brought back a looped towel from Turkey in the 1840s, which Christy's managed to copy on an adapted loom. Their Royal Turkish towels became famous, with Queen Victoria having a regular order. The mill closed at the end of the 1980s, and in 1997 Tesco opened a supermarket on the site.[4]

Construction of a marina began in March 2007, it is expected to be complete in 2012. The marina will have 92 three and four-bedroom houses, and 291 one and two-bedroom apartments as well as waterside offices, restaurants, and shops.[5]

Geography

Droylsden is in Tameside
A welcome sign at Droyslden's boundary

Droylsden is located at 53°28′58″N 2°9′30″W / 53.48278°N 2.15833°W (53.4826, −2.1582), about 4 miles (6 km) to the east of Manchester city centre, close to Ashton-under-Lyne, Clayton, Openshaw and Newton Heath. The climate of Droylsden is unique to other areas in Manchester in that it has a Tropical Savannah clinate with little variation year round, snow has never been recorded in Droylsden. Due to the climate exotic plant life can be found in Droylsden such as the coconut, banana, olive & palm. There is a factory in the Medlock valley that produces award winning extra virgin olive oil from the surrounding olive groves that line the Medlock valley. Vineyards are also located in the valley which bottle fine wines.

Transport

Droylsden is not directly served by railway with the nearest station being Fairfield railway station approximately 1 mile south of the town centre, providing a service to Manchester Piccadilly and Rose Hill Marple. The town's former railway station was open between 1846 and 1968 and located on Lumb Lane, approximately 1 mile north of the town centre on the Huddersfield Line. The nearest station on this line is Ashton-under-Lyne.

From 2013, Droylsden became a terminus on the East Manchester line of the Manchester Metrolink tram network, with services running to Manchester and Bury.[6] Trams now run from Droylsden to Ashton-under-Lyne via Audenshaw and Ashton Moss.[7]

The town has frequent bus services, the majority operated by Stagecoach Manchester, including the high frequency 216 service running between Manchester city centre and Ashton-under-Lyne.

Education

In January 2009, the closure of Droylsden School Mathematics and Computing College for Girls and Littlemoss High School for Boys was approved by Tameside Council. This was conditional on the Secretary of State signing an Academy Funding Agreement by 30 April 2009 for the two schools to be replaced by Droylsden Academy. Droylsden Academy, which was sponsored by Tameside College, opened in September 2009, in the existing buildings of the two former schools. The new Droylsden Academy building opened on the school site of Droylsden School Mathematics and Computing College for Girls in January 2012.[8]

Fairfield High School for Girls was unaffected by these changes and has been granted Specialist Science College status.

Tameside College also operates a Local Learning Centre for adult learners in Droylsden.

Governance

DroylsdenArms
Arms of the former Droylsden Urban District Council

Droylsden was anciently a chapelry in the parish of Manchester, within the historic county boundaries of Lancashire.[9] It became an urban district of the administrative county of Lancashire under the Local Government Act 1894, and was granted its arms on 16 October 1950.[10] In 1974, as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, Droylsden became a part of the Metropolitan Borough of Tameside within the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester.

Droylsden was once a large township, including Big Droylsden, Little Droylsden, and Clayton. In 1889 Little Droylsden was subsumed into Openshaw, and in 1890 Clayton was ceded from Droylsden's control to become part of Manchester.[4]

From 1918 until 1950, Droylsden was represented by the parliamentary constituency of Mossley. Manchester's expansion to the east and the increase in the electorate, resulted in the seat being divided in the 1950 boundary change. The areas adjacent to Manchester, including Droylsden, formed the new Droylsden constituency, with the remainder forming part of Ashton-under-Lyne. The Droylsden constituency was abolished in 1955, when Droylsden itself became part of the Ashton-under-Lyne constituency.

David Heyes MP represented the constituency of Ashton-under-Lyne from 2001 to 2015. He was replaced by his fellow Labour Party member Angela Rayner in the 2015 UK General Election.

Culture

The Droylsden Little Theatre has been running amateur productions since 1931.[11]

Population change

Population growth in Droylsden since 1801
Year 1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1921 1931 1939 1951 1961 1971 2001 2011
Population 1,552 2,201 2,855 2,996 4,933 6,280 8,798 8,973 8,679 9,482 11,087 13,259 13,878 13,274 25,279 26,363 25,461 24,167 23,172 22,834
Source:A Vision of Britain through Time[12]

Economy

Robertson's Jam Factory, Droylsden, 2005
Robertson's Jam Factory

During the 1930s, Droylsden's population expanded rapidly, as it became a housing overflow area for Manchester. Today the area is predominately occupied by employed home owners.

