Doug Rader

Douglas Lee Rader (born July 30, 1944), nicknamed "The Red Rooster", is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who was known primarily for his defensive ability, winning five straight Gold Glove Awards from 1970 to 1974.

Rader's career lasted from 1967 to 1977, playing for the Houston Astros, San Diego Padres, and Toronto Blue Jays, then later managed the Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox, and California Angels between 1983 and 1991.

Also nicknamed "Rojo", Rader earned his nickname "The Red Rooster" from the thick head of red hair which always protruded from under his cap.

Rader attended Glenbrook North High School in Northbrook, Illinois, and Illinois Wesleyan University.

Doug Rader
Third baseman / Manager
Born: July 30, 1944 (age 74)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 31, 1967, for the Houston Astros
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1977, for the Toronto Blue Jays
MLB statistics
Batting average.251
Home runs155
Runs batted in722
Managerial record388–417
Winning %.482
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Houston Astros (1967–1975)

Rader signed with the Houston Astros as an amateur free agent in 1965, and made his Major League Baseball debut with the club on July 31, 1967. In his first game against the New York Mets, Rader earned his first career hit, a single against Canadian-born reliever Ron Taylor, as his Astros won the game 3-2. On August 19, Rader hit his first career home run against Dick Hughes of the St. Louis Cardinals. He played a majority of his games at first base, and finished the season with a .333 batting average with 4 HR and 26 RBI in 47 games.

During the 1968 season, the Astros moved Rader over to play third base, and in 98 games, Rader hit .267 with 6 HR and 43 RBI in establishing himself as their everyday third baseman during the second half of the season.

In 1969, Rader played in 155 games with Houston, hitting .246 with 11 HR and 83 RBI. He had a breakout season in 1970, as Rader appeared in 156 games, hitting .252, and was second on the Astros with 25 HR and third on the club with 87 RBI. Rader earned his first career Gold Glove Award as being the best defensive third baseman in the National League.

Rader struggled offensively during the 1971 season, as he hit .244 with 12 HR and 56 RBI in 135 games, however, he earned his second consecutive Gold Glove Award at third base. In 1972, Rader's batting average continued to slip, as he hit .237, however, his power numbers came back, as he hit 22 HR and 90 RBI in 152 games to be among the Astros team leaders, winning his third straight Gold Glove Award.

Rader had another solid season in 1973, hitting .254 with 21 HR and 89 RBI in 154 games with Houston, and once again was awarded the Gold Glove Award for third base, for the fourth straight season. He continued his solid play throughout the 1974 season, hitting .257, his highest batting average since 1968, while hitting 17 HR and 78 RBI, earning his fifth consecutive Gold Glove Award.

In 1975, Rader's offensive numbers slipped, as he hit only .223 with 12 HR and 48 RBI in 129 games, and for the first time since 1969, he failed to win the Gold Glove Award, as Ken Reitz of the St. Louis Cardinals received the award. On December 11, Rader was traded to the San Diego Padres for Larry Hardy and Joe McIntosh.[1]

San Diego Padres (1976–1977)

Rader became the everyday third baseman for the San Diego Padres during the 1976 season, and in 139 games hit for a .257 average with 9 HR and 55 RBI. His nine home runs were the lowest total of his career since the 1968 season.

In 1977, Rader began the season with San Diego and in 52 games hit .271 with 5 HR and 27 RBI. On June 8, Rader's contract was purchased by the Toronto Blue Jays.[2]

Toronto Blue Jays (1977)

Rader finished the 1977 season with the Toronto Blue Jays, where he split his time playing third base and as their designated hitter. In 96 games with Toronto, Rader hit .240 with 13 HR and 40 RBI. On March 18, 1978, midway through spring training, the Blue Jays released Rader,[3] who would then retire from the game.

Major League Career (1967–1977)

Rader played in 1465 games during his career, in which he collected 1302 hits, and had a batting average of .251 with 155 HR and 722 RBI. He won five straight Gold Glove Awards for his defensive play at third base from 1970–1974.[4]

Managing and coaching career

San Diego Padres (1979) and Hawaii Islanders (1980–1982)

After working a year for them as a major league coach,[5] the San Diego Padres named Rader manager of their AAA affiliate, the Hawaii Islanders of the Pacific Coast League.[6] During 1980, Rader led the club to a 76–65 record as the Islanders finished in second place in the North Division. In 1981, Hawaii had a 72–65 record, and once again finished in second place. The Islanders moved to the South Division in 1982, however, the club finished in third place with a 73–71 record.

