DreamWorks

DreamWorks Pictures (also known as DreamWorks SKG or DreamWorks Studios, commonly referred to as DreamWorks) is an American film production label of Amblin Partners. It was founded in 1994 as a film studio by Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen (together, SKG), of which they owned 72%. The studio was formerly distributing its own and third-party films by itself. It has produced or distributed more than ten films with box-office grosses of more than $100 million each.

In December 2005, the founders agreed to sell the studio to Viacom, parent of Paramount Pictures. The sale was completed in February 2006 (this version is now named DW Studios). In 2008, DreamWorks announced its intention to end its partnership with Paramount and signed a $1.5 billion deal to produce films with India's Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group,[2] re-creating DreamWorks Pictures into an independent entity. The following year, DreamWorks entered into a distribution agreement with Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, wherein Disney would distribute DreamWorks films through Touchstone Pictures; the deal continued until 2016. As of October 2016, DreamWorks' films are marketed and distributed by Universal Pictures. Currently, DreamWorks operates out of offices at Universal Studios.

DreamWorks' former feature animation unit, now known as DreamWorks Animation (which currently owns the DreamWorks trademarks), was spun off in 2004, and as of August 2016 is a subsidiary of NBCUniversal.[3] Spielberg's company continues to use the DreamWorks trademarks under license from Universal Studios.[4][5]

DreamWorks Pictures
Label
IndustryEntertainment
FoundedOctober 12, 1994
FoundersSteven Spielberg
Jeffrey Katzenberg
David Geffen
Headquarters
Area served
Worldwide
ProductsTheatrical films
Number of employees
80 (2012)[1]
ParentAmblin Partners
Websitedreamworkspictures.com

History

DreamWorks SKG: original founding

The original company was founded following Katzenberg's resignation from the Walt Disney Company in 1994. Jeffrey Katzenberg approached Steven Spielberg and David Geffen about forming a live-action and animation film studio, which had not been done in decades due to the risk and expense. They agreed on three conditions: They would make fewer than nine movies a year, they would be free to work for other studios if they chose, and they would go home in time for dinner. They officially founded DreamWorks SKG in October 1994, with financial backing of $33 million from each of the three partners and $500 million from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.[6]

Their new studio was based at offices in the Universal Studios lot, previously occupied by Amblin Entertainment. Despite access to sound stages and sets, DreamWorks preferred to film motion pictures on location. Usually, the company would film in a soundstage or set in a major studio. As of 2016, DreamWorks is still based in Universal.

In December 1994, DreamWorks Television was formed after DreamWorks agreed to a $200 million seven-year TV production joint venture with the Capital Cities/ABC.[7] The company was set up to produce series for broadcast network, cable channels and first run syndication with no first look for the ABC network, but financial incentives favored ABC.[8] The first show, Champs, was scheduled as a mid-season replacement for ABC. Dan McDermott was named division chief executive in June 1995.[9] DWTV's first success was Spin City on ABC.[8] The Walt Disney Company bought Capital Cities/ABC in February 1996.[10] In 2002, the DreamWorks joint venture agreement with ABC ended. That agreement was replaced by a development agreement with NBC with a first look clause.[8] In 2013, DreamWorks Television merged with Amblin Television.

In 1995, traditional animation artists from Amblimation joined the new studio, which led to DreamWorks buying part of Pacific Data Images, a company specializing in visual effects, and renaming PDI/DreamWorks. Both were software divisions, and would merge later on. For then, DreamWorks had the traditional animators working for their animation department, and the computer animators worked on CG films. Amblimation would be shut down in 1997, leading the staff to join DreamWorks Animation. The same year, DreamWorks Interactive, a computer and video game developer and joint venture between DreamWorks and Microsoft, was founded. On February 24, 2000, Electronic Arts announced the acquisition of DreamWorks Interactive and merged it with EA Pacific and Westwood Studios to form EA Los Angeles, now DICE Los Angeles.

In 1996, the company's record label, DreamWorks Records, was founded, the first project of which was George Michael's album Older. The first band signed to the label was eels, who released their debut album Beautiful Freak (1997). The record company never lived up to expectations, though, and was sold in October 2003 to Universal Music Group, which operated the label as DreamWorks Nashville. That label was shut down in 2005 when its flagship artist, Toby Keith, departed to form his own label.[11]

In 1997, DreamWorks Pictures released its first three feature films, The Peacemaker, a film about terrorism; Amistad, Spielberg's first film for the studio about an African slave rebellion and the aftermath of the massacre; and MouseHunt, the studio's first family film about two brothers trying to fight a mischievous mouse.

