Doug McDermott

Douglas Richard McDermott (born January 3, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Indiana Pacers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). While playing college basketball for Creighton University, he led the nation in scoring in 2013–14 and was a three-time consensus first-team All-American. He was the consensus national player of the year as a senior in 2014, and finished his college career with the fifth-most points in NCAA Division I men's basketball history. After graduating from Creighton, McDermott became automatically eligible for the 2014 NBA draft, where he was drafted 11th overall by the Denver Nuggets. He was traded to the Chicago Bulls and went on to play two and half seasons for the Bulls before being traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder in February 2017. McDermott has also played for the New York Knicks and the Dallas Mavericks.

McDermott is the son of current Creighton coach Greg McDermott; Greg coached McDermott during his college career.

Doug McDermott
Doug McDermott CHI vs PHI 2014-11-07 (cropped)
McDermott with the Chicago Bulls in November 2014
No. 20 – Indiana Pacers
PositionSmall forward
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornJanuary 3, 1992 (age 27)
Grand Forks, North Dakota
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High schoolAmes (Ames, Iowa)
CollegeCreighton (2010–2014)
NBA draft2014 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11th overall
Selected by the Denver Nuggets
Playing career2014–present
Career history
20142017Chicago Bulls
2017Oklahoma City Thunder
2017–2018New York Knicks
2018Dallas Mavericks
2018–presentIndiana Pacers
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

High school career

McDermott was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota, where his father was an assistant coach of the University of North Dakota's men's basketball team. McDermott, a 6'8" 225-pound forward, played high school basketball at Ames High School in Ames, Iowa alongside high school All-American Harrison Barnes. Ames won 53 consecutive games during McDermott's and Barnes' junior and senior seasons and won consecutive Iowa state titles. As a senior, McDermott averaged 20.1 points and 7.8 rebounds per game and was named first team All-State.[1]

Considered a three-star recruit by ESPN.com, McDermott was listed as the No. 28 small forward in the nation in 2010.[2]

College career

Originally, McDermott signed a National Letter of Intent to play with Northern Iowa, but after his father moved from coaching Iowa State University to Creighton, he was released from his commitment in order to play for him in college.

As a freshman in 2010–11, McDermott averaged 14.9 points and 7.2 rebounds per game as he started all 39 games for the Bluejays. McDermott set a Missouri Valley Conference (MVC) record for points by a freshman (581) and was named conference freshman and newcomer of the year. McDermott also became the first player to earn first team all-conference honors as a freshman since Cleo Littleton of Wichita State in 1954.[3] McDermott led the Bluejays to the 2011 College Basketball Invitational, where they made it to the best of three final series, ultimately losing to Oregon.[1]

Prior to his sophomore season, McDermott was named to the preseason watch lists for the Wooden Award[4] and Naismith Award.[5]

As a sophomore, McDermott was one of five men named first team All-America for the 2011–12 season. McDermott is Creighton's first player honored by the NABC on its first-team All-America squad. McDermott also was named the Missouri Valley Conference Player of the Year, the first Creighton player since Booker Woodfox in 2009. McDermott finished his 2011–12 season averaging 22.9 points per game, a figure that ranked third nationally. His 801 points, 307 field goals and 48.6 percent shooting accuracy from three-point range were all school records for a single-season. Creighton finished 29–6 and advanced to the third-round of the NCAA Tournament. On March 26, 2012, McDermott was named a first-team AP All-American.[6]

As a junior in 2012–13, McDermott ranked first in the nation in points scored and second in points per game. He set school records for points in a single season and points in a career. He was again named a first team All-American by the AP.[1]

On April 25, 2013, McDermott announced he would be returning to Creighton for his senior season and would not enter the 2013 NBA Draft.[7] That July, he relinquished his scholarship and became a walk-on for his final season at Creighton. This came about after the NCAA had granted senior guard Grant Gibbs, who had missed full seasons at both Gonzaga and Creighton with injuries, a rare sixth year of eligibility, putting Creighton over the NCAA's limit of 13 scholarships for the 2013–14 season.[8]

On February 28, 2014, McDermott was named one of the 10 semi-finalists for Naismith College Player of the Year.[9] On Senior Night against Providence, he scored a career-high 45 points and passed the 3,000 point threshold.[10] McDermott was named first-team All-Big East in Creighton's first season in the league.[11] He won the Big East Player of the Year award, as well as earning First-Team All-American honors by U.S. Basketball Writers Association for the third time.[12] McDermott was also the consensus national player of the year, winning all major awards (Wooden,[13] Naismith,[14] AP,[15] NABC,[16] USBWA,[17] and Sporting News[18]).

