Doug Dieken

Douglas Heye Dieken (born February 12, 1949) is the radio color analyst for gameday broadcasts of the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL). As an offensive tackle, he played 14 seasons with the Browns.

Doug Dieken
refer to caption
Dieken in 2013
No. 73
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:February 12, 1949 (age 70)
Streator, Illinois
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:254 lb (115 kg)
Career information
High school:Streator (IL) Township
College:Illinois
NFL Draft:1971 / Round: 6 / Pick: 142
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Fumble recoveries:13
Safeties:1
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

Playing career

In college, Doug was a tight end on an Illinois team that hardly passed at all, and so he was not taken until the sixth round of the 1971 draft.[1] His first game in a Browns uniform was an exhibition game against the Chicago Bears that happened to be the game used as a backdrop for the movie Brian's Song which was released in November 1971. After improving rapidly during his first year with the Browns, the coaches seemed to think he could take over for left tackle Dick Schafrath. He did, and became only the third left tackle in the team's history.

Excellent at both run and pass blocking, Dieken proved to be an outstanding player and an iron man. He not only went to the Pro Bowl, but he set team records with 194 straight starts and 203 consecutive games played.[2] Doug also proved to be a fine citizen, winning the NFL Man of the Year Award following the 1982 season, and adding his name and efforts to a number of worthy Cleveland area charities.[2]

Broadcasting career

Following his retirement after the 1984 season, Dieken became a color commentator on Browns radio broadcasts, a job he holds to this day. He also appears on Browns themed programming on SportsTime Ohio as an analyst.

Combining his playing and broadcasting career, he has been a part of the Browns organization for over 45 years (having played from 1971 to 1984, a radio/TV broadcaster from 1985 to 1995 and 1999 to present, and a spokesman/ambassador for the Cleveland Browns Trust during the team's "inactive" period from 1996 to 1998).[3]

Awards and honors

References

  1. ^ a b Dieken stats - Database Football.com Archived 2013-12-15 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b Dieken bio - Cleveland Browns.com
  3. ^ a b c Dieken wins NFL Man of the Year award - Cleveland.com
  4. ^ Dieken wins Humanitarian Award - Cleveland Touchdown Club.org
  5. ^ Dieken inducted into Cleveland Sports HOF - Cleveland Sports Hall.com
  6. ^ Dieken inducted into Ohio Broadcasters HOF - Broadcasters Hall of Fame.com Archived 2014-02-21 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Dieken HOF bio - Broadcasters Hall of Fame.com Archived 2014-02-21 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Browns Legends - Cleveland Browns.com

External links

1968 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1968 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1968 Big Ten Conference football season. In their second year under head coach Jim Valek, the Illini compiled a 1–9 record and finished in a tie for eighth place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Bob Naponic with 813 passing yards, running back Rich Johnson with 973 rushing yards, and wide receiver Doug Dieken with 223 receiving yards. Fullback Rich Johnson was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1969 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1969 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1969 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third year under head coach Jim Valek, the Illini compiled a 0–10 record and finished in last place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Steve Livas with 705 passing yards, running back Dave Jackson with 465 rushing yards, and wide receiver Doug Dieken with 486 receiving yards. Dieken was selected as the team's most valuable player.Guard Doug Redmann was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association as a second-team player on the 1969 College Football All-America Team.

1970 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1970 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1970 Big Ten Conference football season. The teams selected by the Big Ten coaches for the United Press International (UPI) were dominated by the 1970 Michigan Wolverines football team with 10 first-team selections and the 1970 Ohio State Buckeyes football team with six first-team selections.

1970 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1970 Big Ten Conference football season was the 75th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1970 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1970 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, won the Big Ten football championship, was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll, and led the conference in scoring offense (29.0 points per game). The Buckeyes were undefeated in the regular season but lost to Stanford in the 1971 Rose Bowl. Defensive back Jack Tatum and middle guard Jim Stillwagon were consensus first-team All-Americans. Stillwagon also won the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in college football. Running back John Brockington led the conference with 102 points scored, received first-team All-American honors from multiple selectors, and was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1971 NFL Draft with the ninth overall pick. Quarterback Rex Kern finished fifth in the voting for the 1970 Heisman Trophy.

