Donny Anderson

Garry Don "Donny" Anderson (born May 16, 1943) is a former professional football player, a halfback and punter for nine seasons with the Green Bay Packers and St. Louis Cardinals of the National Football League.

From Texas Tech (then Texas Technological College, now Texas Tech University), Anderson was the first round draft pick of the Green Bay Packers in the 1965 NFL draft, the seventh overall selection.[1] That year's draft included future hall-of-famers Dick Butkus, Gale Sayers, Joe Namath, and Fred Biletnikoff.

Donny Anderson
No. 44
Position:Running back, Punter
Personal information
Born:May 16, 1943 (age 75)
Borger, Texas
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:215 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Stinnett (TX)
College:Texas Tech
NFL Draft:1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
AFL draft:1965 / Round: Red Shirt 1 / Pick: 1
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Born in Borger, Texas, Anderson grew up in Stinnett, seat of Hutchinson County in the Texas Panhandle, and graduated from Stinnett High School in 1961. A talented multi-sport athlete, he was all-state in football and basketball, placed in the state track meet (hurdles and relay) and played baseball in the summer.[2][3]

College career

At Texas Tech in Lubbock, Anderson earned the nickname the "Golden Palomino." [4] He received All-American honors twice (1964 & 1965)[5] and was a three-time all-Southwest Conference halfback (1963–65). Anderson held many of Texas Tech's football records and finished fourth in the 1965 Heisman Trophy race.[6][7] He is part of the Texas Tech Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame.

Because of a redshirt year due to academic issues,[2][3] Anderson was eligible as underclassman for the 1965 NFL Draft, then known as a "future" pick.[1][8][9] In 1964, he ran for 966 yards with 3 TD and had 32 catches for 396 yards and 4 TD;[10] Despite being selected by the Packers, he returned for his senior season at Texas Tech in 1965 and led the Red Raiders to an 8-2 regular season and a berth in the Gator Bowl on the afternoon of New Year's Eve.[11] As a senior, he ran for 705 yards with 10 TD and had 60 catches for 797 yards and 7 TD.

Selected the outstanding player for Texas Tech in a ten-point loss to Georgia Tech, Anderson signed his pro contract hours after the game. He selected the Packers over the reportedly higher offer from the Houston Oilers of the AFL.[12] His contract was believed to be a then-record $600,000, exceeding Joe Namath's contract of the previous year.[13]

Professional career

Anderson began his NFL career in 1966 as #44 for the world champion Packers. Fellow All-American Jim Grabowski, a fullback from Illinois, was the Packers' first pick in the 1966 NFL Draft, and ninth overall. The well-paid pair were the projected successors of Paul Hornung and Jim Taylor,[14] future hall of famers in their final season with Green Bay. The two rookies were on the College All-Star team that lost to the defending NFL champion Packers 38–0 on August 5 at Soldier Field in Chicago.[15] They joined the Packers' training camp after the game, and were tabbed the "Gold Dust Twins."[16][17]

Though he did not see much playing time as a rookie, he was part of a memorable play. During his second carry in the fourth quarter of Super Bowl I, Anderson's knee knocked out Chiefs defensive back Fred "The Hammer" Williamson, who had been boastful in pre-game interviews.[18] Williamson was carried off on a stretcher.[19]

After six seasons in Green Bay under three head coaches, Anderson was traded in February 1972 to the St. Louis Cardinals for MacArthur Lane.[20][21][22] Anderson played through the 1974 season with the Cardinals, then was traded to the Miami Dolphins in the offseason. At age 32, he recognized that his prospects for playing time were low,[23] and retired during training camp in mid-August 1975.[24][25][26]

Punter

While with the Packers under head coach Vince Lombardi, Anderson originated the concept of hang time in punting. Until Anderson, punters typically strove for maximum distance, with the NFL's leaders usually averaging 45 or more yards a punt. Punt returns varied, with an average of perhaps 5 yards per return. In 1967, the left-footed Anderson worked instead at punting the ball higher, shortening the distance traveled but increasing the ball's time in the air, allowing better coverage by his team on the punt return. Green Bay punted 66 times that year, 63 of them by Anderson; opponents were able to return only 13 of them for a total of 22 yards, or about ⅓ yard (one foot) per punt.

Lombardi explained the concept to sportswriters who questioned why he didn't try to find a better punter than Anderson, who averaged only 36.6 yards per punt that year. Lombardi pointed out the lack of return yardage. Other punters soon followed Anderson, working for greater hang time. Eventually the NFL changed its rules governing punt coverage, to restore the ability to return punts.

