Drakula İstanbul'da

Drakula İstanbul'da (Dracula in Istanbul) is a Turkish 1953 film version of Bram Stoker's original novel Dracula.

The screenplay was based on a 1928 novel by Ali Riza Seyfi called Kazıklı Voyvoda (Impaler Voivode), and is more or less a translation of Stoker's novel, but there is no Renfield character and Güzin, the "Mina Harker" character, is a showgirl given to performing in revealing outfits. Drakula/Dracula is played by balding Atif Kaptan. Both the novel and the film make an explicit connection with the historical Vlad the Impaler, the Prince and three-time Voivode of Wallachia. This is the first film to portray Dracula with fangs.

Drakula Istanbulda
Dracula in İstanbul

See also

References

Drakula İstanbul'da on IMDb

Brides of Dracula

The Brides of Dracula are characters in Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula. They are three seductive female vampire "sisters" who reside with Count Dracula in his castle in Transylvania, where they entrance men with their beauty and charm, and then proceed to feed upon them. Dracula provides them with victims to devour, mainly infants and children.

Like Dracula, they are the living dead, repulsed by sunlight, garlic and religious objects. In chapter three of the novel, two are described as having dark hair, and the other as blonde.

Count Dracula

Count Dracula () is the title character of Bram Stoker's 1897 gothic horror novel Dracula. He is considered to be both the prototypical and the archetypal vampire in subsequent works of fiction. He is also depicted in the novel to be the origin of werewolf legends. Some aspects of the character are believed to have been inspired by the 15th-century Wallachian Prince Vlad the Impaler, who was also known as Dracula, and Sir Henry Irving, an actor for whom Stoker was a personal assistant.One of Dracula's most mysterious powers is the ability to turn others into vampires by biting them. Other character aspects have been added or altered in subsequent popular fictional works. Starring as Dracula in a sequence of Hammer Horror films which began with Dracula in 1958, Christopher Lee fixed the image of the fanged vampire in pop culture. The character has appeared frequently in popular culture, from films to animated media to breakfast cereals.

Count Dracula in popular culture

The character of Count Dracula from the 1897 novel Dracula by Bram Stoker, has remained popular over the years, and many films have used the Count as a villain, while others have named him in their titles, such as Dracula's Daughter, The Brides of Dracula, and Dracula's Dog. Dracula has enjoyed enormous popularity since its publication and has spawned an extraordinary vampire subculture in the second half of the 20th century. More than 200 films have been made that feature Count Dracula, a number second only to Sherlock Holmes. At the center of this subculture is the legend of Transylvania, which has become almost synonymous with vampires.

Most adaptations do not include all the major characters from the novel. The Count is usually present, and Jonathan and Mina Harker, Dr. Seward, Professor Van Helsing, and Renfield usually appear as well. The characters of Mina Harker and Lucy Westenra are occasionally combined into a single female role. Jonathan Harker and Renfield are also sometimes reversed or combined. Quincey Morris and Arthur Holmwood are often omitted or, occasionally, combined into one character.

Turksploitation

Turksploitation is a tongue-in-cheek label given to a great number of unauthorized Turkish film adaptations of best-selling Hollywood movies and television series, produced mainly in the 1970s and 1980s.Der Spiegel labeled these films the "most sympathetic and anarchical subgenre of exploitation film". Filmed on a shoestring budget with often comically simple special effects and no regard for copyright, Turksploitation films substituted exuberant inventiveness and zany plots for technical and acting skill, although noted Turkish actors did feature in some of these productions.The original soundtracks of the original film or of other Hollywood films were often reused. On occasion whole segments of the original film, such as special effects shots, were copied into the adaptation.

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