Dreams to Dream

"Dreams to Dream" is a song from the 1991 animated feature film An American Tail: Fievel Goes West, directed by Phil Nibbelink and Simon Wells, with music by James Horner and lyrics by Will Jennings, based on a short instrumental piece from its predecessor An American Tail (1986). The original version was sung by Cathy Cavadini in her role of Tanya Mousekewitz during the film.

Originally, Celine Dion recorded the song[1] after Linda Ronstadt rejected it. Finally, Ronstadt changed her mind and Spielberg dropped the earlier recording to allow Ronstadt to return in the Fievel saga. A single version of the song was released that year and was performed by Ronstadt, who had previously sung "Somewhere Out There" for An American Tail along with James Ingram. Production on the single version was done by David Foster. Released by MCA Records in late 1991, "Dreams to Dream" climbed to number 13 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart but did not cross over to the Billboard Hot 100. The music video features Ronstadt performing the song intercut with clips from Fievel Goes West. The composition was nominated in 1992 for a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song but lost to Walt Disney Pictures' "Beauty and the Beast" (which Celine Dion ended up doing anyway).

"Dreams to Dream"
Dreams to Dream
Single by Linda Ronstadt
from the album An American Tail: Fievel Goes West
ReleasedNovember 14, 1991
GenrePop
Length4:39
LabelMCA
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)

Personnel

Charts

Chart (1991) Peak
position
US Adult Contemporary (Billboard)[2] 13

References

  1. ^ Franks, Jonathan (2015-06-23). "Celine Dion Shares Heartwarming Tribute To James Horner". Inquisitr. Retrieved 2017-03-01.
  2. ^ "Linda Ronstadt Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017-03-01.
49th Golden Globe Awards

The 49th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1991, were held on January 18, 1992 at the Beverly Hilton. The nominations were announced on December 27, 1991.

An American Tail (franchise)

An American Tail is a franchise based on the 1986 animated film of the same name directed by Don Bluth and produced by Sullivan Bluth Studios/Amblin Entertainment.

The franchise follows the adventures of Fievel Mousekewitz, a Russian-Jewish mouse immigrant to the United States in 1885. The franchise opened up a couple of attractions at Universal Studios Hollywood including "Fievel's Playland" and "An American Tail Show".

Beauty and the Beast (Disney song)

"Beauty and the Beast" is a song written by lyricist Howard Ashman and composer Alan Menken for the Disney animated feature film Beauty and the Beast (1991). The film's theme song, the Broadway-inspired ballad was first recorded by British-American actress Angela Lansbury in her role as the voice of the character Mrs. Potts, and essentially describes the relationship between its two main characters Belle and the Beast, specifically how the couple has learned to accept their differences and in turn change each other for the better. Additionally, the song's lyrics imply that the feeling of love is as timeless and ageless as a "tale as old as time". Lansbury's rendition is heard during the famous ballroom sequence between Belle and the Beast, while a shortened chorale version plays in the closing scenes of the film, and the song's motif features frequently in other pieces of Menken's film score. Lansbury was initially hesitant to record "Beauty and the Beast" because she felt that it was not suitable for her aging singing voice, but ultimately completed the song in one take.

"Beauty and the Beast" was subsequently recorded as a pop duet by Canadian singer Celine Dion and American singer Peabo Bryson, and released as the only single from the film's soundtrack on November 25, 1991. Disney first recruited solely Dion to record a radio-friendly version of it in order to promote the film. However, the studio was concerned that the then-newcomer would not attract a large enough audience in the United States on her own, so they hired the more prominent Bryson to be her duet partner. At first Dion was also hesitant to record "Beauty and the Beast" because she had just recently been fired from recording the theme song of the animated film An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1991). First heard during the film's end credits, the single was produced by Walter Afanasieff who also arranged it with Robbie Buchanan, and included on Dion's self-titled album. The single was accompanied by a music video. Directed by Dominic Orlando, it combined footage of the singers recording the song at The Power Station with excerpts from the film.