In 1998, the United States 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lawsuit against DreamWorks for trademark infringement by Dreamwerks Production Group, Inc.,[12] a company mostly specializing in Star Trek conventions.[13] The same year, PDI/DreamWorks produced its first full-length animated features, Antz and The Prince of Egypt, which were distributed by DreamWorks Pictures. DreamWorks Pictures continued to distribute PDI/DreamWorks productions through their distribution name until 2004.

In 2000, DreamWorks was planning in building a studio backlot after buying 1,087 acres of land in the Playa Vista area in Los Angeles. It was to be complete with 18 sound stages, with many office buildings and a lake. There would also be new homes, schools, churches, and museums. The project was to be completed in 2001, but was cancelled for financial reasons.[14] Starting in 1999, DreamWorks won three consecutive Academy Awards for Best Picture for American Beauty, Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind (the latter two were co-productions with Universal Pictures). The same year, Go Fish Pictures, a division of DreamWorks that produced and distributed arthouse, independent and foreign films, was founded. The division experienced success with the anime films Millennium Actress (2003) and Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence (2004), respectively, which led them to venture into releasing live-action films, with the release of The Chumscrubber. However, The Chumscrubber was a commercial and critical failure, which led DreamWorks to shut down the division in 2007 shortly after the release of Japanese film Casshern.

For the period beginning October 1, 2004 to January 31, 2006, DreamWorks films were distributed in the domestic theatrical and worldwide television market by DreamWorks Pictures and in international theatrical and worldwide home entertainment markets by Universal Pictures.[15] In 2004, DreamWorks Animation was spun off into a separate public company.

David Geffen admitted that DreamWorks had come close to bankruptcy twice. Under Katzenberg's watch, the studio suffered a $125 million loss on Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas,[16] and also overestimated the DVD demand for Shrek 2.[17] In 2005, out of their two large budget pictures, War of the Worlds was produced as a joint effort with Paramount Pictures which was the first to reap a significant amount of profits, while The Island bombed at the domestic box office but turned a profit internationally through Warner Bros..[16]

Paramount ownership

In December 2005, the original Viacom, the then-parent of Paramount Pictures, agreed to purchase the live-action studio, still keeping the original name and producing/distribution name. The deal was valued at approximately $1.6 billion, an amount that included about $400 million in debt assumptions.[18] The acquisition of the live-action DreamWorks studio was completed by the current Viacom, which had recently split from the original at the end of 2005, on February 1, 2006.[19]

On March 17, 2006, Viacom agreed to sell a controlling interest in the DreamWorks Pictures live-action library to Soros Strategic Partners and Dune Entertainment II.[20] The film library was valued at $900 million. Paramount Pictures retained the worldwide distribution rights to those films, as well as various ancillary rights, including music publishing (the music publishing rights were later licensed to Sony/ATV Music Publishing when the company acquired Viacom's Famous Music subdivision), sequels and merchandising. The sale was completed on May 8, 2006.[21] On February 8, 2010, Viacom repurchased Soros' controlling stake in the DreamWorks Pictures library for around $400 million.[22]

Reliance-Spielberg joint venture

In June 2008, Variety reported that DreamWorks was looking for financing that would allow it to continue operations, but as an independent production company, once its deal with Paramount ended later that year.[23] Several public equity funds were approached for financing, including Blackstone Group, Fuse Global, TPG Capital and several others, but all passed on the deal given their understanding of the Hollywood markets. In September 2008, Variety reported that DreamWorks closed a deal with Indian investment firm Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group to create a stand-alone production company and end its ties with Paramount.[24][25] In January 2009, Spielberg entered a licensing agreement with DreamWorks Animation to use the DreamWorks trademarks, logo, and name for film productions and releases.[26] The Viacom-owned DreamWorks was then renamed DW Studios.