After football

Following his retirement from the NFL, Anderson spent nearly two decades on the celebrity golf tour.[27] As of 2017, Anderson lives in the Dallas area and stays busy with ten grandchildren and his Dallas-based foundation, "Winners for Life," that helps send at-risk kids to college.[28][29]

References

  1. ^ a b Johnson, Chuck (November 29, 1964). "1st round future a Packer 1st". Milwaukee Journal. p. 1, sports.
  2. ^ a b Lea, Bud (February 4, 1966). "Donny excelled in all sports". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2-part 2.
  3. ^ a b Beilue, Jon Mark (December 26, 1999). "'The best college football player in America'". Amarillo Globe-News. Retrieved January 9, 2014.
  4. ^ Lea, Bud (February 5, 1966). "'Packers biggest challenge'". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1-part 2.
  5. ^ "Garrett, Anderson top All-America list". Spartanburg (SC) Herald. December 2, 1965. p. 42.
  6. ^ "1965 Heisman Trophy voting". Sports Reference. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  7. ^ "Garrett captures Heisman Trophy". News and Courier. Charleston, SC. Associated Press. November 24, 1965. p. 1C.
  8. ^ "Green Bay drafts 9 backs, 10 futures". Milwaukee Sentinel. November 30, 1964. p. 3-part 2.
  9. ^ Lea, Bud (February 3, 1966). "How Packers landed a star". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2-part 2.
  10. ^ "Donny Anderson Stats | College Football at". Sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 2014-08-08. Retrieved 2014-07-14.
  11. ^ "Texas Tech, yearly results". College Football Data Warehouse. 1965-69. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  12. ^ "Anderson signs up with Pack". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. January 1, 1966. p. 1-part 2.
  13. ^ "Anderson to Pack?". Associated Press. December 31, 1965. p. 8-part 2.
  14. ^ "Anderson, Grabowski have to fit usual Green Bay mold, says coach". Tuscaloosa News. Associated Press. January 5, 1966. p. 16.
  15. ^ Lea, Bud (August 6, 1966). "Packers roll over Stars, 38-0". Milwaukee Sentinel.
  16. ^ Maule, Tex (September 12, 1966). "On with the golden game". Sports Illustrated: 53.
  17. ^ "Jim Grabowski quits pro ball". Bryan Times. UPI. September 2, 1972. p. 7.
  18. ^ Daley, Arthur (January 17, 1967). "Did it prove anything?". Nashua (NH) Telegraph. (New York Times). p. 10.
  19. ^ Lea, Bud (January 16, 1967). "Packers 'Super' in routing Chiefs". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1-part 2.
  20. ^ "Cards, Pack make swap of 2 backs". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. February 22, 1972. p. 19.
  21. ^ Johnson, Chuck (November 7, 1973). "Shuffled off to St. Louis, Anderson scores as a Card". Milwaukee Journal. p. 14-part 2.
  22. ^ Lea, Bud (February 23, 1972). "Donny tells of rift with Devine". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1-part 2.
  23. ^ Williams, Gene (August 14, 1975). "Donny Anderson won't hang on". Miami News. p. 1C.
  24. ^ "Donny Anderson quits Dolphins". Bangor Daily News. Associated Press. August 15, 1975. p. 9.
  25. ^ "Donny Anderson calls it quits". Milwaukee Sentinel. wire services. August 15, 1975. p. 1, part 2.
  26. ^ "Anderson, Jaynes leave pro ranks". Milwaukee Journal. press dispatches. August 15, 1975. p. 7, part 2.
  27. ^ Zeller, Ricky (Apr 14, 2011). "Where are they now? Donny Anderson is on the golf course". Packers.com. Retrieved January 9, 2014.
  28. ^ Bryce, Charles (October 13, 2013). "Golf: Anderson recalls 'Ice Bowl,' Texas Tech days". San Angelo Standard-Times. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  29. ^ "About us". Winners for Life. Retrieved January 10, 2014.

External links

1963 Green Bay Packers season

The 1963 Green Bay Packers season was their 45th season overall and their 43rd season in the National Football League. The two-time defending NFL champions posted an 11–2–1 record under fifth-year head coach Vince Lombardi for a second-place finish in the Western Conference, a half game back.

Both losses were inflicted by the Chicago Bears (11–1–2), the NFL champions in 1963, as the indefinite suspension of halfback Paul Hornung was too much for Green Bay to overcome. The Packers had won the previous five regular season games with rival Chicago, but scored just ten points total in the two games in 1963, and needed only a tie in one of them to advance to the championship game. (The tie at Detroit on Thanksgiving did not impact the Packers' title chances; ties were omitted from the winning percentage calculation until 1972.) Chicago's only loss was at last place San Francisco in October and they tied Pittsburgh and Minnesota in consecutive weeks after their second defeat of the Packers.