Both versions of "Beauty and the Beast" were very successful, garnering both a Golden Globe and Academy Award for Best Original Song, as well as Grammy Awards for Best Song Written for Visual Media and Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. The single was also nominated for the Grammy Award for Record of the Year and the Grammy Award for Song of the Year. Lansbury's performance has been universally lauded by both film and music critics. While the Dion-Bryson version received mixed reviews from critics who felt that it was inferior to Lansbury's original, the single became a commercial success, peaking at number nine on the Billboard Hot 100 and becoming the better-known of the two renditions. In addition to returning Disney songs to the pop charts after a thirty-year absence, the success of "Beauty and the Beast" also launched Dion's career and established her as a bankable recording artist. After "Beauty and the Beast" became the first Disney song to undergo a complete pop transformation, several contemporary artists were inspired to release their own radio-friendly renditions of Disney songs throughout the decade. Considered to be among Disney's best and most popular songs, "Beauty and the Beast" has since been covered by numerous artists. In 2004, the American Film Institute officially recognized "Beauty and the Beast" as one of the greatest songs in film history, ranking it 62nd.

The song is also featured in the 2017 live-action adaptation; sung by Emma Thompson as Mrs. Potts during the film and also as a duet cover version by Ariana Grande and John Legend during the end credits. Grande and Legend's version of the song is an homage to the cover performed by Dion and Bryson for the 1991 film.

Casey at the Bat

"Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888" is a baseball poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. First published in The San Francisco Examiner (then called The Daily Examiner) on June 3, 1888, it was later popularized by DeWolf Hopper in many vaudeville performances. It has become one of the best-known poems in American literature. The poem was originally published anonymously (under the pen name "Phin", based on Thayer's college nickname, "Phinney").

Cathy Cavadini

Catherine Janet Cavadini (born April 21, 1961) is an American actress, voice actress and singer. Most well known as the original voice of Blossom on Cartoon Network's animated television series The Powerpuff Girls and Tanya Mousekewitz in An American Tail: Fievel Goes West and in the subsequent TV series, Fievel's American Tails. In 2003, Catherine was honored with a White House Project Epic Award (which gives recognition to projects that promote women leadership) for her work in The Powerpuff Girls Movie as Blossom.In 1998, Cavadini was nominated for an Annie Award for "Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting by a Female Performer in an Animated Feature Production" for performing the voice and singing for the role of Mary in the animated movie Babes in Toyland. She also sang Dreams to Dream as the character Tanya Mousekewitz in the animated movie An American Tail: Fievel Goes West, which was nominated for Best Song at the 1992 Golden Globe Awards. In addition, she has received 2 Emmy Award Certificates for contributing to Outstanding Sound on the TV series, The X-Files.

Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song

The Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song was awarded for the first time in 1962 and has been awarded annually since 1965 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. The award is presented to the songwriters of a song written specifically for a motion picture. The performers of the song are not credited, unless they also have a writing or co-writing credit.

James Horner

James Roy Horner (August 14, 1953 – June 22, 2015) was an American composer, conductor and orchestrator of film scores, writing over 100. He was known for the integration of choral and electronic elements, and for his frequent use of motifs associated with Celtic music.Horner's first major score was in 1979 for The Lady in Red, but he did not establish himself as an eminent film composer until his work on the 1982 film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. His score for James Cameron's Titanic is the best-selling orchestral film soundtrack of all time. He also wrote the score for the highest-grossing film of all time, Cameron's Avatar.Horner collaborated on multiple projects with directors including Don Bluth, James Cameron, Joe Johnston, Walter Hill and Ron Howard; producers including George Lucas, David Kirschner, Jon Landau, Brian Grazer and Steven Spielberg; and songwriters including Will Jennings, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. He won two Academy Awards, two Golden Globes, three Satellite Awards, and three Saturn Awards, and was nominated for three British Academy Film Awards.

Horner, who was an avid pilot, died at the age of 61 in a single-fatality crash while flying his Short Tucano turboprop aircraft.

Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series home run

Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series home run occurred in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, on October 15, 1988, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Gibson, pinch hitting for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the bottom of the ninth inning, with injuries to both legs, hit a two-run walk-off home run off the Oakland Athletics' Dennis Eckersley that won Game 1 for the Dodgers by a score of 5–4.

