Doug Drabek

Douglas Dean Drabek (born July 25, 1962) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher and current Pitching Coach for the Jackson Generals. He played for the New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates, Houston Astros, Chicago White Sox and Baltimore Orioles between 1986 and 1998. Drabek batted and threw right-handed. He is the pitching coach for the Double A Jackson Generals. Known for his fluid pitching motion and sound mechanics, he won the National League Cy Young Award in 1990.[1]

Doug Drabek
Kyle Drabek with his father Doug
Doug Drabek (right) with his son, Kyle, in 2012
Pitcher
Born: July 25, 1962 (age 56)
Victoria, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 30, 1986, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 25, 1998, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
Win–loss record155–134
Earned run average3.73
Strikeouts1,594
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Drabek was born in Victoria, Texas.[2] He attended St. Joseph High School in Victoria, where he played football[3] and baseball. Drabek was drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the 4th round of the June 1980 MLB Draft, but did not sign. He then attended the University of Houston and played three seasons for the Cougars baseball team.[1] Following his junior year, Drabek was drafted by the Chicago White Sox in the 11th round of the June 1983 MLB Draft and signed on June 11.[4]

Career

After signing with the White Sox, Drabek was assigned to the Niagara Falls Sox in the short-season New York-Penn League where he finished 6–7 with a 3.67 ERA in 16 games with 103 strikeouts in 103 2/3 innings. After pitching one game for the Class A Appleton, Drabek was promoted to the AA Glens Falls White Sox and was 12–5 with a 2.24 ERA. On 13 August, he was traded to the New York Yankees along with Kevin Hickey to complete an earlier deal made on July 18 for Roy Smalley.[5] Drabek then spent the rest of the 1984 season at AA Nashville. In 1985, Drabek returned to AA and spent the entire season at Albany-Colonie in the Eastern League and finished with a 13–7 record with a 2.99 ERA with 153 strikeouts in 192 2/3 innings. After starting the 1986 season at AAA Columbus, Drabek made his Major League debut on May 30, coming in relief for starter Joe Niekro in a 6–3 loss to the Oakland Athletics.[6] He would spend the rest of the season with the Yankees, appearing in 27 games (21 starts) and go 7–8 with a 4.10 ERA. Following the season, he was traded with Logan Easley and Brian Fisher to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Rick Rhoden, Cecilio Guante and Pat Clements.

Drabek enjoyed his best years with Pittsburgh, from 1987 to 1992, during which time he regularly pitched over 230 innings and consistently finished in the top 10 in the National League ERA race. He went 22–6 with a 2.76 ERA in 1990 en route to winning the National League Cy Young Award[7] and leading the Pirates to the postseason (where they lost in the NLCS to the Cincinnati Reds). His 22 wins that year were a league high; it was also 7 more wins than his previous single-season mark. On August 3, 1990, while with the Pirates, Drabek had a no-hitter broken up by a Sil Campusano single with two out in the ninth. The hit was the only one Drabek would allow in defeating the Philadelphia Phillies 11-0.[8]

Drabek signed as a free agent after the 1992 season with the Houston Astros. Despite a solid 3.79 ERA and playing for a rising team, he posted a 9–18 record. He improved in the strike-shortened 1994 season to 12–6 with a 2.84 ERA, and was named an All-Star for the first and only time in his career.

When play resumed after the players' strike in 1995, however, he was unable to maintain his success and retired after the 1998 season, having compiled a 35–40 record over his final four seasons.

Retirement and personal life

After retiring, Drabek coached his son's Little League and select league teams, often teaching them how to bat at a faster pitch, with their personal pitching machine so as to gain an advantage over the other little league teams.[9] Drabek returned to professional baseball in 2010, accepting a position in the Arizona Diamondbacks system as the pitching coach for the Yakima Bears in the short-season Class A Northwest League. On 13 December 2010 the D-backs announced that Drabek was promoted to the pitching coach for the Visalia Rawhide in the Class A California League.[10]

Drabek is married to wife Kristy and has three children; sons Justin (born 1986) and Kyle (born 1987) and daughter Kelsey (born 1991). Justin spent time playing in independent ball.[9] Kyle is a starting pitcher and is currently in the Arizona Diamondbacks organization, after previously playing for the Chicago White Sox and Toronto Blue Jays.

In February 2018, Drabek was named as the Pitching coach for the AA Jackson Generals.

References

  1. ^ a b Meyer, Paul (June 6, 2006). "Like father..." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. D3. Retrieved April 1, 2010.
  2. ^ "Doug Drabek Stats". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2012.
  3. ^ Utterback, Bill (7 October 1990). "Few present Pirates remember 1979 playoffs". Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh Press. pp. D3. Retrieved April 1, 2010.
  4. ^ "Doug Drabek Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on July 23, 2013. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  5. ^ "Doug Drabek Minor League Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. July 25, 1962. Archived from the original on September 18, 2013. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  6. ^ "New York Yankees at Oakland Athletics Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. May 30, 1986. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  7. ^ Frank Carroll (March 27, 1993). "Mets Shell Drabek - Astros Not Worried". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on June 1, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  8. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Pittsburgh Pirates 11, Philadelphia Phillies 0". Retrosheet.org. August 3, 1990. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  9. ^ a b Piecoro, Nick (February 3, 2010). "Whats up with minor league pitching coach Doug Drabek". Azcentral.com. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  10. ^ Arizona Diamondbacks (December 13, 2010). "D-backs announce Minor League coaching staffs". MLB.com. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved August 20, 2012.

