Doug DuBose

Donald Douglas DuBose (born March 14, 1964) is a former American football running back who played two seasons with the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League. He played college football at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and attended Montville High School in Oakdale, Connecticut. DuBose was also a member of the Sacramento Surge of the World League of American Football. He was a member of the San Francisco 49ers team that won Super Bowl XXIII.

Doug DuBose
No. 25
Position:Running backs
Personal information
Born:March 14, 1964 (age 55)
New London, Connecticut
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Montville High School
Oakdale, Connecticut
College:Nebraska
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

External links

1983 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1983 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska. Nicknamed "The Scoring Explosion", the team was noted for its prolific offense, which is still widely considered one of the greatest in college football history. The team and some of its individual players set several NCAA statistical records, some of which still stand. Nebraska scored a total of 654 points on the season.

1984 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1984 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1984 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1984 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1984 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1985 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1985 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1985 season included the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI).

1985 College Football All-America Team

The 1985 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1985. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1985 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Weekly, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all five official selectors. They are:

Bo Jackson, Auburn running back who rushed for 1,786 yards and won the 1985 Heisman Trophy;

Chuck Long, Iowa quarterback who won the 1985 Davey O'Brien Award and Maxwell Award and placed second in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Lorenzo White, Michigan State running back who became the first Big Ten Conference player to rush for over 2,000 yards and placed fourth in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma linebacker who won the 1985 Dick Butkus Award;

David Williams, Illinois wide receiver who caught 85 passes for 1,047 yards and finished his college career as the second leading receiver in NCAA history;

Larry Station, Iowa linebacker who led the team in tackles for the fourth straight season with 129;

John Lee, UCLA placekicker who set the NCAA record for highest percentage of extra points and field goals made in a career with 93.3% (116 of 117 PATs, 79 of 92 FGs);

Jim Dombrowski, Virginia offensive tackle;

Leslie O'Neal, Oklahoma defensive end; and

Tim Green, Syracuse defensive end.

1985 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1985 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska. The season opener against Florida State was the last season opening loss until 2015.

1985 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1985 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the college football season of 1985–1986. This year was Barry Switzer's 13th season as head coach. The Sooners ended this season with 11 wins and a sole loss coming to the Miami Hurricanes in Norman, in a game in which the Sooners lost starting quarterback Troy Aikman for the season. The Sooners were forced to place their trust in lightning-quick true freshman quarterback Jamelle Holieway and a physical defense featuring three All-Americans, who led them to a Big 8 Conference title and a national championship. This was Oklahoma's sixth national championship and 34th conference championship in school history.

1985 Sugar Bowl

The 1985 edition of the Sugar Bowl featured the fifth-ranked Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big Eight Conference and the eleventh-ranked LSU Tigers of the Southeastern Conference. It was played at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The teams had met two years earlier in the Orange Bowl.

1986 Fiesta Bowl

The 1986 Sunkist Fiesta Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1 at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona. It was the 15th edition of the Fiesta Bowl and matched the fifth-ranked Michigan Wolverines of the Big Ten Conference and the seventh-ranked Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big Eight Conference. Both teams were runners-up in their respective conferences.Behind by eleven points at halftime, Michigan took advantage of Nebraska turnovers, scored 24 points in the third quarter, and prevailed 27–23; running back Jamie Morris and defensive tackle Mark Messner, both Wolverines, were named the game's MVPs.

1986 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1986 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1988 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1988 San Francisco 49ers season was their 43rd season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their third Super Bowl victory. In 1988, the 49ers struggled. At one point, they were 6–5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Washington Redskins on a Monday night, eventually finishing the season at 10–6. They gained a measure of revenge by thrashing the Minnesota Vikings 34–9 in the first round. The 49ers then traveled to Chicago's Soldier Field, where the chill factor at gametime was 26 degrees below zero. They defeated the Chicago Bears 28–3 in the NFC Championship.

For the 49ers, it was their first Super Bowl appearance since they defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XIX. They had made the playoffs in the three seasons between Super Bowl XIX and Super Bowl XXIII, but were eliminated each time in the first round, primarily because of the poor performances by their offensive stars in those games; quarterback Joe Montana, receiver Jerry Rice and running back Roger Craig all failed to produce a single touchdown.

The 49ers alternated quarterbacks as Montana and Steve Young both started at various points of the season. The broadcast booth of the 49ers radio network also saw change, as Joe Starkey substituted for longtime 49ers play by play announcer Lon Simmons during several games, mostly in October when Simmons called the Oakland Athletics 1988 American League Championship Series and 1988 World Series games for the Oakland A's flagship station, KSFO–AM. The 1988 season was the last for Simmons as 49ers broadcaster. With the regular season and postseason, the 49ers compiled a total of 13 victories (a .684 win percentage) on the season, a record-low for Super Bowl champions. In 2011, the New York Giants would tie this record (but with a .650 win percentage as they suffered seven losses as opposed to the 49ers six).