On February 9, 2009, DreamWorks Pictures entered into a long-term, 30-picture distribution deal with Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, by which DreamWorks' films would be released through the Touchstone Pictures banner.[27] The deal also included cofunding via a loan by Walt Disney Studios to DreamWorks for production and access to slots in Disney's pay television agreement, then with Starz.[27] The agreement was reported to have come after negotiations broke off with Universal Pictures just days earlier.[28] DreamWorks raised $325 million from Reliance Entertainment and an additional $325 million in debt in 2009.[1]

DreamWorks' slate of films in 2011, I Am Number Four, Cowboys & Aliens, and Fright Night failed, while The Help, Real Steel and Spielberg's War Horse had success at the box office. This left DreamWorks so financially drained that by 2011, the company was seeking additional funding from Reliance. Reliance gave a $200 million investment in April 2012. Under the deal, DreamWorks Pictures scaled back production to three films per year and sought co-financiers on big budget films, such as 20th Century Fox, who co-financed Lincoln and Bridge of Spies. The company continued to utilize Disney's marketing unit.[1] In August that year, after renegotiating their agreement with Disney, DreamWorks formed a deal with Mister Smith Entertainment to distribute its films in EMEA, while Disney would continue to distribute in North America, Latin America, Australia, Russia, and some territories in Asia.[29]

Amblin Partners venture

In September 2015, it was reported that DreamWorks and Disney would not renew their distribution deal, set to expire in August 2016,[30][31] with The Light Between Oceans being released in September as the final DreamWorks film distributed by Disney under their original distribution agreement.[32] During that time, DreamWorks was in early negotiations with Universal Pictures to distribute its upcoming films.[30][31] The contract allowing Spielberg to license the DreamWorks name and logo from Jeffrey Katzenberg's DreamWorks Animation was set to expire on January 1, 2016, leading to media speculation that Spielberg would not renew the pact.[33]

On December 16, 2015, Spielberg, Reliance, Entertainment One and Participant Media partnered to launch the content production company Amblin Partners,[34] relegating DreamWorks to a brand for adult-themed films produced under the new company.[34][35] In addition to DreamWorks, the new company also would produce films under the Amblin Entertainment and Participant banners.

On the same day, Amblin Partners announced a five-year distribution deal with Universal, under which the company's films would be distributed and marketed by either the main Universal label or its specialty label, Focus Features.[36][37] The Girl on the Train was the first film released under the new agreement.[38]

On February 15, 2017, Universal acquired a minority stake in Amblin Partners, strengthening the relationship between Universal and Amblin,[39] and reuniting a minority percentage of the DreamWorks Pictures label with DreamWorks Animation.

The DreamWorks logo features a boy sitting on a crescent moon while fishing. The general idea for the logo was the idea of company co-founder Steven Spielberg, who wanted a computer-generated image. Illustrator Robert Hunt was commissioned to execute the idea as a painting, and he used his son as the model.[40] The logo was then turned into a motion graphic at Industrial Light & Magic, in collaboration with Kaleidoscope Films, Dave Carson and Clint Goldman.[41] It was animated by ILM animation supervisor Wes Takahashi.[42][43] Music accompanying the logo to start live-action DreamWorks movies was specially composed by John Williams; the DreamWorks Animation logo has music from the Harry Gregson-Williams/John Powell score for the film Shrek (2001).