Texas Rangers (1983–1985)

Rader was hired to manage the Texas Rangers in November 1982, taking over from Darrell Johnson.[7] In his first season with the Rangers, the club finished 77–85, which was a 13-game improvement from the previous season, as Texas finished in third place in the AL West.

The Rangers slipped back into last place in 1984, as the club struggled to a 69–92 record. In 1985, the Rangers began the season 9–23, as Rader was fired and replaced with Bobby Valentine.[8]

Chicago White Sox (1986)

In 1986, the Chicago White Sox began the season with Tony La Russa as their manager, however, after a 26–38 start, the White Sox fired LaRussa and named Rader, who was the team's hitting instructor at the time,[9] as the interim manager.[10] In his two games managing the White Sox, the club had a 1–1 record. The White Sox then named Jim Fregosi as their permanent manager.

California Angels (1989–1991)

Rader was hired to become the California Angels manager beginning in 1989,[11] after the Angels finished the 1988 season with a 75–87 record, and fired manager Cookie Rojas late in the season. In his first season with the Angels, Rader led the team to a 16-game improvement, as California finished the season with a 91–71 record, good for third place in the AL West. Rader finished fourth in the AL Manager of the Year Award, which was won by Frank Robinson of the Baltimore Orioles.[12]

In 1990, the Angels slipped under the .500 level, as the club finished 80–82 to finish fourth in the AL West. The Angels continued to hover around the .500 mark during the 1991 season, however, after a 61–63 start, Rader was fired and replaced with Buck Rodgers.[13]

Florida Marlins (1993–1994)

Rader was hired to be the original hitting coach for the expansion Florida Marlins in November 1992.[14] Rader resigned from the position at the end of the 1994 season.[15]

References

  1. ^ Astros trade Rader
  2. ^ Jays acquire Doug Rader
  3. ^ Rader released by Blue Jays
  4. ^ Rader joins White Sox
  5. ^ He's not just a wild and crazy guy
  6. ^ Doug Rader to Hawaii
  7. ^ Rangers hire Rader
  8. ^ Texas fires Doug Rader
  9. ^ Doug Rader is happy as White Sox coach
  10. ^ White Sox pick Rader as interim Manager
  11. ^ Doug Rader hired to manage Angels
  12. ^ Robinson rewarded for Orioles' phenomenon
  13. ^ Angels fire Doug Rader
  14. ^ Also....
  15. ^ In other news:

External links

Preceded by
Team Created
Florida Marlins hitting coach
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Jose Morales
1972 Houston Astros season

The 1972 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the National League West with a record of 84–69, 10½ games behind the Cincinnati Reds and just a percentage point ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1975 Houston Astros season

The 1975 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished last in the National League West with a record of 64–97, 43​1⁄2 games behind the Cincinnati Reds. The Astros' .398 winning percentage is, as of 2010, the worst in franchise history. Houston also lost 97 games in 1965 and 1991.

1976 San Diego Padres season

The 1976 San Diego Padres season was the 8th season in franchise history.

1977 San Diego Padres season

The 1977 San Diego Padres season was the 9th season in franchise history.

1983 Chicago White Sox season

The 1983 Chicago White Sox season was a season in American baseball. It involved the White Sox winning the American League West championship on September 17. It marked their first postseason appearance since the 1959 World Series. It was the city of Chicago's first baseball championship of any kind (division, league, or world), since the White Sox themselves reached the World Series twenty-four years earlier.

After the White Sox went through a winning streak around the All-Star break, Texas Rangers manager Doug Rader said the White Sox "...weren't playing well. They're winning ugly." This phrase became a rallying cry for the team, and they are often referred to as the "Winning Ugly" team (and their uniforms as the "Winning Ugly" uniforms).

1983 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1983 season involved the Rangers finishing third in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. The Rangers did break a Major League Baseball record for the most runs ever scored by one team during a single extra inning.

1984 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1984 season involved the Rangers' finishing 7th in the American League west, with a record of 69 wins and 92 losses.

1985 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1985 season involved the Rangers finishing 7th in the American League west with a record of 62 wins and 99 losses.

1989 California Angels season

The 1989 California Angels season saw the Angels finish third in the American League West with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses.

1990 California Angels season

The 1990 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 4th in the American League west with a record of 80 wins and 82 losses.

1991 California Angels season

The California Angels 1991 season involved the Angels finishing 7th in the American League West with a record of 81 wins and 81 losses.

Buck Rodgers

Robert Leroy "Buck" Rodgers (born August 16, 1938) is a former catcher, manager and coach in Major League Baseball. He managed three major league teams: the Milwaukee Brewers (1980–82), Montreal Expos (1985–91) and California Angels (1991–94), compiling a career won-lost mark of 784–773 (.504).