McDermott led the nation in scoring at 26.7 points per game.[19] At the end of his college career, he ranked fifth on the all-time NCAA Division I scoring list, with 3,150 points, which passed basketball Hall of Famer Larry Bird.[20] He became the first player in 29 years to be named to the AP All-America first team three times.[21] McDermott is one of three players in NCAA men's basketball history to record 3,000 points and 1,000 rebounds. He also set an NCAA record by scoring in double figures in 135 games.[1]

Professional career

Chicago Bulls (2014–2017)

2014–15 season

On June 26, 2014, McDermott was selected in the first round with the 11th overall pick in the 2014 NBA draft by the Denver Nuggets. He was later traded to the Chicago Bulls on draft night, along with Anthony Randolph, for both of Chicago's 2014 first round picks (16th and 19th) and a future second-round pick.[22] On July 22, 2014, he signed his rookie scale contract with the Bulls after averaging 18.0 points, 4.0 rebounds and 2.8 assists per game during the 2014 NBA Summer League.[23] In his NBA debut on October 29, he recorded 12 points, 5 rebounds, 2 assists and 1 steal in a 104–80 win over the New York Knicks.[24] While expected to contribute with scoring and shooting for the Bulls, McDermott struggled significantly over his first 17 games, averaging just 3.2 points on 42.3 percent shooting.[25] Despite his promising debut, McDermott did not manage to eclipse 12 points before being ruled out indefinitely on December 1 due to a knee injury. He subsequently required an arthroscopic procedure on his right knee which took place on December 13.[26] He returned to action on January 22, 2015, against the San Antonio Spurs, recording no stats in two minutes of action.[27] On March 6, he scored a season-high 16 points in a loss to the Indiana Pacers.[28][29]

2015–16 season

In July 2015, McDermott re-joined the Bulls for the 2015 NBA Summer League, where he averaged 18.8 points and 4.4 rebounds in five games, impressing new head coach Fred Hoiberg.[30] On October 30, the Bulls exercised their third-year team option on McDermott's rookie scale contract, extending the contract through the 2016–17 season.[31]

McDermott's Summer League form carried over into the regular season, with Hoiberg giving him plenty of game time off the bench. Over the first three games of the season, he averaged 7.3 points per game, boosting that number up to 10.2 over the first five games with 12 points scored against the Orlando Magic on November 1 and 17 points scored against the Charlotte Hornets on November 3. His impressive play off the bench earned him his first career starting assignment on November 5 against the Oklahoma City Thunder. In 23 minutes of action as the starting small forward, he scored nine points in a 104–98 win over the Thunder.[32][33] Four days later, he scored a then career-high 18 points in a 111–88 win over the Philadelphia 76ers.[34] On November 16, Tony Snell was reinserted into the starting line-up, moving McDermott back to a bench role.[35] On February 19, 2016, he scored a career-high 30 points off the bench in a 116–106 win over the Toronto Raptors.[36] On March 14, he had his second 20+ point game of the season with a team-high 29 points off the bench in a 109–107 win over the Toronto Raptors.[37] Three days later, he scored 25 points against the Brooklyn Nets for his third straight game with 20+ points, tying a career-high five three-pointers.[38][39]

2016–17 season

On October 28, 2016, the Bulls exercised their fourth-year team option on McDermott's rookie scale contract, extending the contract through the 2017–18 season.[40] Among other moves that offseason, the Bulls also acquired Chicago native Dwyane Wade, for whom McDermott graciously switched from No. 3 to No. 11 for the 2016–17 season. In the Bulls' second game of the season, McDermott scored a game-high 23 points off the bench in a 118–101 win over the Indiana Pacers.[41] He received a concussion on October 31 against the Brooklyn Nets and entered concussion protocol; on November 12, he suffered another concussion against the Washington Wizards.[42] As a result, McDermott missed the next nine games, and on December 5, he was assigned to the Windy City Bulls of the NBA Development League for conditioning.[43] He was recalled two days later[44] and made his return to Chicago's line-up on December 8, scoring eight points in a 95–91 win over the San Antonio Spurs.[45] On January 7, 2017, McDermott recorded his first-career double-double, grabbing a career-high 10 rebounds to go with 17 points in a 123–118 win over the Toronto Raptors.[46] On January 15, 2017, he scored a career-high 31 points in a 108–104 win over the Memphis Grizzlies.[47]