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Fritz, Ben (April 10, 2012). "DreamWorks Studios stays alive with new $200-million infusion". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 6, 2013.
  2. ^ AFP: DreamWorks, India's Reliance Sign Major Deal, AFP, September 21, 2008
  3. ^ "Comcast's NBCUniversal completes purchase of DreamWorks Animation". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  4. ^ ex99-1. Sec.gov. Retrieved on 2013-08-24.
  5. ^ Dreamworks Animation – Current Report. Investor.shareholder.com (2011-12-07). Retrieved on 2013-08-24.
  6. ^ Svetkey, Benjamin (28 October 1994). "Jeffrey Katzenberg, David Geffen, and Steven Spielberg Start a Studio". EW.com. Retrieved 14 August 2018.
  7. ^ McClellan, Steve. (December 5, 1994). "ABC makes high-profile production leap." Broadcasting & Cable. 1994. HighBeam Research. Accessed on December 27, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c Kunz, William M. (2007). "2". Culture Conglomerates: Consolidation in the Motion Picture and Television Industries. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 49, 50. ISBN 978-0-7425-4066-8. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  9. ^ Hofmeister, Sallie (June 20, 1995). "Company Town : Fox Executive Dan McDermott Named to Head DreamWorks SKG Television". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  10. ^ Fabrikant, Geraldine. THE MEDIA BUSINESS;Disney and ABC Shareholders Solidly Approve Merger Deal January 05, 1996. The New York Times. Accessed July 8, 2013.
  11. ^ Stark, Phyllis, "Toby Keith topped country charts, shook up Music Row," Billboard magazine, December 24, 2005, p. YE-18.
  12. ^ "DREAMWERKS PRODUCTION GROUP INC v. SKG STUDIO SKG". Retrieved February 25, 2013.
  13. ^ "Open Jurist". 142 F. 3d 1127 – Dreamwerks Production Group Inc v. Skg Studio Skg. Retrieved September 15, 2011.
  14. ^ "Dreamworks". seeing-stars.com.
  15. ^ "DREAMWORKS ANIMATION SKG, INC. - FORM 10-K (Annual Report)" (PDF). Shareholder.com. DreamWorks Animation SKG. February 25, 2011. p. 148.
  16. ^ a b Roger Friedman. "'Island' Could Sink DreamWorks Sale". Fox News.
  17. ^ DVD: doom, gloom or boom?, CNN
  18. ^ Peter Pae; Claudia Eller (October 6, 2008). "DreamWorks and Paramount settle divorce". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 29, 2014.
  19. ^ "Paramount, DreamWorks agree to deal – Dec. 12, 2005". cnn.com. Archived from the original on December 15, 2005.
  20. ^ "Viacom to Sell DreamWorks Film Library". AP. March 18, 2006 – via The New York Times.
  21. ^ Viacom to Sell DreamWorks Film Library. Associated Press. March 18, 2006. Retrieved on July 20, 2009.
  22. ^ Fixmer, Andy (February 11, 2010). "Viacom Acquires Soros Stake in Films for $400 Million (Update3)". Bloomberg. Retrieved February 7, 2013.
  23. ^ Anne Thompson. "DreamWorks considers indie future". Variety.
  24. ^ Tatiana Siegel, Anne Thompson. "Reliance, DreamWorks close deal". Variety.
  25. ^ "DreamWorks completes deal with Reliance ADA". Reuters. September 22, 2008. Retrieved September 25, 2012.
  26. ^ McClintock, Pamela (September 24, 2015). "Will Steven Spielberg Drop the DreamWorks Name?". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  27. ^ a b Eller, Claudia (February 10, 2009). "DreamWorks gets Disney cash in distribution deal". Los Angeles Times.
  28. ^ Graser, Marc; Tatiana Siegel (February 9, 2009). "Disney signs deal with DreamWorks". Variety.com. Retrieved February 6, 2013.
  29. ^ Fritz, Ben (August 29, 2012). "DreamWorks replaces Disney with new international partner". Los Angeles Times.
  30. ^ a b Masters, Kim (September 2, 2015). "Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks to Split From Disney, in Talks With Universal (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  31. ^ a b McNary, Dave (September 2, 2015). "Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks to Leave Disney, Possibly for Universal". Variety. Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  32. ^ "DreamWorks Studios, Participant Media, Reliance Entertainment and Entertainment One Form Amblin Partners, a New Film, Television and Digital Content Creation Company" (Press release). Business Wire. Universal City, California. December 16, 2015. Retrieved December 23, 2015. Film projects in various stages of production include: “The BFG” and “The Light Between Oceans,” scheduled for release by Disney in 2016.
  33. ^ McClintock, Pamela (September 24, 2015). "Will Steven Spielberg Drop the DreamWorks Name?". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  34. ^ a b "Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks Relaunches as Amblin Partners". The Wall Street Journal. December 16, 2015. Retrieved December 16, 2015.
  35. ^ Cieply, Michael (December 16, 2015). "Steven Spielberg and DreamWorks Studios in Deal to Form New Company". The New York Times. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  36. ^ Lang, Brent (December 16, 2015). "Steven Spielberg, Jeff Skoll Bring Amblin Partners to Universal". Variety. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  37. ^ Busch, Anita (December 16, 2015). "It's Official: Spielberg, DreamWorks, Participant, eOne, Others Pact For Amblin Partners". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  38. ^ Pamela McClintock; Gregg Kilday (December 16, 2015). "Steven Spielberg, Jeff Skoll Team to Form Amblin Partners, Strike Distribution Deal With Universal". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 22, 2015.
  39. ^ Perry, Spencer (February 15, 2017). "Universal Studios Buys a Minority Stake in Amblin Partners". Comingsoon.net. Retrieved February 20, 2017.
  40. ^ Wook Kim (September 24, 2015). "Time Magazine 10 Movie Studio Logos and the Stories Behind Them". Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  41. ^ "The Stories Behind Hollywood Studio Logos". Neatorama. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  42. ^ "Subject: Wes Ford Takahashi". Animators' Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 14, 2016.
  43. ^ "Digital Arts Faculty". International Technological University. Retrieved June 17, 2016.