Quarterback Bart Starr suffered a hairline fracture in his passing hand at St. Louis on October 20. Up 23–0 in the third quarter, Starr couldn't find an open receiver on third down and took off on a run that gained 15 yards, tackled with a late hit out of bounds by Cardinal cornerback Jimmy "Iron Claw" Hill, who was ejected. Second-string quarterback John Roach filled in for the rest of the game, a 30–7 win in 85 °F (30 °C) heat, and the next four starts. Zeke Bratkowski was acquired in late October, waived by the Rams, and saw some action, too. Starr returned a month later, in week eleven on November 24 against San Francisco in Milwaukee, a week after the second loss to Chicago.Following their regular season finale, a 21–17 win at San Francisco on Saturday, Green Bay needed Detroit to defeat the Bears at Wrigley Field on Sunday. The game's progress was updated to the Packers during their flight home; Chicago's 24–14 win ended Green Bay's bid for an unprecedented third consecutive championship game win, which came four years later in 1967.

In the third place Playoff Bowl in Miami three weeks later on January 5, the Packers overwhelmed the Cleveland Browns, 40–23. Green Bay led 28–10 at halftime and extended it to 38–10 in the fourth quarter.This was the eleventh and final season for hall of fame center Jim Ringo as a Packer. In May 1964, he and reserve fullback Earl Gros were traded to the Philadelphia Eagles for linebacker Lee Roy Caffey and a first round draft choice. Ringo played four years with the Eagles and then went into coaching; the draft pick was used to select halfback Donny Anderson as a "future" pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Hall of fame halfback Hornung did not play this season, suspended in April by commissioner Pete Rozelle for betting on NFL games and associating with undesirable persons.

1963 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1963 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Tech University in the Southwest Conference during the 1963 college football season. In their third season under head coach J. T. King, the Red Raiders compiled a 5–5 record (2–5 against conference opponents), tied for sixth place in the conference, and were outscored by opponents by a combined total of 178 to 147. The team's statistical leaders included James Ellis with 536 passing yards, Donny Anderson with 609 rushing yards, and David Parks with 499 receiving yards. The team played its home games at Clifford B. and Audrey Jones Stadium.

1964 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1964 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Tech University in the Southwest Conference during the 1964 college football season. In their fourth season under head coach J. T. King, the Red Raiders compiled a 6–4–1 record (3–3–1 against conference opponents), tied for fourth place in the conference, lost to Georgia in the 1964 Sun Bowl, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 166 to 120. The team's statistical leaders included Tom Wilson with 777 passing yards and Donny Anderson with 966 rushing yards and 396 receiving yards. The team played its home games at Clifford B. & Audrey Jones Stadium.

1965 Gator Bowl (December)

The 1965 Gator Bowl (December) was a college football postseason bowl game that featured the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and the Texas Tech Red Raiders.

1965 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1965 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Tech University in the Southwest Conference during the 1965 college football season. In their fifth season under head coach J. T. King, the Red Raiders compiled an 8–3 record (5–2 against conference opponents), finished in second place in the conference, lost to Georgia in the 1965 Gator Bowl, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 278 to 222. The team's statistical leaders included Tom Wilson with 2,119 passing yards and Donny Anderson with 705 rushing yards and 797 receiving yards. The team played its home games at Clifford B. & Audrey Jones Stadium.

1966 Green Bay Packers season

The 1966 Green Bay Packers season was their 48th season overall and their 46th in the National Football League. The defending NFL champions had a league-best regular season record of 12–2, led by eighth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and quarterback Bart Starr, in his eleventh NFL season.

The Packers beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL championship game, the Packers' second consecutive NFL title, fourth under Lombardi, and tenth for the franchise. Two weeks later, the Packers recorded a 35–10 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the inaugural AFL-NFL Championship Game, retroactively known as Super Bowl I.

Quarterback Starr was named the league's most valuable player (MVP) in 1966. Said Cold Hard Football Facts about Starr's 1966 season, "Starr, always underappreciated, was at his classic assassin-like best in 1966, his lone MVP season. He led the league in completion percentage, yards per attempt and passer rating, while his 4.7-to-1 [touchdown-to-interception] ratio remains one of the very best in history. Starr, as always, cranked out great performances when he absolutely had to: the 1966 Packers, for example, were the worst rushing team in football, with a meager average of 3.5 [yards-per-attempt] on the ground, despite the reputation Lombardi's Packers still carry with them today as a dominant running team." Cold Hard Football Facts also notes that 1966 Packers had the best passer rating differential (offensive passer rating minus opponents passer rating), +56.0, in the Super Bowl Era.