After winning the National League West division, the Dodgers were considered the underdogs throughout the 1988 postseason, first to the New York Mets in the NLCS, then to the A's in the World Series. Gibson, who was not expected to play due to injuries in both legs sustained during the NLCS, was surprisingly inserted as a pinch hitter with the Dodgers trailing 4–3 with two outs and the tying run at first base in the bottom of the ninth inning. Gibson's home run—his only plate appearance of the series—helped the Dodgers defeat the A's, 4 games to 1, securing their sixth World Series title.

The play has since become legendary in the baseball world, and is regarded as one of the greatest home runs of all time. It was voted the "greatest moment in L.A. sports history" in a 1995 poll. Many of the images associated with the home run, particularly Gibson pumping his fist while circling the bases, are often shown in classic highlight reels, usually accompanied by Vin Scully or Jack Buck's call. Though not related to his World Series home run, Gibson would be named the 1988 NL MVP. He was named to two All-Star teams (1985 in the AL, and 1988 in the NL), but declined both invitations.

Linda Ronstadt

Linda Maria Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946) is a retired American popular music singer known for singing in a wide range of genres including rock, country, light opera, and Latin. She has earned 11 Grammy Awards, three American Music Awards, two Academy of Country Music awards, an Emmy Award, and an ALMA Award, and many of her albums have been certified gold, platinum or multiplatinum in the United States and internationally. She has also earned nominations for a Tony Award and a Golden Globe award. She was awarded the Latin Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award by The Latin Recording Academy in 2011 and also awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award by The Recording Academy in 2016. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April 2014. On July 28, 2014, she was awarded the National Medal of Arts and Humanities. In 2019, she will receive a joint star with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for their work as the group Trio.In total, she has released over 30 studio albums and 15 compilation or greatest hits albums. Ronstadt charted 38 Billboard Hot 100 singles, with 21 reaching the top 40, 10 in the top 10, three at number 2, and "You're No Good" at number 1. This success did not translate to the UK, with only her single "Blue Bayou" reaching the UK Top 40. Her duet with Aaron Neville, "Don't Know Much", peaked at number 2 in December 1989. In addition, she has charted 36 albums, 10 top-10 albums and three number 1 albums on the Billboard Pop Album Chart. Her autobiography, Simple Dreams: A Musical Memoir, was published in September 2013. It debuted in the Top 10 on The New York Times Best Seller list.

Ronstadt has collaborated with artists in diverse genres, including Bette Midler, Billy Eckstine, Frank Zappa, Rosemary Clooney, Flaco Jiménez, Philip Glass, Warren Zevon, Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons, Dolly Parton, Neil Young, Paul Simon, Johnny Cash, and Nelson Riddle. She has lent her voice to over 120 albums and has sold more than 100 million records, making her one of the world's best-selling artists of all time. Christopher Loudon, of Jazz Times, wrote in 2004 that Ronstadt is "blessed with arguably the most sterling set of pipes of her generation."After completing her last live concert in late 2009, Ronstadt retired in 2011. She was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in December 2012, which left her unable to sing.

Linda Ronstadt discography

The discography of Linda Ronstadt, an American rock, pop and country artist, consists of 28 studio albums, 1 live album, numerous compilation albums, and 63 singles. After recording three albums with her folk rock band, The Stone Poneys, Ronstadt debuted on Capitol Records as a solo artist with 1969's Hand Sown ... Home Grown.Between 1970 and 1973, Ronstadt released three studio albums: two on the Capitol label, Silk Purse (1970) and Linda Ronstadt (1971); and one on the Asylum label, Don't Cry Now (1973). Developing a Country Rock sound similar to that of Eagles, Ronstadt recorded 1974's Grammy-winning Heart Like a Wheel, which sold over two million U. S. copies and spawned the #1 hits "When Will I Be Loved" and "You're No Good". Her next album was 1975's Prisoner in Disguise, which followed a similar musical format and contained a Top Five cover of "Heat Wave". Hasten Down the Wind in 1976 featured two Ronstadt-composed originals and established Ronstadt as the first ever female recording artist to score three million-selling albums. Its biggest hits were a remake of Buddy Holly's "That'll Be The Day" and a reworking of Willie Nelson's "Crazy". The album won Ronstadt her second Grammy Award.