Robertson's Jam was a significant employer in the area. The factory was established in 1891, on the banks of the Ashton Canal, on Ashton Hill Lane. At its peak it employed around 1,000 workers; that number was reduced to around 400 before closing during 2008. The factory was demolished during the early part of 2010.

Sport

Droylsden is home to Droylsden F.C. who won the Conference North league in 2006–07, gaining promotion to the Conference National for the 2007–08 season, although they were relegated back to Conference North for 2008–09, and into the Northern Premier League Premier Division in 2012–13. Now Droylsden play in the Northern Premier League Division One North.

Droylsden is one of a number of locations which are promoted as the birthplace of speedway racing in the UK. Britain's first ever Speedway meeting was staged in Droylsden on 25 June 1927, billed as dirt track racing.

Notable people

England's rugby union captain from 1956 to 1958, Eric Evans MBE, was born in Droylsden in 1921. Harry Pollitt, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Great Britain, was born in the town in 1890.[13]

Rev Arthur Herbert Procter, Victoria Cross recipient, was Rector of St Mary's parish church from 1946 to 1951.[14] A Blue Plaque is at the church.

James Ellor was born in Droylsden on 26 November 1819. At the age of 19, he composed one of the most popular Protestant hymn tunes, Diadem, for the words "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name" by Edward Perronet. Ellor was a hatter by trade and emigrated to USA in 1843.

Scott Bruton, X Factor finalist in 2008, was raised in the town. Other famous people who grew up in the town include pop stars Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits, 10cc's Eric Stewart, Howard Donald of Take That, cult author Jeff Noon, actress Stephanie Bishop who starred in the Ken Loach movie Looking for Eric, professional boxer Prince Arron, and the musician known as "Damian".

Cyril Lord (1911-1984), 'the Carpet King', was born and raised in Droylsden. He later established a huge carpet factory in Donaghadee, County Down, in Ulster.

James Evans was born in Droylsden in 1987 and is a highly successful freelance toothbrush designer.

Twin Town

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ "2011 census for Droylsden". Archived from the original on 4 February 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  2. ^ "Moravian Atlas UK Congregation Locations 2003". Moravian Church in the British Province. Archived from the original on 17 June 2007. Retrieved 16 May 2007.
  3. ^ "Memories of the Hollinwood Branch Canal (2)". Hollinwood Canal Society. Retrieved 16 May 2007.
  4. ^ a b "Facts about Droylsden". Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council. Archived from the original on 26 September 2007. Retrieved 17 June 2007.
  5. ^ David Thame (22 November 2007). "Ashton's mall on the up". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved on 4 September 2008.
  6. ^ "It's the final countdown". Transport for Greater Manchester. Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  7. ^ "East Manchester line". Metrolink. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  8. ^ "Background and vision". About us. Droylsden Academy. Retrieved 28 December 2012.
  9. ^ "Droylsden". GENUKI. Retrieved 17 June 2007.
  10. ^ "Civic Heraldry of England & Wales". Retrieved 20 May 2007.
  11. ^ "Droylesden Little Theatre", Droylsden Little Theatre list of productions, retrieved 25 July 2011
  12. ^ Nevell (1993), p. 12.
  13. ^ "A Tribute to Harry Pollitt, 1890–1960". The Tameside Citizen. 12 September 2007. Retrieved 5 October 2008.
  14. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory, 1971–72. Oxford University Press. p. 779.

Bibliography

2007 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Tameside Council were held on 4 May 2007. One third of the council was up for election, with each successful candidate to serve a four-year term of office, expiring in 2011. The Labour Party retained overall control of the council.

After the election, the composition of the council was

Labour 45

Conservative 8

Liberal Democrats Audenshaw Focus Team 1

Others 3

2010 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Tameside Council were held on 6 May 2010. One third of the council was up for election, with each successful candidate to serve a four-year term of office, expiring in 2014. The Labour Party retained overall control of the council.

2011 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

Elections to Tameside Council were held on 5 May 2011. One third of the council was up for election, with each successful candidate to serve a four-year term of office, expiring in 2015. The Labour Party retained overall control of the council.

2012 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2012 Tameside Council election took place on 3 May 2012 to elect members of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other United Kingdom local elections, 2012.

One third of the council was up for election, with councillors elected in Tameside Council election, 2008 defending their seats with vote share changes calculated on that basis.

2014 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2014 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 22 May 2014 to elect members of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

2015 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2015 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

2016 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2016 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2016 to elect members of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 51

Conservative 6

2018 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2018 Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2018 to elect members of Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections.