External links

Coordinates: 34°09′26″N 118°17′06″W / 34.157326°N 118.285096°W

Amblin Partners

Amblin Partners (legally known as Storyteller Holding Co., LLC and Storyteller Distribution Co., LLC) is an American content creation and entertainment company which produces and develops films and television programming. Amblin is a restructured DreamWorks Studios.

Antz

Antz is a 1998 American computer-animated adventure comedy film directed by Eric Darnell and Tim Johnson and written by Paul Weitz, Chris Weitz, and Todd Alcott. The film stars Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Jennifer Lopez, Sylvester Stallone, Christopher Walken, Dan Aykroyd, Anne Bancroft, Danny Glover and Gene Hackman. Some of the main characters share facial similarities with the actors who voice them. Antz is DreamWorks Pictures' first animated film, and the third feature-length computer-animated film after Disney/Pixar's Toy Story, and NDR Filmes' Cassiopeia.

The film's production resulted in a controversial public feud between DreamWorks co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg, Steve Jobs, and John Lasseter of Pixar, concerning the parallel productions of this film and Pixar's A Bug's Life. This only worsened when Disney refused to avoid competition with DreamWorks' intended first animated release, The Prince of Egypt (1998).

Antz premiered on September 19, 1998, at the Toronto International Film Festival, and was released theatrically in the United States on October 2, 1998. It grossed $171.8 million worldwide on a budget of $42–60 million. Rotten Tomatoes's consensus was that critics praised the voice cast, animation, humor and its appeal towards adults.

DICE Los Angeles

DICE Los Angeles (formerly DreamWorks Interactive L.L.C., EA Los Angeles and Danger Close Games) is an American video game developer and a division of EA DICE. The company was founded in March 1995 as joint venture between DreamWorks and Microsoft under the name DreamWorks Interactive. It was acquired by Electronic Arts and renamed EA Los Angeles in 2000, and to Danger Close Games in 2010. In 2013, the studio became a division of EA DICE and received the name DICE Los Angeles. The company is primarily known for having developed the Medal of Honor and Command & Conquer series of video games.

DreamWorks Animation

DreamWorks Animation LLC (also known as DreamWorks Animation SKG or simply DreamWorks, formerly trading as DreamWorks Animation SKG, Inc. from 2004–2016) is an American animation studio that is a subsidiary of Universal Pictures, a division of Comcast through its wholly owned subsidiary NBCUniversal. It is based in Glendale, California and produces animated feature films, television programs and online virtual games. The studio has currently released a total of 35 feature films, including the franchises Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon, The Croods, Trolls and The Boss Baby. Originally formed under the banner of its main DreamWorks studio in 1997 by some of Amblin Entertainment's former animation branch Amblimation alumni, it was spun off into a separate public company in 2004. DreamWorks Animation currently maintains its Glendale campus, as well as satellite studios in India and China. On August 22, 2016, NBCUniversal acquired DreamWorks Animation for $3.8 billion, making it a division of the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group as an acquisition for the animation studio.

As of October 2017, its feature films have grossed $14.457 billion worldwide, with a $417.8 million average gross per film. Shrek 2 (2004) is among the 50 highest-grossing films of all time, being the fiftieth, and fourteen of the other films produced by the studio are also among the 50 highest-grossing animated films. Although the studio also made traditionally animated films in the past, as well as stop-motion co-production with Aardman Animations, all of their films now use computer animation. The studio has earned three Academy Awards, as well as 41 Emmy Awards and numerous Annie Awards, and multiple Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations. In recent years, the animation studio has acquired and created new divisions in an effort to diversify beyond the high-risk movie business.

Films produced by DreamWorks Animation were formerly distributed worldwide by its main DreamWorks studio, DreamWorks Pictures, from 1998 to 2005, Paramount Pictures from 2006 to 2012, and 20th Century Fox from 2013 to 2017. Universal Pictures will distribute subsequent DreamWorks Animation films, starting on February 22, 2019 with the release of How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World. Universal also now owns the rights to DreamWorks' back catalogue.