Chuck Harrison (baseball)

Charles William Harrison (born April 25, 1941) is an American former professional baseball player. He was a first baseman in Major League Baseball who played between 1965 through 1971 for the Houston Astros (1965–1967) and Kansas City Royals (1969, 1971). Listed at 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m), 190 lb (86 kg), Harrison batted and threw right-handed. He was signed by the Houston Colt .45s (the Astros' original nickname) in 1963 out of the Texas Tech University.

A native of Abilene, Texas, Harrison was 24 years old when he entered the majors with the Astros in 1965. He was a good athlete with an excellent glove work, who unfortunately lacked the prototypical power for a first baseman. His most productive season came in 1966, when he posted career numbers in games (119), batting average (.256), runs (52), RBI (52), hits (111) and extra-base hits (34), including three four-hit games. But in 1967 Harrison became expendable with the emergence of Doug Rader at first base. (Rader actually became an excellent third baseman.) At the end of the season, he was sent by Houston along Sonny Jackson to the Atlanta Braves in the same transaction that brought Denny Lemaster and Denis Menke to the Astros. A year later, he was purchased by the Royals from Atlanta.

In a five-season career, Harrison was a .238 hitter (241-for-1012) with 17 home runs and 126 RBI in 328 games, including 94 runs, 43 doubles, six triples, and three stolen bases. At first base, he committed just 22 errors in 2464 chances for a .991 fielding percentage.

Hawaii Islanders

The Hawaii Islanders were a minor league baseball team based in Honolulu, Hawaii, that played in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League for 27 seasons, from 1961 through 1987.

Originally an affiliate of the Kansas City Athletics, the Islanders played their home games at Honolulu Stadium, Aloha Stadium, and Les Murakami Stadium. After being one of the most successful minor league teams, the Islanders faltered and ultimately moved to the mainland as the Colorado Springs Sky Sox in 1988.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at third base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves with the Baltimore Orioles, leading both the American League and all third basemen in awards won. Mike Schmidt is second in wins at third base; he won 10 with the Philadelphia Phillies and leads National League third basemen in Gold Gloves. Scott Rolen has the third-highest total, winning eight awards with the Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cincinnati Reds. Six-time winners at third base are Buddy Bell, Nolan Arenado, Eric Chavez, and Robin Ventura. Ken Boyer, Doug Rader, and Ron Santo have each won five Gold Gloves at third base, and four-time winners include Adrián Beltré, Gary Gaetti, and Matt Williams. Hall of Famers who have won a Gold Glove at the position include Robinson, Schmidt, Santo, Wade Boggs, and George Brett.The fewest errors committed in a third baseman's winning season is five, achieved by Boggs in 1995 and Chavez in 2006. Two National League winners have made six errors in a season to lead that league: Mike Lowell in 2005, and Schmidt in 1986. Chavez' fielding percentage of .987 in 2006 leads all winners; Lowell leads the National League with his .983 mark. Robinson leads all winners with 410 assists in 1974, and made the most putouts in the American League (174 in 1966). The most putouts by a winner was 187, made by Santo in 1967. Schmidt leads the National League in assists, with 396 in 1977. The most double plays turned in a season was 44 by Robinson in 1974; he turned at least 40 double plays during three of his winning seasons. The National League leader is Nolan Arenado with 42 in 2015Ken Boyer and Clete Boyer are the only pair of brothers to have won Gold Glove Awards at third base. Older brother Ken won five Gold Gloves in six years with the Cardinals (1958–1961, 1963), and Clete won in 1969 with the Atlanta Braves.

List of Los Angeles Angels managers

There have been 21 managers in the history of the Los Angeles Angels Major League Baseball franchise. The Angels are based in Anaheim, California. They are members of the American League West division of the American League (AL) in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Angels franchise was formed in 1961 as a member of the American League. The team was formerly called the California Angels, the Anaheim Angels, and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, before settling with the Los Angeles Angels.

Bill Rigney became the first manager of the then Los Angeles Angels in 1961, serving for just over eight seasons before being fired by Angels owner Gene Autry during the 1969 season. In terms of tenure, Mike Scioscia has managed more games and seasons than any other coach in franchise history. He managed the Angels to six playoff berths (2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, and 2009) led the team to a World Series championship in 2002, and won the Manager of the Year award in 2002 and 2009. With the Angels' 2009 Playoff appearance, Mike Scioscia became the first Major League Baseball manager "to guide his team to playoffs six times in [his] first 10 seasons." None of Scioscia's predecessors made it to the World Series. Dick Williams and Whitey Herzog, who served as an interim manager immediately before Williams, are the only Angels managers to have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