The 1970 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll and led the conference in scoring defense (9.0 points per game). Michigan's only loss was to Ohio State. Offensive tackle Dan Dierdorf was a consensus first-team All-American. Quarterback Don Moorhead and middle guard Henry Hill were selected as the team's most valuable players.

The 1970 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Alex Agase, tied with Michigan for second place in the Big Ten and was ranked Running back Mike Adamle of Northwestern led the conference with 1,255 rushing yards and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the conference's most valuable player.

1970 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1970 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1970 Big Ten Conference football season. In their fourth and final year under head coach Jim Valek, the Illini compiled a 3–7 record and finished in a tie for last place in the Big Ten Conference.The team's offensive leaders were quarterback Mike Wells with 906 passing yards, running back Darrell Robinson with 749 rushing yards, and wide receiver Doug Dieken with 537 receiving yards. Dieken was selected for the second consecutive year as the team's most valuable player.

1977 Cleveland Browns season

The 1977 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 28th season with the National Football League. After a 6-4 start, the Browns lost their final four games of the season, to finish with a disappointing 6-8 record. With one game left in the season, head coach Forrest Gregg was fired and replaced by Dick Modzelewski.

1979 Cleveland Browns season

The 1979 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 30th season with the National Football League.

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

1983 Cleveland Browns season

The 1983 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 34th season with the National Football League.

1984 Cleveland Browns season

The 1984 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 35th season with the National Football League. At the season's mid-way point, head coach Sam Rutigliano was fired after starting 1–7. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Marty Schottenheimer, who went 4–4 to finish the season. (Schottenheimer would coach the Browns until 1988, guiding the Browns to a .620 winning percentage in his tenure with the team.)

Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award

The Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award has been awarded by the National Football League Players Association continuously since 1967. The most recent winner, for the 2017 season, is Chris Long of the Philadelphia Eagles. The award honors work in the community as the NFL player who best served his team, community and country in the spirit of Byron "Whizzer" White, who was a Supreme Court justice, professional American football player, naval officer, and humanitarian. Past winners have included Drew Brees, Warrick Dunn, Gale Sayers, Bart Starr, Archie Manning, Peyton Manning, Troy Vincent, and Ken Houston. Prior to his ascension to the Supreme Court, White had been All-Pro three times (1938, 1940, 1941) and the NFL rushing champion twice (1938 and 1940).

The 2001 recipient, Michael McCrary, was the child in the Supreme Court case Runyon v. McCrary (1976) in which Justice White had participated nearly a quarter of a century before McCrary's award. White had dissented from the position taken by the lawyers for McCrary.

Cleveland Browns Radio Network

The Cleveland Browns Radio Network is an American radio network composed of 22 radio stations which carry English-language coverage of the Cleveland Browns, a professional football team in the National Football League (NFL). Cleveland market stations WKNR (850 AM), WKRK-FM (92.3 FM), and WNCX (98.5 FM) serve as the network's three flagships. The network also includes 19 affiliates in the U.S. states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Oklahoma: 10 AM stations, five of which supplement their signals with a low-power FM translator; and 9 full-power FM stations, one of which supplements its signal with a low-power FM translator. Jim Donovan is the current play-by-play announcer, while Doug Dieken serves as color commentator. In addition to traditional over-the-air AM and FM broadcasts, network programming airs on SiriusXM satellite radio; and streams online via SiriusXM Internet Radio, TuneIn Premium, and NFL Game Pass.

List of Cleveland Browns Pro Bowl selections

This is a list of Cleveland Browns players who were elected to the Pro Bowl.

The year indicates when the game was played, not the season that it followed.

List of Cleveland Browns broadcasters

As of 2013, The Browns flagship radio stations are WKNR AM 850, WKRK-FM 92.3, and WNCX FM 98.5. Games are covered on-site by play-by-play announcer Jim Donovan and color commentator Doug Dieken, a former Browns offensive tackle.WEWS channel 5 is the preseason TV home of the Browns, with former ESPN sportscaster Jay Crawford (play by play), 1999 #1 overall draft pick Tim Couch (color commentary), and (now former) WEWS sports director/WKRK midday host Andy Baskin (pregame/halftime host; sideline reporter) comprising the broadcast team.