DreamWorks Classics

DreamWorks Classics (formerly Classic Media) is an American entertainment company owned by DreamWorks Animation. It was founded as Classic Media in 2000 by Eric Ellenbogen and John Engelman. The studio's library consists of acquired intellectual property catalogs and character brands as well as the licensing rights for various third-party properties. In 2012, DreamWorks Animation acquired Classic Media from its then-owner, Boomerang Media.

DreamWorks Dragons

DreamWorks Dragons is an American computer-animated television series based on the 2010 film How to Train Your Dragon. The series serves as a bridge between the first film and its 2014 sequel.Jay Baruchel, America Ferrera, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, T.J. Miller, and David Tennant reprise their voice-acting roles from How to Train Your Dragon. New cast members include Julie Marcus and Andree Vermeulen as Ruffnut (previously voiced by Kristen Wiig), Zack Pearlman as Snotlout (previously voiced by Jonah Hill), Chris Edgerly as Gobber the Belch (previously voiced by Craig Ferguson), and Nolan North as Stoick the Vast (previously voiced by Gerard Butler).

DreamWorks Dragons was announced by Cartoon Network on October 12, 2010. According to Tim Johnson, executive producer for How to Train Your Dragon, the series was planned to be much darker and deeper than DreamWorks Animation's previous television series spin-offs, with a similar tone to the movie. DreamWorks Dragons was the first DreamWorks Animation series to air on Cartoon Network rather than Nickelodeon.A one-hour preview consisting of two episodes aired on August 7, 2012, on Cartoon Network, with the official premiere of the series on September 5, 2012. A total of 40 episodes aired on Cartoon Network during the first two seasons, subtitled Riders of Berk and Defenders of Berk respectively. Afterwards, the series was named Race to the Edge, the first season of which debuted on Netflix on June 26, 2015. The second and third seasons of Dragons: Race to the Edge premiered on January 8 and June 24, 2016, respectively. The fourth season was released on February 17, 2017. The series was renewed for a fifth season, which was released on Netflix on August 25, 2017. The series (alongside the Netflix exclusive, All Hail King Julien) is syndicated as part of the newly rebranded Universal Kids on September 9, 2017. Dragons: Race to the Edge was renewed for a sixth and final season which was released on February 16, 2018.

DreamWorks Records

DreamWorks Records (often referred in copyright notices as SKG Music, LLC) was an American record label founded in 1996 by David Geffen, Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg as a subsidiary of DreamWorks SKG. The label operated until 2003 when it was sold to Universal Music Group. The label itself also featured a Nashville, Tennessee-based subsidiary, DreamWorks Nashville, which specialized in country music and was shut down in 2005. The company's logo was designed by Roy Lichtenstein and was his last commission before his death in 1997.

How to Train Your Dragon (franchise)

The How to Train Your Dragon franchise from DreamWorks Animation consists of three feature films How to Train Your Dragon (2010), How to Train Your Dragon 2 (2014) and How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (2019). The franchise is loosely based on the book series of the same name by British author Cressida Cowell. The franchise also consists of four short films: Legend of the Boneknapper Dragon (2011), Book of Dragons (2012), Gift of the Night Fury (2012) and Dawn of the Dragon Racers (2014). A television series following the events of the first film, Dragons: Riders of Berk, began airing on Cartoon Network in September 2012. It was renamed Dragons: Defenders of Berk for second season. Another television series, titled Dragons: Race to the Edge, serves as a prequel to the second film and aired on Netflix from June 2015 to February 2018.The franchise follows the adventures of a young Viking named Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, son of Stoick the Vast, leader of the Viking island of Berk. Although initially dismissed as a clumsy and underweight misfit, he soon becomes renowned as a courageous expert in dragons, beginning with Toothless, a member of the rare Night Fury breed as his flying mount and his closest companion. Together with his friends, he manages the village's allied dragon population in defense of his home as leader of a flying corps of dragon riders. Dean DeBlois, the director of the trilogy, described its story as "Hiccup's coming of age," taking a span of five years between the first and second film, while explaining in the third and final film why dragons no longer exist.The film series has been highly acclaimed with its first two features being nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, in addition to the first film's nomination for the Academy Award for Best Original Score.