External links

1984 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1984 season was the 82nd season for the Yankees. The team finished in third place in the American League Eastern Division with a record of 87-75, finishing 17 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Yogi Berra. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1990 National League Championship Series

The 1990 National League Championship Series was played between the Cincinnati Reds (91–71) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (95–67). It was the first playoff appearance for both teams since 1979 and the fifth NLCS meeting overall with Cincinnati winning the Pennant in 1970, 1972, and 1975 while Pittsburgh won in 1979.

The Reds won the series, 4–2, and eventually went on to sweep the defending World Champion Oakland Athletics in the World Series. This was the only NLCS during the 1990s that did not feature the Atlanta Braves and was the first of four straight to feature either the Philadelphia Phillies or the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Between Game 2 (in Cincinnati) and Game 3 (in Pittsburgh), the teams took two days off instead of the usual one. That Sunday, October 7, the Pittsburgh Steelers needed to use Three Rivers Stadium for their scheduled game against the San Diego Chargers, so Game 3 (and by extension, the rest of the series) was pushed back a day.

1990 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1990 season was their 23rd in Oakland, California. It was also the 90th season in franchise history. The team finished first in the American League West with a record of 103-59.

The Athletics' 1990 campaign ranks among the organization's finest. Oakland, in winning 103 games, led the league outright in wins for a third consecutive season; they remained the last major North American team to accomplish this until 2017, when the feat was matched by the nearby Golden State Warriors of the NBA. The Athletics benefited from stellar performances in all areas of the game. The team's offense was led by eventual Hall-of-Famer Rickey Henderson. Henderson finished the season with 65 stolen bases, 28 home runs, and a .325 batting average; for his efforts, he took home the 1990 American League MVP Award. The Athletics also benefited from strong performances by superstars Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco. The pair clubbed 39 and 37 home runs, respectively; in doing so, they drove in a combined total of 209 runs. Over the course of the season, the team added to an already strong offense; the additions of recent All-Stars Willie Randolph, Willie McGee, and Harold Baines further widened the gap between the Athletics and the rest of the league. Established veterans (such as Carney Lansford, Terry Steinbach, Dave Henderson, and Mike Gallego) and promising young players (mainly Walt Weiss and Mike Bordick) rounded out arguably the deepest roster in all of Major League Baseball. Eight of the Athletics' nine main postseason starters (R. Henderson, McGwire, Canseco, McGee, Steinbach, Randolph, Baines, and Lansford) played in at least one All-Star Game between 1988 and 1990.

The Athletics pitching staff, in many regards, had an even stronger campaign. The starting rotation was led by veteran Bob Welch. Welch would finish the season with both an MLB-leading 27 wins and a 2.95 ERA; this performance was strong enough to net the 1990 Cy Young Award. Welch, as of 2014, remains the last MLB pitcher to win at least 25 games in a season. Fellow starter Dave Stewart, winner of 22 games, finished in a tie (with Pittsburgh starter Doug Drabek) for the second-most wins in MLB. 1989 All-Star Mike Moore, 1991 All-Star Scott Sanderson, and longtime Athletic Curt Young rounded out the American League's top rotation. The Athletics' bullpen was led by superstar closer Dennis Eckersley, who posted a microscopic 0.61 ERA while recording 48 saves. As a team, the Athletics allowed only 570 runs (the fewest in the American League by a wide margin).

The Athletics easily won the American League West for a third consecutive season. They swept the Boston Red Sox, four games to none, in that year's American League Championship Series; in doing so, they won a third consecutive American League pennant. The Athletics entered the 1990 World Series as heavy favorites. Despite this, however, they were themselves swept by the Cincinnati Reds. The Athletics have not reached the World Series since.

1990 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1990 Pittsburgh Pirates season was their 109th season; the 104th in the National League. This was their 21st season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished first in the National League East with a record of 95–67. They were defeated four games to two by the Cincinnati Reds in the 1990 National League Championship Series.

1991 National League Championship Series

The 1991 National League Championship Series was played between the Atlanta Braves (94–68) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (98–64), with the Braves coming out on top in the Series 4–3. It was considered one of the best-pitched seven-game series of the modern era, featuring three 1–0 finishes and four shutouts. The Braves went on to lose in the World Series to the Minnesota Twins in seven games.

The Pirates had the best record in the National League in 1991, and were the first NL East team to win consecutive division championships since the Philadelphia Phillies, their in-state rivals, during their run of three straight NL East championships, from 1976–1978 (in fact, the Pirates won the 1991 NL East title in a game against their rivals). and were expected to win this Series and advance to the World Series. However, the Braves, who went from last place in the National League West in 1990 to first place in the division in 1991, were able to pull off the upset in their memorable run to the World Series versus the Minnesota Twins.