In 2007, the 1966 Packers were ranked as the 6th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

1970 Green Bay Packers season

The 1970 Green Bay Packers season was their 52nd season overall and their 50th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record earning them a third consecutive third-place finish in the four-team NFC Central division. It was the third and final season for Phil Bengtson as head coach; he resigned shortly after the season ended.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Dave Parks

David Wayne Parks (born December 25, 1941) is a former American football wide receiver/end in the NFL. He was the first overall selection in the 1964 NFL Draft out of Texas Technological College (now Texas Tech University). Parks was selected to three Pro Bowls, and was an All-Pro selection two times. In 1965 he captured the "triple crown" of receiving, leading the NFL in receptions, receiving yards, and receiving touchdowns. In 2008 Parks was selected to be enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.

Earl Gros

Earl Roy Gros (August 29, 1940 – July 15, 2013) was an American football running back who played in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons . Born and raised in Louisiana, he played college football at Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge.

Gros was selected in the first round of the 1962 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers and in the second round of the AFL Draft by the Houston Oilers. Gros opted for the NFL, where he backed up fellow LSU Tiger Jim Taylor at fullback and the Packers repeated as NFL champions in his rookie season in 1962. He played two seasons in Green Bay, then was traded with hall of fame center Jim Ringo to the Philadelphia Eagles for linebacker Lee Roy Caffey (and a first round draft choice) in May 1964. The draft choice was used to select halfback Donny Anderson as a "future pick" in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Gros played three seasons with the Eagles (1964–1966), three with the Pittsburgh Steelers (1967–1969), and one game in 1970 with the New Orleans Saints.

He finished his career with 821 rushes for 3,157 yards (3.8 yards per carry) and 28 touchdowns; he also had 142 receptions for 1,255 yards (8.8 yards per reception) and ten touchdowns.

Gros died at age 72 in Louisiana.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Jim Ringo

James Stephen Ringo (November 21, 1931 – November 19, 2007) was a professional American football player, a Hall of Fame center and coach in the National Football League (NFL). He was a ten-time Pro Bowler during his fifteen-year playing career.

John Brockington

John Stanley Brockington (born September 7, 1948) is a former American football player, a running back

in the National Football League (NFL) with the Green Bay Packers and Kansas City Chiefs. He was a first round draft choice out of Ohio State University, and was the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year in 1971.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Texas Tech Red Raiders football honorees

The Texas Tech Red Raiders college football team represents Texas Tech University in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision as a member of the Big 12 Conference's South Division. Texas Tech players and coaches of exceptional ability have received various accolades.

MacArthur Lane

MacArthur Lane (born March 16, 1942) is a former professional football player, a running back in the National Football League for eleven seasons, from 1968 to 1978 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Green Bay Packers, and Kansas City Chiefs.

Born and raised in Oakland, California, Lane graduated from its Fremont High School, where he was all-city. He worked for several years in a machine shop, then played his first season of college football at Merritt College and transferred to Utah State University in 1965. Known as "Truck" in Logan, Lane was a linebacker as a sophomore and moved to running back as a junior, and averaged 6.9 yards per carry for his final two seasons.Lane was the 13th overall selection of the 1968 NFL/AFL Draft, taken by the St. Louis Cardinals.

He was a Pro Bowl selection in 1970 when he led the NFL in rushing touchdowns with eleven. After four seasons in St. Louis, Lane was traded to Green Bay in February 1972 for Donny Anderson. Teamed in the backfield with John Brockington, the Packers won the division and returned to the playoffs for the first time since 1967. Under new head coach Bart Starr in 1975, Lane was traded to Kansas City in July for a future draft pick. He played his final four seasons with the Chiefs, and during the 1976 season, Lane led the NFL in receptions with 66.

Lane was inducted in the Utah State University Athletics Hall of Fame in 2008.

Super Bowl II

The second AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional football, known retroactively as Super Bowl II, was played on January 14, 1968, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. The National Football League (NFL)'s defending champion Green Bay Packers defeated the American Football League (AFL) champion Oakland Raiders by the score of 33–14. This game and Super Bowl III are the only two Super Bowl games to be played in back-to-back years in the same stadium.

Coming into this game, like during the first Super Bowl, many sports writers and fans believed that any team in the NFL was vastly superior to any club in the AFL. The Packers, the defending champions, posted a 9–4–1 record during the 1967 NFL season before defeating the Dallas Cowboys, 21–17, in the 1967 NFL Championship Game (also popularly known as the Ice Bowl). The Raiders finished the 1967 AFL season at 13–1, and defeated the Houston Oilers, 40–7, in the 1967 AFL Championship Game.

As expected, Green Bay dominated Oakland throughout most of Super Bowl II. The Raiders could only score two touchdown passes from quarterback Daryle Lamonica. Meanwhile, Packers kicker Don Chandler made four field goals, including three in the first half, while defensive back Herb Adderley had a 60-yard interception return for a touchdown. Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr was named the MVP for the second straight time, becoming the first back-to-back Super Bowl MVP for his 13 of 24 passes for 202 yards and one touchdown.

Offense
Defense

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