Kung Fu Panda

Kung Fu Panda is a 2008 American computer-animated action comedy martial arts film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures.1 It was directed by John Stevenson and Mark Osborne and produced by Melissa Cobb, and stars the voices of Jack Black, Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Ian McShane, Seth Rogen, Lucy Liu, David Cross, Randall Duk Kim, James Hong, Dan Fogler, Michael Clarke Duncan, and Jackie Chan. The film is set in a version of ancient China populated by anthropomorphic talking animals and revolves around a bumbling panda named Po, a kung fu enthusiast. When an evil kung fu warrior named Tai Lung is foretold to escape from prison, Po is unwittingly named the "Dragon Warrior", destined to defeat him.The film was conceived by Michael Lachance, a DreamWorks Animation executive. It was originally intended to be a parody, but director Stevenson decided instead to shoot an action comedy wuxia film that incorporates the hero's journey narrative archetype for the lead character. The computer animation in the film was more complex than anything DreamWorks had done before. As with most DreamWorks animated films, Hans Zimmer (this time collaborating with John Powell) scored Kung Fu Panda. He visited China to absorb the culture and get to know the China National Symphony Orchestra as part of his preparation.

Kung Fu Panda premiered in the United States on June 6, 2008. The film received positive reviews upon release. Kung Fu Panda opened in 4,114 theaters, grossing $20.3 million on its opening day and $60.2 million on its opening weekend, resulting in the number one position at the box office. The film became DreamWorks' biggest opening for a non-sequel film, the highest grossing animated film of the year worldwide, and also had the fourth-largest opening weekend for a DreamWorks animated film at the American and Canadian box office, behind Shrek 2, Shrek the Third, and Shrek Forever After. A sequel, Kung Fu Panda 2, was released on May 26, 2011, along with a television series Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness premiering on Nickelodeon later that same year as a part of a franchise. A second sequel called Kung Fu Panda 3 was released on January 29, 2016.

Madagascar (2005 film)

Madagascar is a 2005 American computer-animated adventure comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by DreamWorks Pictures. It was directed by Eric Darnell and Tom McGrath from a screenplay by Mark Burton, Billy Frolick, Darnell, and McGrath, and features the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, David Schwimmer, and Jada Pinkett Smith, with Sacha Baron Cohen, Cedric the Entertainer, and Andy Richter voicing secondary characters. The film's plot revolves on four animals from the Central Park Zoo who unexpectedly find themselves stranded on the island of Madagascar, and must learn to adapt to the wild.

Madagascar was released to theaters on May 27, 2005. Despite its mixed critical reception, it was a success at the box office. The film launched a franchise with a series of films, including the sequel Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa in 2008 and another film Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted in 2012. A spin-off featuring the series' penguin characters, Penguins of Madagascar, was released on November 26, 2014.

Rise of the Guardians

Rise of the Guardians is a 2012 American 3D computer-animated action fantasy film based on William Joyce's The Guardians of Childhood book series and The Man in the Moon short film by Joyce and Reel FX Creative Studios. Peter Ramsey directed the film, while Joyce and Guillermo del Toro were executive producers with voice acting by Chris Pine, Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Isla Fisher, and Jude Law. Produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures,1 it was released on November 21, 2012.

Set about 300 years after the book series, the film tells a story about Guardians Santa Claus, the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, and the Sandman, who enlist Jack Frost to stop Pitch Black from engulfing the world in darkness. The film was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature Film. This was the last DreamWorks Animation film to be distributed by Paramount Pictures.

Shark Tale

Shark Tale is a 2004 American computer-animated comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and directed by Vicky Jenson, Bibo Bergeron and Rob Letterman. The first computer-animated film by DreamWorks Animation to be produced at the Glendale studio, the film stars Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Angelina Jolie, Jack Black, and Martin Scorsese. Other voices were provided by Ziggy Marley, Doug E. Doug, Michael Imperioli, Vincent Pastore and Peter Falk. It tells the story of a fish named Oscar (Smith) who falsely claims to have killed the son of a shark mob boss (De Niro) to advance his own community standing.

Shark Tale opened at #1 with $47.6 million, which was the second-highest opening for a DreamWorks Animation film at the time, behind Shrek 2 ($108 million). It remained as the #1 film in the U.S. and Canada for its second and third weekends, and made $367 million worldwide against its $75 million budget. It was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

The Croods

The Croods is a 2013 American 3D computer-animated comedy adventure film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by 20th Century Fox. It stars the voices of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, Clark Duke, and Cloris Leachman. The film is set in a fictional prehistoric Pliocene era known as "The Croodaceous" (a prehistoric period which contains fictional prehistoric creatures) when a caveman's position as a "Leader of the Hunt" is threatened by the arrival of a prehistoric genius who comes up with revolutionary new inventions as they trek through a dangerous but exotic land in search of a new home.