Her 1977 release, Simple Dreams, followed a more Rock-oriented format. It went Triple platinum in America alone and produced two simultaneous Top Five hits: the Platinum-certified "Blue Bayou" and "It's So Easy". Additional hits from the album included "Poor Poor Pitiful Me", "Tumbling Dice", and the Top 10 Country hit "I Never Will Marry".

The following year, Living in the USA included a cover of Chuck Berry's "Back in the U.S.A.". It also contained a soulful Top 10 remake of the Motown classic "Ooh Baby Baby" which crossed over to R&B radio. In addition to the conventional Asylum release that is listed below, special limited-edition releases were also made of this album in red vinyl and picture disc. "Just One Look" was the album's third hit single.

Ronstadt's first disc of the 1980s was the New Wave-styled Mad Love. It debuted at #5 on the Billboard album chart and quickly became her seventh million-selling album in a row. It produced Top 10 singles with "How Do I Make You" and the scorching "Hurt So Bad".

On April 24th, 1980, Ronstadt recorded a concert at Hollywood’s Television Center Studios for HBO, to coincide with the release of Mad Love. 12 hand-picked performances by Ronstadt were later released in her only live album, Live in Hollywood on February 1, 2019.In 1983, Ronstadt changed musical directions towards big band jazz and traditional pop music, recording What's New, which was certified Triple Platinum in the United States. It was succeeded by 1984's Lush Life and 1986's For Sentimental Reasons (both Platinum-certified).

To celebrate her Mexican American heritage, Ronstadt recorded the Spanish-language album Canciones de Mi Padre in 1987, selling more than two million copies in the U. S. and winning Ronstadt another Grammy Award. It stands as the biggest-selling non-English language record in history. The same year, she also teamed with Emmylou Harris and Dolly Parton for the collaboration album Trio, which spawned four Top 10 Country music hits, including the #1 single, "To Know Him Is To Love Him". Her 1989 release, titled Cry Like a Rainstorm, Howl Like the Wind, was Ronstadt's first pop music album in seven years. It produced two Grammy Award-winning duets with Aaron Neville on the Billboard Hot 100: the Gold-certified number 2 hit "Don't Know Much" and the number 11 hit "All My Life". Both songs were long-running #1 Adult Contemporary hits.

After releasing two less successful Spanish albums in the early 1990s, Ronstadt returned to something more contemporary with 1993's New Age-styled Winter Light. It was followed by her 1995 return to Country Rock: Feels Like Home. Her Grammy-winning album of children's lullabies was issued in 1996 and had strong sales. Her 1998 release, We Ran, featured more Rock-oriented album material. In 1999, Ronstadt reunited with Harris and Parton for Trio II, which won Ronstadt her eleventh competitive Grammy Award and nineteenth Gold album. That year she also recorded a Southwestern-inspired release with Harris, Western Wall: The Tucson Sessions.

Her 2004 release, Hummin' to Myself, was Ronstadt's fourth album of traditional jazz standards . In 2006, she made what turned out to be her final studio album – Adieu False Heart – mixing Cajun music with rock in a collaboration with Ann Savoy. Ronstadt has sold over 30 million records in the United States according to the Recording Industry Association of America.

Simon Franglen

Simon Franglen (born 1963, Westminster, London, England) is an English composer, record producer, arranger and musician. His credits include four of the list of top grossing films and six of the list of best-selling albums of all time.

He is best known for his work on Avatar, for which he received Golden Globe and Grammy nominations for the theme song, and for being the producer of "My Heart Will Go On" from Titanic, for which he won a Record of The Year Grammy Award. Other film credits range from David Fincher's Se7en, for which he created the synthesizer programming, to arranging the music for the James Bond films Skyfall and Spectre.

Will Jennings

Wilbur H. Jennings (usually Will; born June 27, 1944) is an American songwriter, who is popularly known for writing the lyrics for "My Heart Will Go On", the theme for the film Titanic. He has been inducted into the Songwriter's Hall of Fame and has won several awards including three Grammy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, and two Academy Awards.

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