Doug DeCinces

Douglas Vernon DeCinces (/dəˈsɪn.seɪ/ də-SIN-say; born August 29, 1950) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman, who played for the Baltimore Orioles, California Angels and St. Louis Cardinals over the course of a 15-year career.

Doug DeCinces
Doug DeCinces 1986
DeCinces in 1986
Third baseman
Born: August 29, 1950 (age 68)
Burbank, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 1973, for the Baltimore Orioles
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 1987, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.259
Home runs237
Runs batted in879
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

DeCinces played PONY League Baseball and Colt League Baseball in Northridge, California, with fellow major leaguer Dwight Evans. He attended and played for Los Angeles Pierce College, and is in their Athletic Hall of Fame.

He began his major league career with the Baltimore Orioles late in the 1973 season, and he played for the Orioles in the ensuing eight full seasons. On June 22, 1979, in one of the most famous games in Orioles history, he hit a game-winning home run at Memorial Stadium off Detroit Tigers reliever Dave Tobik. The Orioles were trailing the Tigers 5-3 going into the bottom of the ninth inning. With one out, Ken Singleton hit a solo home run off Tobik to bring the Orioles within one. Eddie Murray reached base on a single, and, with two outs, DeCinces hit a two-run home run to give the Orioles a 6-5 victory.[1] The win has been called "the night Oriole Magic was born."[2] DeCinces said years later that the game and his home run "triggered something" and that "the emotion just multiplied from there," adding that the ensuing atmosphere of excitement was in no small part due to the excited call of the home run by announcers Bill O'Donnell and Charley Eckman on the Orioles' radio network.[3][4] The Orioles went on to win the American League pennant in 1979.

In 1982 the Orioles traded DeCinces to the California Angels for Dan Ford in order to make room for Cal Ripken, Jr. (DeCinces had begun his career in Baltimore as the successor to Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson.) DeCinces was a member of the American League All Star Team in 1983. Released by the Angels on September 23, 1987, he concluded his major league career by playing in four games for the St. Louis Cardinals late in the 1987 season. In total, DeCinces played for fifteen seasons (1973–1987) in the major leagues for three different teams, including nine years with the Orioles and six years with the Angels.

Also in 1982, DeCinces hit 3 home runs in a game twice within a 5 day span as a member of the California Angels, on August 3 in a 5-4 loss to the Minnesota Twins and on August 8 in a 9-5 victory over the Seattle Mariners.

In 1988 DeCinces played for the Yakult Swallows in Japan. He missed the final two months of the season because of back problems and, on his doctors' advice, retired from baseball after the end of the season.[5] His experiences in Japan led to him being hired as a consultant for the 1992 film Mr. Baseball, about a veteran American ballplayer who is traded to a Japanese baseball club and is forced to contend with overwhelming expectations and cultural differences during the team's run at the pennant.

DeCinces twice finished in the top 25 voting for the American League Most Valuable Player, finishing third in 1982 and 11th in 1986 while playing for the California Angels. In 1982 he also won the Silver Slugger Award.[6]

He was inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame on August 26, 2006.

Insider trading trial

On August 4, 2011, DeCinces, along with three others, was charged by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) with insider trading ahead of a company buyout. In a civil suit, the SEC alleged that DeCinces and his associates made more than $1.7 million in illegal profits when Abbott Park, Ill.-based Abbott Laboratories Inc. announced its plan to purchase Advanced Medical Optics Inc. through a tender offer.[7] Without admitting or denying the allegations, DeCinces agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle the SEC's charges.[8]

In November 2012, DeCinces received a criminal indictment on insider trading related to the same incident and was charged with securities fraud and money laundering.[9] On May 12, 2017, after a nearly two-month trial, a federal court jury in Santa Ana, California found him guilty on all 13 charges.[10]

Each of the 17 felony convictions carries a maximum prison sentence of 20 years,[11] though, as of April 2019, DeCinces is yet to be sentenced as other cases relating to the trial are still in progress.[12]

Career statistics

Years Games PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG FLD%
15 1649 6534 5809 778 1505 312 29 237 879 618 904 .259 .329 .445 .959

In postseason play, in 23 games, in 3 ALCS and 1 World Series, he batted .270 (24-for-89) with 13 runs, 2 home runs and 9 RBI.