The Croods was written and directed by Kirk DeMicco and Chris Sanders, and produced by Kristine Belson and Jane Hartwell. The film premiered at the 63rd Berlin International Film Festival on February 15, 2013, and was released in the United States on March 22, 2013. As part of the distribution deal, this was the first DreamWorks Animation film to be distributed by 20th Century Fox, since the end of their distribution deal with Paramount Pictures.The Croods received generally positive reviews, and proved to be a box office success, earning more than $587 million on a budget of $135 million. It was nominated for Academy Award for Best Animated Feature and for Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature Film. The film launched a new franchise, with a television series, Dawn of the Croods, which debuted on December 24, 2015, on Netflix. A sequel was announced for a 2017 release, but was later cancelled. However, it was put back into production in 2017 with a release date scheduled for September 18, 2020.

The Prince of Egypt

The Prince of Egypt is a 1998 American epic animated musical drama film and the first traditional animated film produced and released by DreamWorks. The film is an adaptation of the Book of Exodus and follows the life of Moses from being a prince of Egypt to his ultimate destiny to lead the children of Israel out of Egypt. Directed by Brenda Chapman, Steve Hickner, and Simon Wells, the film features songs written by Stephen Schwartz and a score composed by Hans Zimmer. The voice cast consists of Val Kilmer in a dual role, Ralph Fiennes, Michelle Pfeiffer, Sandra Bullock, Jeff Goldblum, Danny Glover, Patrick Stewart, Helen Mirren, Steve Martin, and Martin Short.

Jeffrey Katzenberg had frequently suggested an animated adaptation of the 1956 film The Ten Commandments while working for The Walt Disney Company, and he decided to put the idea into production after founding DreamWorks in 1995. To make this inaugural project, DreamWorks employed artists who had worked for Walt Disney Feature Animation and the recently disbanded Amblimation, totaling a crew of 350 people from 34 different nations. The film has a blend of traditional animation and computer-generated imagery, created using software from Toon Boom Animation and Silicon Graphics.

Theatrically released on December 18, 1998, and on home video on September 14, 1999, reviews were generally positive, with critics praising the animation, music, and voice work. The film went on to gross over $218 million worldwide in theaters, which made it the most successful non-Disney animated feature at the time. The film's success led to the direct-to-video prequel Joseph: King of Dreams (2000) and the development of a stage adaptation. The song "When You Believe" became a commercially successful single in a pop version performed by Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey, and went on to win Best Original Song at the 1999 Academy Awards.

Trolls (film)

Trolls is a 2016 American computer-animated buddy romantic musical comedy film based on the Troll dolls created by Thomas Dam. The film was directed by Mike Mitchell and co-directed by Walt Dohrn, written by Jonathan Aibel and Glenn Berger and based on a story by Erica Rivinoja. The film features the voices of Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Zooey Deschanel, Russell Brand, James Corden and Gwen Stefani. The film follows two trolls who go on a quest, to save their village from destruction by the Bergens, creatures who eat Trolls to be happy.

The 33rd animated feature film produced by DreamWorks Animation, the film premiered on October 8, 2016, at the BFI London Film Festival and was theatrically released in the United States on November 4, 2016, by 20th Century Fox. The film grossed $346 million worldwide against its $125 million budget and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song for "Can't Stop the Feeling!". A sequel, Trolls World Tour, is scheduled to be released on April 17, 2020.

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures (also known as Universal Studios, formerly Universal Film Manufacturing Company) is an American film studio owned by Comcast through the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group division of its wholly owned subsidiary NBCUniversal. Founded in 1912 by Carl Laemmle, Mark Dintenfass, Charles O. Baumann, Adam Kessel, Pat Powers, William Swanson, David Horsley, Robert H. Cochrane, and Jules Brulatour, it is the oldest surviving film studio in the United States, the world's fifth oldest after Gaumont, Pathé, Titanus, and Nordisk Film, and the oldest member of Hollywood's "Big Six" studios in terms of the overall film market. Its studios are located in Universal City, California, and its corporate offices are located in New York City.

Universal Pictures is a member of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and was one of the "Little Three" majors during Hollywood's golden age.

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