Oklahoma City Thunder (2017)

On February 23, 2017, McDermott was traded, along with Taj Gibson and an unprotected 2018 second round draft pick, to the Oklahoma City Thunder in exchange for Joffrey Lauvergne, Anthony Morrow and Cameron Payne.[48] On March 18, 2017, McDermott had his highest-scoring game with the Thunder, going 8 of 9 from the field, including 4 of 5 from three-point range, to finish with 21 points in a 110–94 win over the Sacramento Kings.[49]

New York Knicks (2017–2018)

On September 25, 2017, McDermott was traded, along with Enes Kanter and a 2018 second-round pick, to the New York Knicks in exchange for Carmelo Anthony.[50] In his debut for the Knicks in their season opener on October 19, 2017, McDermott scored four points on 2-for-5 shooting in a 105–84 loss to his former team, the Oklahoma City Thunder.[51]

Dallas Mavericks (2018)

On February 8, 2018, McDermott was acquired by the Dallas Mavericks in a three-team trade that also involved the Knicks and the Denver Nuggets.[52] In his debut for the Mavericks two days later, McDermott scored eight points in a 130–123 win over the Los Angeles Lakers.[53] He received a qualifying offer from the Mavericks on June 27, 2018, which was later withdrawn.[54]

Indiana Pacers (2018–present)

On July 6, 2018, McDermott signed a three-year, $22 million contract with the Indiana Pacers.[55][56] On November 26, he scored a season-high 21 points in a 121–88 win over the Utah Jazz.[57]

International career

Following the close of his freshman year at Creighton, McDermott was selected to the U.S. team sent to Riga, Latvia for the 2011 FIBA Under-19 World Championship. McDermott started all nine matches and averaged 11.3 points per game on .501 shooting and 6.1 rebounds per contest, good for third on the team in both categories. The United States finished 7–2, good for fifth in the tournament.[58]

On July 22, 2014, McDermott was named to the 2014 USA Select Team.[59]

Career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2014–15 Chicago 36 0 8.9 .402 .317 .667 1.2 .2 .1 .0 3.0
2015–16 Chicago 81 4 23.0 .452 .425 .857 2.4 .7 .2 .1 9.4
2016–17 Chicago 44 4 24.4 .444 .371 .884 3.0 1.0 .2 .1 10.1
2016–17 Oklahoma City 22 1 19.5 .452 .362 .706 2.2 .6 .1 .0 6.6
2017–18 New York 55 1 21.3 .460 .387 .755 2.4 .9 .2 .2 7.2
2017–18 Dallas 26 3 22.9 .478 .494 .857 2.5 1.1 .3 .2 9.0
2018–19 Indiana 77 1 17.4 .491 .408 .835 1.4 .9 .2 .1 7.3
Career 341 14 19.9 .459 .404 .825 2.1 .8 .2 .1 7.8

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2015 Chicago 3 0 3.3 .333 .500 1.000 .7 .3 .0 .0 1.7
2017 Oklahoma City 5 0 13.2 .500 .538 .000 1.0 .2 .2 .2 5.0
Career 8 0 9.5 .476 .533 1.000 .9 .3 .1 .1 3.8

College

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2010–11 Creighton 39 39 29.1 .525 .405 .746 7.2 1.2 .3 .1 14.9
2011–12 Creighton 35 34 31.9 .601 .486 .796 8.2 1.1 .2 .1 22.9
2012–13 Creighton 36 36 31.6 .548 .490 .875 7.7 1.6 .2 .1 23.2
2013–14 Creighton 35 35 33.7 .526 .449 .864 7.0 1.6 .2 .1 26.7
Career 145 144 31.5 .550 .458 .831 7.5 1.3 .2 .1 21.7