See also

Further reading

References

  1. ^ Baseball Reference Box Score. Retrieved on April 18, 2012.
  2. ^ John Eisenberg, From 33rd Street to Camden Yards: An Oral History of the Baltimore Orioles, pages 335-36 (2001). Retrieved on April 18, 2012.
  3. ^ Id. at 336.
  4. ^ Audio of the Orioles' radio network broadcast of Doug DeCinces's game-winning home run on June 22, 1979 on YouTube. Retrieved on May 11, 2013.
  5. ^ Mike Penner, Latest Bout with Back Problems Forces DeCinces' Retirement from Baseball, Los Angeles Times (November 2, 1988). Retrieved on April 30, 2013.
  6. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/d/decindo01.shtml
  7. ^ "SEC Charges Former Professional Baseball Player Doug DeCinces and Three Others with Insider Trading". Securities and Exchange Commission. Archived from the original on 6 August 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
  8. ^ Id. See also Stuart Pfeifer, Ex-Angels player Doug DeCinces settles insider trading lawsuit, Los Angeles Times (August 5, 2011). Retrieved on April 18, 2012.
  9. ^ "Former MLB All-Star Doug DeCinces indicted for insider trading". USA Today. November 28, 2012.
  10. ^ Hannah Fry, Former Angels player Doug DeCinces found guilty of insider trading, Los Angeles Times (May 12, 2017). Retrieved on May 13, 2017.
  11. ^ http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2017/05/13/former-oriole-doug-decinces-convicted-for-insider-trading/
  12. ^ Judge dismisses criminal case against man convicted of insider trading alongside ex-Angel star Doug DeCinces

External links

1969 Major League Baseball draft

The 1969 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1969 MLB season. The draft featured future Hall of Famers Bert Blyleven (pick 55) and Dave Winfield (pick 882).

1973 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1973 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They went on to lose to the Oakland Athletics in the 1973 American League Championship Series, three games to two.

1974 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1974 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League East with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. The Orioles went on to lose to the Oakland Athletics in the 1974 American League Championship Series, 3 games to 1.

1975 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1975 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 90 wins and 69 losses.

1976 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1976 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing second in the American League East with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses.

1977 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1977 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing second in the American League East with a record of 97 wins and 64 losses.

1978 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1978 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing fourth in the American League East with a record of 90 wins and 71 losses.

1979 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1979 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. The Orioles finished first in the American League East division of Major League Baseball with a record of 102 wins and 57 losses. They went on to defeat the California Angels in the 1979 American League Championship Series, 3 games to 1, before losing in the 1979 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4 games to 3.

1979 World Series

The 1979 World Series was the 76th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1979 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it was played between the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates (98–64) and the American League (AL) champion Baltimore Orioles (102–57), with the Pirates becoming the fourth team in World Series history to come back from a three games to one deficit to win the Series in seven games. This marked the second time in the 1970s the Pirates won a World Series Game 7 on the road against Baltimore Orioles, the previous time being in the 1971 World Series. The Pirates were famous for adopting Sister Sledge's hit anthem "We Are Family" as their theme song.

Willie Stargell, pitcher Bruce Kison, and catcher Manny Sanguillén were the only players left over from the Pirates team that defeated the Orioles in the 1971 World Series, and Orioles' pitcher Jim Palmer, shortstop Mark Belanger, and manager Earl Weaver were the only remaining Orioles from the 1971 team. Grant Jackson pitched for the Orioles in the 1971 series and for the Pirates in the 1979 series.

In this Series, it was the American League team's "turn" to play by National League rules, meaning no designated hitter and the Orioles' pitchers would have to bat. While this resulted in Tim Stoddard getting his first major league hit and RBI in Game 4, overall, it hurt the Orioles because Lee May, their designated hitter for much of the season and a key part of their offense, was only able to bat three times in the whole series.