There have been 16 interim managers in Angels history. In 1969, manager Bill Rigney was fired and replaced by Lefty Phillips. In 1974, manager Whitey Herzog replaced Bobby Winkles. After four games with Herzog at the helm, Dick Williams took over the managerial job and was then replaced with Norm Sherry. A year later, Sherry was replaced by Dave Garcia. Garcia didn't last a full season either, as Jim Fregosi took over as manager in 1978. In 1981, Fregosi was replaced in the mid-season by Gene Mauch. In 1988, manager Cookie Rojas was replaced eight games before the end of the season. After a start of 61 wins and 63 losses in 1991, manager Doug Rader was fired and was replaced by Buck Rodgers. A season later, Rodgers was replaced by Marcel Lachemann, who took the position for four games. He was then succeeded by John Wathan. Rodgers returned as manager in 1993, but he was soon replaced by Lachemann. In 1996, Lachemann was replaced by John McNamara, who in turn was replaced by Joe Maddon. In 1999, Terry Collins resigned as manager in mid-season. Joe Maddon finished the season. Mauch, Rodgers, Lachemann, McNamara, and Maddon have had two stints as manager.

As of 2019, Brad Ausmus replaced Mike Scioscia as manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

List of Texas Rangers managers

The Texas Rangers are an American baseball franchise based in Arlington, Texas. They are members of the American League West division. The Rangers franchise was formed in 1961, then called the Washington Senators, as a member of the American League. In its 58-year history, the Texas Rangers baseball franchise of Major League Baseball's American League has employed 27 managers. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field.Mickey Vernon became the first manager of the Texas Rangers in 1961, serving for just over two seasons. Ron Washington has managed more games and seasons than any other manager in Rangers history. Before 2010, the only Rangers manager to have led the team to the playoffs was Johnny Oates, who also won the 1996 Manager of the Year Award with the Rangers. Ted Williams is the only Rangers manager to have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as a player; Whitey Herzog, who was inducted in the Hall in 2010, is only Rangers manager to earn induction as a manager.

In 1963, manager Mickey Vernon was fired and replaced by interim manager Eddie Yost. One game later, Yost was replaced by Gil Hodges. In 1973, Whitey Herzog was replaced by Del Wilber. One game later, Billy Martin took over the role of manager. In 1975, Frank Lucchesi took over for Martin in midseason, who in turn was replaced by Eddie Stanky. After six games, Connie Ryan could not finish the season, so Billy Hunter took over the role of manager, only to be fired with one game to go in the 1978 season and replaced by Pat Corrales. In 1982, Don Zimmer was fired as Rangers manager but continued to run the team for three more games before being replaced by Darrell Johnson. Rangers owner Eddie Chiles said the poor play of the Rangers had nothing to do with Zimmer's firing but was instead 'something personal'. In 1985, after Doug Rader led the Rangers to (exact number of seasons) losing seasons, he was replaced by Bobby Valentine, who in turn was replaced by Toby Harrah during midseason. In 2001, Johnny Oates's poor performance forced the Rangers to hire Jerry Narron as his replacement during midseason.

Buck Showalter was hired as manager of the Texas Rangers on October 11, 2002, following a last-place season under manager Jerry Narron. Showalter managed the Rangers through the 2006 season, before being fired as manager on October 4, 2006. In November 2006, Ron Washington was hired as manager of the Rangers. He managed the team from 2007 to 2014, longer than any other person in the franchise's history, when he announced his resignation on September 5, 2014. Tim Bogar managed the rest of the season on an interim basis. Jeff Banister was hired to lead the team from 2015 to September 21, 2018, when he was fired. Don Wakamatsu replaced him as interim manager. Chris Woodward was later hired as the new manager for 2019.

Rader

Rader, Roeder, or sometimes Raeder are surnames with German roots believed to be Americanized spellings of the German surnames Röder and Räder and may refer to:

In law:

Dennis Rader, American serial killer

Randall Ray Rader, circuit judgeIn religion:

Paul Rader, the 15th General of The Salvation ArmyIn sports:

Dave Rader (American football), coach of the University of Tulsa Golden Hurricane

Dave Rader (baseball), American baseball player

Don Rader (baseball), American baseball player

Doug Rader, former third baseman in Major League Baseball who was known primarily for his defensive ability

Peary Rader, early bodybuilder, Olympic lifter, writer, and magazine publisher from NebraskaIn other fields:

Daniel Rader, professor at the University of Pennsylvania

Frank Rader, Mayor of Los Angeles from 1894 until 1896

Erich Raeder, a Grand Admiral of the German Kriegsmarine during the Nazi era

Gary Rader, U.S. Army Special Forces Reservist who burned his draft card

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

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