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Doug McDermott Bio". GoCreighton.com. Retrieved February 11, 2016.
  2. ^ "Doug McDermott Recruiting Profile". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved February 11, 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. ^ "Weems is Larry Bird Player of the Year". Missouri Valley Conference. March 1, 2011. Retrieved January 4, 2012.
  4. ^ "John R. Wooden Award Announces Men's Preseason Top 50 List". Wooden Award. October 3, 2011. Archived from the original on April 3, 2012. Retrieved December 30, 2011.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  5. ^ "2011–12 Naismith Trophy Preseason Watch List". Slam Magazine. November 8, 2011. Retrieved December 30, 2011.
  6. ^ "NABC Names McDermott First-Team All-American". mvcstcharles.com. March 21, 2012. Archived from the original on February 16, 2016. Retrieved February 11, 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  7. ^ Gleeson, Scott (April 25, 2013). "Creighton's Doug McDermott announces his return". USAToday.com. Retrieved April 25, 2013.
  8. ^ Goodman, Jeff (July 2, 2013). "Grant Gibbs granted sixth year". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 19, 2013.
  9. ^ "Top 10 National Semifinalists Named for 2014 Men's Naismith Trophy presented by AT&T". Naismith Awards. February 28, 2014. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ Norlander, Matt (March 9, 2014). "McDermott breaks 3,000 points, scores career-high 45 on Senior Night". CBSSports.com. Retrieved March 9, 2014.
  11. ^ Tynes, Tyler Ricky (March 9, 2014). "All-Big East Men's Basketball Team Announced". VUHoops. SB-Nation. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  12. ^ "Creighton's Doug McDermott named BIG EAST Player of the Year". KETA Omaha. March 12, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2014.
  13. ^ "Creighton's McDermott Wins John R. Wooden Award Presented By Wendy's" (Press release). Los Angeles Athletic Club. April 4, 2014. Archived from the original on June 25, 2014. Retrieved April 4, 2014.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  14. ^ "McDermott Named 2014 Naismith Men's College Player of the Year, presented by AT&T" (Press release). Atlanta Tipoff Club. April 6, 2014. Archived from the original on June 25, 2014. Retrieved April 6, 2014.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  15. ^ "McDermott, Marshall honored by AP". ESPN.com. April 3, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2014.
  16. ^ "Creighton's McDermott Named NABC Division I Player of the Year; Metro State's Jefferson and Cabrini's Walton-Moss Earn Division II, III Honors" (PDF). The Sporting News. April 2, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
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  18. ^ Kuznia, Roger (March 12, 2014). "Doug McDermott earns Sporting News Player of the Year". SportingNews.com. Sporting News. Retrieved April 6, 2014.
  19. ^ "2013-14 NCAA Division I College Basketball Player Statistics". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  20. ^ "Doug McDermott College Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved March 23, 2014.
  21. ^ "Doug McDermott makes 3rd AP team". ESPN.com. March 31, 2014. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  22. ^ "Bulls deal picks for Doug McDermott". NBA.com. June 26, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  23. ^ "BULLS SIGN FORWARD DOUG MCDERMOTT". NBA.com. July 22, 2014. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  24. ^ Mahoney, Brian (October 29, 2014). "Gasol, Bulls blow out Knicks in Rose's return". NBA.com. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  25. ^ Freeman, Eric (December 12, 2014). "Doug McDermott to undergo knee surgery, continuing a rough season". Yahoo.com. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  26. ^ "DOUG MCDERMOTT INJURY UPDATE". NBA.com. December 12, 2014. Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  27. ^ Seligman, Andrew (January 23, 2015). "Derrick Rose scores 22, struggling Bulls beat Spurs 104-81". NBA.com. Retrieved January 23, 2015.
  28. ^ Marot, Michael (March 6, 2015). "Pacers hold off charging Bulls 98-84 for 4th straight win". NBA.com. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  29. ^ "Doug McDermott 2014-15 Game Log". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  30. ^ Pivovar, Steven (July 25, 2015). "Doug McDermott scores well, impresses new Bulls coach in Summer League". Omaha.com. Retrieved July 25, 2015.
  31. ^ "BULLS EXERCISE OPTIONS ON SNELL AND MCDERMOTT". NBA.com. October 30, 2015. Retrieved October 30, 2015.
  32. ^ Seligman, Andrew (November 6, 2015). "Rose scores 29 as Bulls beat Thunder 104-98". NBA.com. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  33. ^ "Doug McDermott 2015-16 Game Log". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  34. ^ Gelston, Dan (November 9, 2015). "Pacers hold off charging Bulls 98-84 for 4th straight win". NBA.com. Retrieved November 9, 2015.
  35. ^ Cohen, Jay (November 17, 2015). "Butler, Bulls hold on for 96-95 win over Pacers". NBA.com. Retrieved November 17, 2015.
  36. ^ Royse, Dave (February 20, 2016). "McDermott scores 30, Bulls halt 5-game slide, beat Raptors". NBA.com. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  37. ^ Attfield, Paul (March 14, 2016). "Bulls win ninth straight against Raptors, 109-107". NBA.com. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  38. ^ Carlson, Matt (March 17, 2016). "McDermott, Butler lead Bulls past Nets 118-102". NBA.com. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  39. ^ Johnson, K.C. (March 17, 2016). "Bulls playoff push gets Nets at right time for 118-102 victory". ChicagoTribune.com. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  40. ^ "BULLS EXERCISE OPTIONS ON MCDERMOTT, GRANT AND PORTIS". NBA.com. October 28, 2016. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  41. ^ "Butler, Wade, Rondo lead Bulls to 118-101 rout of Pacers". ESPN.com. October 29, 2016. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  42. ^ Brown, Larry (November 13, 2016). "Doug McDermott enteres concussion protocol after Halloween". MSN.com. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  43. ^ "Chicago Bulls Assign Doug McDermott to Windy City". NBA.com. December 5, 2016. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  44. ^ "Bulls recall McDermott from D-League's Windy City Bulls". FoxSports.com. December 7, 2016. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  45. ^ "Spurs fall to Bulls 95-91 after winning first 13 road games". ESPN.com. December 8, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  46. ^ Johnson, K.C. (January 8, 2017). "Fred Hoiberg gives new look to Bulls' closing lineup". ChicagoTribune.com. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  47. ^ "McDermott scores career-best 31 to lead Bulls past Grizzlies". ESPN.com. January 15, 2017. Retrieved January 15, 2017.
  48. ^ "Thunder Acquires Gibson, McDermott and Draft Pick". NBA.com. February 23, 2017. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  49. ^ "Westbrook leads Thunder past Kings without triple-double". ESPN.com. March 18, 2017. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  50. ^ "Knicks Trade Carmelo Anthony To Oklahoma City". NBA.com. September 25, 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2017.
  51. ^ "Thunder top Knicks 105-84 in OKC debuts for George, Anthony". ESPN.com. October 19, 2017. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  52. ^ "Mavs acquire Doug McDermott and second-round pick in three-team trade". Mavs.com. February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  53. ^ "Nowitzki, Mavs spoil Thomas debut in 130-123 win over Lakers". ESPN.com. February 10, 2018. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  54. ^ "Reports: Yogi Ferrell, Salah Mejri get qualifying offers; Doug McDermott's qualifying offer withdrawn". nba.com. June 27, 2018. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  55. ^ "Pacers Sign Tyreke Evans, Doug McDermott". NBA.com. July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  56. ^ "Sources: Doug McDermott, Pacers agree to 3-year, $22M deal". espn.com. July 1, 2018. Retrieved July 1, 2018.
  57. ^ "McDermott, Turner lead Pacers to 121-88 rout of Jazz". ESPN.com. November 26, 2018. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
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  59. ^ "BUTLER AND MCDERMOTT NAMED TO 2014 USA SELECT TEAM". NBA.com. July 22, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2014.