1992 National League Championship Series

The 1992 National League Championship Series was played between the Atlanta Braves (98–64) and the Pittsburgh Pirates (96–66) from October 6 to 14. A rematch of the 1991 NLCS, Atlanta won the 1992 NLCS in seven games to advance to their second straight World Series. The series ended in dramatic fashion; in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7, with Atlanta down 2–1 and the bases loaded, the Braves' Francisco Cabrera cracked a two-run single that scored David Justice and Sid Bream. Bream famously slid to score the Series-winning run, beating the throw by Pirates left fielder Barry Bonds.

The Braves would go on to lose to the Toronto Blue Jays in the World Series in six games.

1992 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1992 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished sixth in the National League East with a record of 70 wins and 92 losses.

1992 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1992 Pittsburgh Pirates season was their 111th season; the 106th in the National League. This was their 23rd season at Three Rivers Stadium. For the third consecutive season, the Pirates won the National League East Division Title with a record of 96–66. They were defeated four games to three by the Atlanta Braves in the 1992 National League Championship Series. The Pirates would not have another winning season until 2013.

1993 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1993 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

1994 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1994 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the inaugural season of the National League Central division; they finished in second place. First baseman Jeff Bagwell was a unanimous selection for the National League Most Valuable Player Award. Despite nearly the last two months of the being cancelled due to the 1994–95 strike, Bagwell set a then-club record for home runs with 39 and a club record for batting average (.368) and slugging percentage (.750).

1997 Chicago White Sox season

The 1997 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 98th season. They finished with a record 80-81, good enough for 2nd place in the American League Central, 6 games behind the 1st place Cleveland Indians.

1998 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1998 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 79 wins and 83 losses.

Houston Astros award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Houston Astros professional baseball team.

Kyle Drabek

Kyle Jordan Drabek (born December 8, 1987) is an American professional baseball pitcher who is a free agent. He previously played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Toronto Blue Jays, Chicago White Sox, and Arizona Diamondbacks.

Drabek is the son of former major-league pitcher and 1990 National League Cy Young Award winner Doug Drabek. He wore a single-digit uniform number (4), a rarity among pitchers, while with the Blue Jays.

List of Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers

The Pittsburgh Pirates are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They play in the National League Central division. Originally known as the Alleghenys, they played in the American Association from 1882 through 1886, and have played in the National League since 1887. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Pirates have used 71 Opening Day starting pitchers since they began to play as a Major League team in 1882. The Pirates have a record of 69 wins and 60 losses in their Opening Day games.The Pirates have played in several different home ball parks. Between 1882 and 1909 they played in two parks called Exposition Park and in Recreation Park. They played in Forbes Field from 1909 to 1970 and Three Rivers Stadium from 1970 to 2000 and they have played in their current stadium, PNC Park, since 2001. They had a record of no wins and one loss in the first Exposition Park, four wins and no losses in Recreation Park and no wins and two losses in the second Exposition Park. They had a record of four wins and two losses at Forbes Field and a record of five wins and eight losses at Three Rivers Stadium. Through 2010, they have a record of two wins and one loss at PNC Park. That gives the Pirates an overall Opening Day record of 15 wins and 14 losses at home. They have a record of 54 wins and 46 losses in Opening Day games on the road.Bob Friend has made the most Opening Day starts for the Pirates, with seven. Babe Adams and Frank Killen each made five Opening Day starts for the Pirates, and Deacon Phillippe, Howie Camnitz, Cy Blanton and Bob Veale each made four Opening Day starts. Ed Morris, Pud Galvin, Wilbur Cooper, Ray Kremer, Rip Sewell, Steve Blass, Dock Ellis, Rick Rhoden, Doug Drabek and Francisco Liriano all made three Opening Day starts for the Pirates. Several Pittsburgh Pirates Opening Day starting pitchers have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, including Galvin, Burleigh Grimes, Waite Hoyt, Jim Bunning, and Bert Blyleven. Bunning was elected as both a United States congressman and senator from Kentucky after retiring from baseball.The Pirates have won nine National League titles, in 1901, 1902, 1903, 1909, 1925, 1927, 1960, 1971 and 1979. They went on to win the World Series in 1909, 1925, 1960, 1971 and 1979 (the modern World Series begin in 1903). Sam Leever was the Pirates Opening Day starting pitcher in 1901, Phillippe was the Opening Day starting pitcher in both 1902 and 1903, Camnitz was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1909, Emil Yde in 1925, Kremer in 1927, Friend in 1960, Ellis in 1971 and Blyleven in 1979.

Major League Baseball Pitcher of the Month Award

The Pitcher of the Month award is a Major League Baseball award named by each league for each month of the regular season. The National League started recognizing the award in 1975. The American League followed in 1979. Upon the introduction of each league's award, pitchers became ineligible for the (position players') player of the month award.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.