List of most consecutive starts and games played by National Football League players

This is a list of the most consecutive starts and games played by a player by position in the NFL.Brett Favre's starts streak of 297 games is the longest all-time. Among defensive players, Jim Marshall's starts streak of 270 is the longest all-time. Of special note is punter Jeff Feagles, who played in 352 consecutive games which is the longest of all-time for a special teams player. Special teams players are not credited with starts in the NFL. In 2018, Ryan Kerrigan became the most recent player to surpass someone at his position for consecutive starts, having broken the previous mark for left outside linebackers previously held by Jason Gildon.Updated through 2018 season

Bold denotes an active streak

Nick Skorich

Nicholas Leonard Skorich (June 26, 1921 – October 2, 2004) was an American football player and coach.

Skorich played guard at Bellaire High School and the University of Cincinnati before joining the United States Navy in 1943. After the end of World War II, he signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers, who had taken him in the 1943 NFL Draft. He played three years for the Steelers.

Skorich then went into coaching, first at the high school level, then as an assistant with the Steelers from 1954 to 1957. After one year with the Green Bay Packers, he moved to the Philadelphia Eagles, who promoted him to head coach after Buck Shaw retired following the Eagles' 1960 championship season.

The Eagles remained competitive in 1961, winning 10 of 14 games, but fell to 3–10–1 in 1962 and 2–10–2 in 1963. Fired from the Eagles, Skorich took a job as a defensive assistant under Cleveland Browns coach Blanton Collier in 1964. The Browns promoted him to offensive coordinator four years later and head coach upon Collier's retirement after the 1970 season.

In 1970, the Browns had gone 7–7 in only their second non-winning season since beginning play in 1946. Under Skorich, the Browns went 9–5 in 1971, winning the AFC Central Division before losing to the Baltimore Colts in the divisional playoffs. The following year, the Browns earned a wild card spot with a 10–4 record. In the playoffs, they came as close as anyone else that season did to beating the Miami Dolphins in that team's perfect season, losing 20–14 on a late Jim Kiick touchdown.

But by then Browns greats like Leroy Kelly, Gary Collins and Gene Hickerson had retired or were winding down their careers, and quarterback Mike Phipps was proving to be a disappointment. Cleveland dropped to 7–5–2 in 1973 and, in its first last-place finish ever, 4–10 in 1974. The Browns replaced Skorich with former Green Bay Packers star Forrest Gregg. Several players drafted under Skorich, including Brian Sipe, Doug Dieken and Greg Pruitt would play well for Gregg and his successor, Sam Rutigliano.

After leaving Cleveland, Skorich served as supervisor of officials for the National Football League. He is credited with developing mechanics for umpires, the most demanding position on an officiating crew since the umpire is positioned behind the defensive line and is often caught in the middle of heavy traffic during play. The mechanics for umpires was changed by the NFL for the 2010 season, moving the umpire behind the quarterback, parallel to the referee, except for the last two minutes of each half.

He died in 2004, after complications from heart surgery. In his memory his family started the Nicholas L. Skorich scholarship fund, which, holds a yearly golf outing.

Robert Jackson (guard)

Robert Edward Jackson (born April 1, 1953) is a former American football guard who played eleven professional seasons with the National Football League's Cleveland Browns. Jackson attended Duke University where he arrived as a quarterback (a position he played at North Mecklenburg High School) with his twin brother Ken, a tight end. Robert filled out over his time at Duke, eventually landing on the offensive line. From a humble start as a free agent, Robert was honored as a Cleveland Browns Legend in September 2014.Robert started working in the insurance business in the offseason during his playing career. He and Doug Dieken eventually formed Jackson Dieken and Associates in Westlake, Ohio, where Robert serves as principal.

SportsTime Ohio

SportsTime Ohio (STO) (also sometimes referred to on-air as Fox SportsTime Ohio) is an American regional sports network that is owned by Fox Cable Networks, a unit of the Fox Entertainment Group division of 21st Century Fox, and operates as an affiliate of Fox Sports Networks. The channel, which is a sister network to Fox Sports Ohio, broadcasts statewide coverage of professional, collegiate and high school sports events throughout northern Ohio, including the Cleveland area.

SportsTime Ohio is available from most cable providers in Northeast Ohio and select providers in other portions of Ohio (including Columbus), Northwest Pennsylvania, and extreme Western New York. It is also available nationwide on satellite via DirecTV, as well as outside Ohio on AT&T U-verse.

Streator Township High School

Streator Township High School, also known as Streator High School is often abbreviated SHS, is a high school located in Streator, Illinois at 202 West Lincoln Avenue.

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