External links

2010–11 Missouri Valley Conference men's basketball season

The 2010–11 Missouri Valley Conference men's basketball season marks the 102nd season of Missouri Valley Conference basketball.

2012 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2012 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2012 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Lowe's Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began in November with the 2K Sports Classic and ended with the Final Four in Atlanta, April 6–8.

2013 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2013 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2013 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2013–14 Big East Conference men's basketball season

The 2013–14 Big East Conference men's basketball season began with practices in October 2013, followed by the start of the followed by the start of the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. This was the 35th year in the conference's history, but the first as a non-football conference, which officially formed on July 1, 2013. Conference play started on New Year's Eve 2013, and concluded in March with the 2014 Big East Conference Men's Basketball Tournament at Madison Square Garden in New York.

The original Big East Conference split effective immediately after the conclusion of the 2013 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament. The seven schools that did not sponsor FBS football purchased the "Big East" name and reorganized as a new Big East, while the FBS schools that had not left for other conferences retained the original Big East charter and are now operating as the American Athletic Conference (The American). Both leagues, however, claim the 1979 founding date of the original Big East as their own founding dates. While both offshoot leagues initially claimed the history of the original conference, that has apparently changed, as the basketball history of the original Big East is now claimed by the current Big East, and The American now considers its basketball history to have begun with the conference split. Cincinnati, Louisville, Rutgers, and South Florida, the four full members of the original Big East that sponsored FBS football before the split, joined with several new members to reorganize as The American.