Butcher's Arms Ground

Butcher's Arms Ground is a multi-use stadium in Droylsden, Tameside, Greater Manchester, England. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of Droylsden F.C.. The stadium has a capacity of 3,000 people both seated and standing and is nicknamed "The Slaughterhouse" or "Abattoir" by fans. The Butchers reference is celebrated at a designated home game once a year, when the stadium floor is sprinkled with saw dust and fans are invited to wear white overalls and hairnets. During Droylsden's recent F.A. Cup tie against Leyton Orient, broadcast live on ESPN, two fans invaded the pitch at the end of the match dressed as butchers. It has partial or full cover on three sides of the pitch, terracing on four sides and seating along the centre of one side, plus a public house.

The ground is named after the Butcher's Arms public house, whose landlord in 1892 instigated the formation of Droylsden FC to play on land behind the pub, which became the ground. After the Second World War the lease of the Butchers Arms was sold to Belle Vue F.C., who renamed themselves Droylsden United. And that club took over playing at the ground, forcing Drolysden to move to the nearby Moorside Trotting Stadium. However, the town wasn't big enough for two clubs, especially with bad feeling between them, and after the local council bought the ground, a merger was negotiated and Drolysden returned to the Butcher's Arms ground in 1952, after it had been renovated and the pitch had been rotated to its present position, finally eradicating a long-standing drainage problem.

The record attendance is 4,250 for an FA Cup first round match between Droylsden and Grimsby Town in 1976.

Cemetery Road tram stop

Cemetery Road is a tram stop on the East Manchester Line (EML) of Greater Manchester's light-rail Metrolink system. It opened on 11 February 2013, after a three-day free trial for local residents. The station was constructed as part of Phase 3a of the Metrolink's expansion, and is located in Droylsden at the junction of Manchester Road and Cemetery Road, a part of Tameside, England.

Droylsden F.C.

Droylsden Football Club is a football club in Droylsden, Greater Manchester, England, which plays in the Northern Premier League Division One North, the eighth tier of English football.

Droylsden railway station

Droylsden railway station served the town of Droylsden, Lancashire, England.

Droylsden tram stop

Droylsden is a tram stop on the East Manchester Line (EML) of Greater Manchester's light-rail Metrolink system. It opened on 11 February 2013, after a three-day free trial for local residents. The stop was constructed as part of Phase 3a of the Metrolink's expansion, and is located in Droylsden town centre, a part of Tameside, England.

Fairfield railway station (England)

Fairfield railway station serves the Fairfield area of Droylsden, Tameside, Greater Manchester and is 3.1 miles (5 km) east of Manchester Piccadilly station. It was opened by the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway in 1892, when the branch to Chorlton-cum-Hardy opened, and replaced an earlier station that had opened with the line in 1841. The original station was west of the present station. For a suburban station, Fairfield has very low passenger usage (see figures right).

Before Beeching, this station (then known as Fairfield for Droylsden) was a junction, with a pair of lines from the east breaking off and running to the south, thereby facilitating a route to Longsight, south Manchester and Manchester Central railway station. By means of a switchback to Gorton & Openshaw, this branch enabled the turning round of locomotives without need for a turntable in the area, which could have been invaluable for servicing both the Guide Bridge yards and the facilities of "Gorton Tank" and Beyer, Peacock loco factories. This line was known as the Fallowfield Loop Line and was closed to passengers in July 1958 and to all traffic in 1988.

The station currently has two platforms, but for many years had six, with two island platforms and two side platforms. Two were used for local services, two for express services between Manchester Piccadilly and Sheffield, and two for services for Fallowfied Loop.

The station name was changed from Fairfield for Droylsden to Fairfield on 6 May 1974.

List of schools in Tameside

This is a list of schools in the Metropolitan Borough of Tameside in the English county of Greater Manchester.

Listed buildings in Droylsden

Droylsden is a town in Tameside, Greater Manchester, England. The town, together with its suburb of Littlemoss, contains 37 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, three are listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Originally a rural and farming community, linen bleaching and weaving came to the area in the mid 18th century. Then in 1785, members of the Moravian Church came to the area, and established the community of the Fairfield Moravian Church. Many of the buildings associated with this community are listed, together with farmhouses and farm buildings from the earlier era. The Ashton Canal passes through the area, and a lock, a bridge, and other buildings associated with it are listed. The other listed buildings include a church, a former toll house, and a school.

Saxon Mill, Droylsden

Saxon Mill, Droylsden was a cotton spinning mill in Droylsden, Tameside, Greater Manchester. It was built in the 1907, taken over by the Lancashire Cotton Corporation in the 1930s and passed to Courtaulds in 1964. Production finished in the 1960s, the engine was scrapped in 1967, and the mill demolished in 1995.

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