1998 Music City Bowl

The 1998 Music City Bowl was a postseason college football game between the Virginia Tech Hokies and Alabama Crimson Tide. It was the inaugural competition of the annual Music City Bowl. Virginia Tech represented the Big East and the University of Alabama represented the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The game was the final competition for each team in the 1998 college football season. The game ended as a 38–7 victory for Virginia Tech.

Virginia Tech's 8–3 record during the 1998 college football regular season was good enough to earn it a bid to the inaugural Music City Bowl game. Facing the Hokies were the Alabama Crimson Tide, who had gone 7–4 during the regular season.

The 1998 Music City Bowl kicked off on December 29, 1998 in Nashville, Tennessee. The weather at kickoff was "horrid," as rain and sleet mixed in freezing temperatures. The game's early going was marked by defense as both teams struggled against the inclement weather. Virginia Tech scored first off a 43-yard touchdown scramble by quarterback Al Clark. Clark's touchdown provided the game's only points until the second quarter, when Alabama evened the score at 7–7 with a five-yard touchdown pass. The Hokies struck back with a field goal before halftime and took a tenuous 10–7 lead into the second half.

In that half, the Tech offense finally got rolling. The Hokies scored 14 points in both the third and fourth quarters, ending the game on an uncontested 28–0 run. Alabama's offense was stifled throughout by effective pressure from Tech defensive end Corey Moore, and Tech was able to turn several fumbles and interceptions by the Crimson Tide into points on the scoreboard. The final 38–7 Virginia Tech victory was the biggest win in Virginia Tech bowl game history, and Moore was named the game's most valuable player. The two teams did not meet again until the 2009 Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game on September 5, 2009.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

List of University of Nebraska–Lincoln people

This list of University of Nebraska–Lincoln people includes notable graduates, instructors, and administrators affiliated with University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Three Nobel Prize winners have been associated with the University.

List of suspensions in the National Football League

The following is a list of suspensions in the National Football League (NFL). Most NFL suspensions have been for players, but several coaches, owners, general managers, and game officials have also been suspended. After Roger Goodell became commissioner in 2006, the league began cracking down on players performing violent hits, as well as handing out more frequent suspensions for violating the league's personal conduct and substance abuse policies. Following the 2011 NFL season, Goodell handed down one of the most severe suspensions in league history when he suspended eight players and coaches for their involvement in the New Orleans Saints bounty scandal.

New London, Connecticut

New London is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States, located at the mouth of the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. It was one of the world's three busiest whaling ports for several decades beginning in the early 19th century, along with Nantucket and New Bedford, Massachusetts. The wealth that whaling brought into the city furnished the capital to fund much of the city's present architecture. The city subsequently became home to other shipping and manufacturing industries, but it has gradually lost most of its industrial heart.

New London is home to the United States Coast Guard Academy, Connecticut College, Mitchell College, and The Williams School. The Coast Guard Station New London and New London Harbor is home port to the Coast Guard Cutter Chinook and the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle. The city had a population of 27,620 at the 2010 census. The Norwich-New London metropolitan area includes 21 towns and 274,055 people.

Sacramento Surge

The Sacramento Surge was a professional American football team that played in the World League of American Football (WLAF) in 1991 and 1992. The team played its first season at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, and the second season in Hornet Stadium on the Sacramento State University campus. It was owned by Managing General Partner Fred Anderson and the General Manager was Michael F. Keller. In charge of Special Projects was Jack Youngblood, who also partnered with Joe Starkey and Ronnie Lott on the Surge radio broadcasts KRAK.

The team was coached by former Buffalo Bills quarterback–head coach Kay Stephenson. Charlie Sumner was the defensive coordinator and Jim Haslett was a defensive assistant coach.

The Surge won the World Bowl in 1992, the only American team to do so. On this championship team were future professional wrestler Bill Goldberg and investment guru Pete Najarian.

After the WLAF ended its American presence at the end of the 1992 season, Anderson continued Sacramento's presence in professional football by acquiring a Canadian Football League expansion franchise. The new team was named the Sacramento Gold Miners; Stephenson and several Surge players were retained in the change, as were the team colors of aqua and yellow.

Steve Taylor (Canadian football)

Steve Taylor (born January 7, 1967) was an American football quarterback who played in the Canadian Football League. Taylor had signed a four-year contract with the Edmonton Eskimos just one month after finishing his senior season at the University of Nebraska. The dual-threat QB was selected in the twelfth round of the 1989 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts in April, but Taylor was already committed to playing in the CFL.Starting in the summer of 1989, Taylor played for four CFL teams: the Eskimos, Calgary Stampeders, Hamilton Tiger-Cats, and Ottawa Rough Riders. He spent his entire career of eight seasons as a backup, playing behind notable CFL starters such as Tracy Ham and Doug Flutie. Taylor's career passing statistics included 4,947 yards passing with 35 touchdowns and 26 interceptions. He completed 366-of-652 pass attempts during his CFL career.

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