The nucleus of the conference is the so-called "Catholic 7", the members of the original Big East Conference that do not sponsor FBS football, all Catholic institutions: DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Providence, Seton Hall, St. John's, and Villanova. The seven from the original Big East were joined by Butler and Xavier from the Atlantic 10, and Creighton from the Missouri Valley. As of 2017–18, the Big East membership has been unchanged since the conference's relaunch.

2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began in November with the 2K Sports Classic and ended with the Final Four in Arlington, Texas April 5–7. It was tipped off by the 2013 Champions Classic on November 12, 2013.

2014 NBA draft

The 2014 NBA draft was held on June 26, 2014, at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The draft lottery took place on May 20, 2014. The Cleveland Cavaliers won the draft lottery to earn the first overall pick in the draft; this is the fourth number-one pick for Cleveland since 2003 and third number-one pick over a four-year span from 2011–2014. This draft would also be the first for the reborn Charlotte Hornets, who played as the Bobcats from 2004–2014, since 2001, when the original Charlotte Hornets last selected as the Charlotte Hornets before moving to New Orleans and eventually becoming the current New Orleans Pelicans.

Television rights in the United States belonged to ESPN. It was tipped by many to be one of the deepest and most hyped draft classes in recent years, with several players touted as future stars. College underclassmen that were highly touted by NBA scouts and executives included: Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Joel Embiid, Aaron Gordon, Julius Randle, Zach LaVine, T. J. Warren, and Gary Harris. Other highly sought after talents included Australian player Dante Exum and Croatian player Dario Šarić, who both declared for the draft, and Doug McDermott, who was automatically eligible as a graduating college senior.

Highlights from the draft included the first selections made by Adam Silver as commissioner and Mark Tatum as deputy commissioner, the second Canadian to be the first overall pick (Andrew Wiggins), the first pair of Canadian top 10 picks and second pair of Canadian lottery picks (Wiggins and Nik Stauskas), three top 20 Canadian selections (Wiggins, Stauskas, and Tyler Ennis), the first NBA Development League player to be selected in the first round (P. J. Hairston), the first time multiple NBA Development League players were selected in the same draft (Hairston and Thanasis Antetokounmpo), and the first Cape Verdean player to be selected in the draft (Walter Tavares). In addition, a standing ovation for Isaiah Austin occurred between the 15th and 16th picks of the draft, which included having the NBA itself hold a ceremonial pick to select him as a means of letting his dream of having his name be heard in the NBA draft come true, which happened days after he was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome and originally was never considered to play professional basketball again. Nearly two months after the draft ended, Andrew Wiggins was traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves as part of a three-team deal that brought Kevin Love to Cleveland; this resulted in the second time since the NBA–ABA merger that a first overall draft pick would not play a single game for the team that drafted him (the first time being the Orlando Magic drafted Chris Webber first overall in 1993 and then minutes later, traded Webber to the Golden State Warriors for Golden State's third overall pick in the 1993 Draft, Anfernee (Penny) Hardaway plus three of Golden State's future first-round draft selections).

2014 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2014 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2014 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2015–16 Chicago Bulls season

The 2015–16 Chicago Bulls season was the 50th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Fred Hoiberg was selected as the head coach, after the firing of previous head coach Tom Thibodeau.Jimmy Butler, for the second time was voted to play in the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, which was held in Toronto. However, Butler was unable to play due to injury and replacing him was teammate Pau Gasol.

Derrick Rose played in 66 games this season, the most since his MVP campaign in 2010-11. Following the season, he was traded to the New York Knicks, Joakim Noah signed as a free agent with the Knicks and Gasol signed with the San Antonio Spurs.

The Bulls missed the playoffs for the first time since 2008 and were eliminated from playoff contention by the Detroit Pistons.

2017–18 New York Knicks season

The 2017–18 New York Knicks season was the 72nd season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

On June 28, 2017, the Knicks' president of basketball operations Phil Jackson has mutually agreed to leave the team. On July 14, 2017, the Knicks named Scott Perry to become the team's general manager after promoting Steve Mills to become the team's president of basketball operations. However, the Knicks would have to give up a 2019 second round pick and cash considerations to acquire him.