Willie Stargell, the series MVP, hit .400 with a record seven extra-base hits and matched Reggie Jackson's record of 25 total bases, set in 1977.

The 1979 Pirates were the last team to win Game 7 of a World Series on the road until the San Francisco Giants defeated the Royals in Kansas City to win Game 7 of the 2014 Series. They were also the last road team to win Game 7 of a championship round, in any major league sport, until the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings 2–1 at Joe Louis Arena to win the 2009 Stanley Cup Finals. With the Steelers having already won Super Bowl XIII, Pittsburgh also became the second city to win both the Super Bowl and the World Series in the same year, with the New York Jets and the New York Mets winning titles in 1969. New York repeated the feat in 1986 (New York Mets and New York Giants), as did the New England area in the 2004 season (Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots) and the 2018 season (Red Sox and Patriots).

1980 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1980 Baltimore Orioles season was the club's 26th season in Baltimore. It involved the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 100 wins and 62 losses.

1981 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1981 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 59 wins and 46 losses. The season was suspended for 50 days due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike. The Orioles hit five grand slams, the most in MLB in 1981.

1982 California Angels season

The California Angels 1982 season involved the Angels finishing 1st in the American League west with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses.

1985 California Angels season

The California Angels 1985 season involved the Angels taking 2nd place in the American League West with a 90-72 record, finishing one game behind the eventual World Series champions, the Kansas City Royals.

1986 American League Championship Series

The 1986 American League Championship Series was a back-and-forth battle between the Boston Red Sox and the California Angels for the right to advance to the 1986 World Series to face the winner of the 1986 National League Championship Series. The Red Sox came in with a 95–66 record and the AL East division title, while the Angels went 92–70 during the regular season to win the AL West.

1987 California Angels season

The California Angels 1987 season involved the Angels finishing 6th in the American League west with a record of 75 wins and 87 losses.

1987 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1987 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 106th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 96th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95-67 during the season and finished first in the National League East Division for the third and last time before moving to the NL Central in 1994. They went on to win the NLCS in seven games over the San Francisco Giants. In the World Series against the Minnesota Twins, after having fallen behind 2-0 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, they won their next three games at home. However, back at the Metrodome, they lost the last two and fell one game short of a World Series title. It would be the Cardinals' last World Series appearance until 2004.

1988 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1988 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 107th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 97th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 76-86 during the season and finished 5th in the National League East division.

Major League Baseball Player of the Month Award

The Player of the Month Award is a Major League Baseball award named by each league every month of the regular season. The National League started recognizing the award on June 4, 1958. National League president Warren Giles conducted a poll of baseball writers in each Major League city and awarded the winner an engraved desk set. The American League did not follow suit until 1974. The National League created a separate award for pitchers starting in 1975 and the American League did likewise in 1979. Pitchers have not been eligible since then.

Mike Witt's perfect game

On September 30, 1984, Mike Witt of the California Angels threw a perfect game against the Texas Rangers at Arlington Stadium. It was the 11th perfect game in Major League Baseball history.Witt's perfect game came on the last day of the 1984 MLB season. As the Angels and Rangers had both been eliminated from the playoffs, only 8,375 fans attended the game. Witt was opposed by Charlie Hough of the Rangers, who allowed only one run to the Angels.Reggie Jackson, whose seventh-inning fielder's choice ground ball scored Doug DeCinces for the game's only run, was also on the winning end of Catfish Hunter's perfect game while with the Oakland Athletics in 1968, becoming the first player to play for the winning team in two perfect games.

Witt also struck out 10 batters during the game. With the win, the Angels finished .500, which they had not done since the 1982 season. Two years later, they would reach the ALCS but lose. The Rangers would have to wait ten years for their perfect game, which they did fittingly enough against the Angels. That game took place in Arlington Stadium's successor, The Ballpark in Arlington.

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