For the first time since 2011, Carmelo Anthony was not on the roster, as he was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder in the offseason, before training camp began, in exchange for Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott, and a 2018 second round draft pick.

On February 6, 2018 Kristaps Porzingis suffered a torn ACL, ending his season for the Knicks.

On April 12, 2018, the Knicks fired Jeff Hornacek and Kurt Rambis.

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80.

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Richard Hamilton (Connecticut), Troy Bell (Boston College), Troy Murphy (Notre Dame) and Kris Dunn (Providence) each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin (St. John's) won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985. Three award winners have been inducted as players to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002. Mullin followed in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001). Most recently, Georgetown's 1992 Player of the Year Alonzo Mourning entered the Hall in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008). There have been seven ties; the most recent instance was that between Dunn and Ryan Arcidiacono of Villanova in 2015.Seven players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry of St. John's received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award. In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award. In 2004, Connecticut's Emeka Okafor won the conference award while sharing NABC Player of the Year honors with Jameer Nelson of Saint Joseph's. Creighton's Doug McDermott received all major national awards along with the conference award in 2014. Finally, Villanova's Jalen Brunson was the national player of the year as well in 2018. Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. The only current Big East members without a winner are Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the conference at its relaunch following its 2013 split into two leagues, and DePaul, members since 2005.

Creighton Bluejays

The Creighton Bluejays, or Jays, are the athletic teams that represent Creighton University, a Jesuit/Catholic University in Omaha, Nebraska, United States. They compete in NCAA Division I in the Big East Conference.

Creighton Bluejays men's basketball

The Creighton Bluejays men's basketball team represents Creighton University of the NCAA Division I college basketball. They currently compete in the Big East Conference having joined the conference following the Big East conference realignment in 2013. The Bluejays play their home games at CHI Health Center Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska. Creighton finished sixth nationally in home attendance, averaging 17,048 fans per home game in 2014–15.Before joining the Big East, Creighton was a member of the Missouri Valley Conference from 1976 through 2013. The Jays were also members of the MVC from 1928 to 1948 and participated as an independent from 1948 to 1977 before rejoining the MVC. The Bluejays have won a record 15 MVC regular season conference titles and a record 12 MVC Tournament titles.The team has 20 appearances in the NCAA Tournament. The Jays last played in the NCAA Tournament in 2018. The Bluejays won at least one NCAA tournament game for three consecutive seasons, including a 58–57 win over Alabama, a 67–63 win over Cincinnati and a 76–66 win over Louisiana-Lafayette.

Creighton University

Creighton University is a private, Jesuit university in Omaha, Nebraska. Founded by the Society of Jesus in 1878, the school is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. The university is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.

Sitting on a 140-acre (57 ha) campus just outside Omaha's downtown business district, the university enrolls 8,393 graduate and undergraduate students.

Ethan Wragge

Ethan Donald Wragge (born October 1, 1990) is an American basketball player who last played for the Gießen 46ers of Germany's Basketball Bundesliga. Wragge played college basketball at Creighton University.

Wragge, a 6'7" small forward from Eden Prairie, Minnesota, played for Creighton from 2009 to 2014. For most of his time there he played with All-American Doug McDermott. As a senior, Wragge was one of the top three-point shooters in the NCAA, finishing the season at 47% from three, good for fifth in the country.Following his graduation from Creighton, Wragge went undrafted in the 2014 NBA draft. He signed with Bilbao Basket in Spain's top league. After spending one season with them, he signed with the Giessen 46ers in Germany's Basketball Bundesliga.

Greg McDermott

Greg McDermott (born November 25, 1964) has served as the head coach of the Creighton University Bluejays men's basketball team since April 26, 2010. Previously McDermott served as head coach at Wayne State College, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, and Iowa State. He is the father of NBA player Doug McDermott.

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Lute Olson Award

The Lute Olson Award is an award given annually to the most outstanding non-freshman men's college basketball player in NCAA Division I competition. The award was established in 2010 and is named for former Arizona Wildcats head coach Lute Olson.

Missouri Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament

The Missouri Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, commonly called Arch Madness, is an annual basketball tournament which features the men's basketball teams of each of the Missouri Valley Conference member universities. The tournament, held in St. Louis since 1991, determines which MVC team receives an automatic bid to the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament.

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