Donald Sutherland

Donald McNichol Sutherland OC (born 17 July 1935)[1] is a Canadian actor whose film career spans more than five decades.[2]

Sutherland rose to fame after starring in a series of successful films including The Dirty Dozen (1967), M*A*S*H (1970), Kelly's Heroes (1970), Klute (1971), Don't Look Now (1973), Fellini's Casanova (1976), 1900 (1976), Animal House (1978), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978), Ordinary People (1980) and Eye of the Needle (1981). He subsequently established himself as one of the most respected, prolific and versatile character actors of Canada.[3][4]

He later went on to star in many other successful films where he appeared either in leading or supporting roles such as A Dry White Season (1989), JFK (1991), Outbreak (1995), A Time to Kill (1996), Without Limits (1998), The Italian Job (2003), Cold Mountain (2003), Pride & Prejudice (2005), Aurora Borealis (2006) and The Hunger Games franchise (2012–2015).

Sutherland has been nominated for eight Golden Globe Awards, winning two for his performances in the television films Citizen X (1995) and Path to War (2002); the former also earned him a Primetime Emmy Award. Inductee of Hollywood Walk of Fame and Canadian Walk of Fame, he also received a Canadian Academy Award for the drama film Threshold (1981). Several media outlets and movie critics describe him as one of the best actors who have never been nominated for an Academy Award.[5][6][7] In 2017, he received an Academy Honorary Award for his contributions to cinema.[8]

He is the father of actors Kiefer Sutherland, Rossif Sutherland and Angus Sutherland.

Donald Sutherland

Donald Sutherland 2014
Sutherland in November 2014
Born
Donald McNichol Sutherland

17 July 1935 (age 83)
ResidenceGeorgeville, Quebec, Canada
Alma mater
OccupationActor
Years active1962–present
Political partyNew Democratic Party
Spouse(s)
Children5, including Kiefer, Rossif, and Angus Sutherland
RelativesSarah Sutherland (granddaughter)
Awards

Early life

Sutherland was born in Saint John, New Brunswick, the son of Dorothy Isobel (née McNichol; 1892–1956) and Frederick McLea Sutherland (1894–1983), who worked in sales and ran the local gas, electricity and bus company.[2][9] He is of Scottish, German and English ancestry.[10][11] As a child, he had rheumatic fever, hepatitis, and poliomyelitis. His teenage years were spent in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.[12] He obtained his first part-time job, at the age of 14, as a news correspondent for local radio station CKBW.

Sutherland graduated from Bridgewater High School. He then studied at Victoria University, an affiliated college of the University of Toronto, where he met his first wife Lois Hardwick (not to be confused with the child star of the same name), and graduated with a double major in engineering and drama. He had at one point been a member of the "UC Follies" comedy troupe in Toronto. He changed his mind about becoming an engineer, and left Canada for Britain in 1957,[13] studying at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art.

Career

Early work

After quitting the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA), Sutherland spent a year and a half at the Perth Repertory Theatre in Scotland.[14] In the early to mid-1960s, Sutherland began to gain small roles in British films and TV (such as a hotel receptionist in The Sentimental Agent episode 'A Very Desirable Plot' (1963)). He featured alongside Christopher Lee in horror films such as Castle of the Living Dead (1964) and Dr. Terror's House of Horrors (1965). He also had a supporting role in the Hammer Films production Die! Die! My Darling! (1965), with Tallulah Bankhead and Stefanie Powers. In the same year, he appeared in the Cold War classic The Bedford Incident and appeared in the TV series The Saint, in the 1965 episode "The Happy Suicide",[15] and in the TV series Gideon's Way, in the 1966 episode "The Millionaire's Daughter". In 1966, Sutherland appeared in the BBC TV play Lee Oswald-Assassin, playing a friend of Lee Harvey Oswald, Charles Givens (even though Givens himself was an African-American).

In 1967, he appeared in "The Superlative Seven," an episode of The Avengers. He also made a second, and more substantial appearance in The Saint. The episode, "Escape Route," was directed by the show's star, Roger Moore, who later recalled that Sutherland "asked me if he could show it to some producers as he was up for an important role... they came to view a rough cut and he got The Dirty Dozen."[16] The film, which starred Lee Marvin and Charles Bronson, was the 5th highest-grossing film of 1967 and MGM's highest-grossing movie of the year.[17]

In 1968, after the breakthrough in the UK-filmed The Dirty Dozen, Sutherland left London for Hollywood.[13] He then appeared in two war films, playing the lead role as "Hawkeye" Pierce in Robert Altman's MASH in 1970; and, again in 1970, as hippie tank commander "Oddball" in Kelly's Heroes.

Mid-career: 1972–2000

Sutherland starred with Gene Wilder in the 1970 comedy Start the Revolution Without Me. During the filming of the Academy Award-winning detective thriller Klute, Sutherland had an intimate relationship with co-star Jane Fonda.[18] Sutherland and Fonda went on to co-produce and star together in the anti-Vietnam War documentary F.T.A. (1972), consisting of a series of sketches performed outside army bases in the Pacific Rim and interviews with American troops who were then on active service. A follow up to their teaming up in Klute, Sutherland and Fonda performed together in Steelyard Blues (1973), a "freewheeling, Age-of-Aquarius, romp-and-roll caper" from the writer David S. Ward.[19]

Grand Canal south 2
The 1973 thriller Don't Look Now was shot in Venice. Both Sutherland and co-star Julie Christie were praised for their performances.

Sutherland found himself as a leading man throughout the 1970s in films such as the Venice-based psychological horror film Don't Look Now (1973), co-starring Julie Christie, a role which saw him nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Actor, the war film The Eagle Has Landed (1976), Federico Fellini's Casanova (1976) and the thriller Eye of the Needle (which was filmed on location on the Isle of Mull, West Scotland). His role as Corpse of Lt. Robert Schmied in the Maximilian Schell's 1976 German film-directed End of the Game is listed in crazy credits. and as the ever-optimistic health inspector in the science fiction/horror film Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) alongside Brooke Adams and Jeff Goldblum.

He helped launch the internationally popular Canadian television series Witness to Yesterday, with a performance as the Montreal doctor Norman Bethune, a physician and humanitarian, largely talking of Bethune's experiences in revolutionary China.[20] Sutherland also had a role as pot-smoking Professor Dave Jennings in National Lampoon's Animal House in 1978, making himself known to younger fans as a result of the movie's popularity. When cast, he was offered either $40,000 up front or two percent of the movie's gross earnings. Thinking the movie would certainly not be a big success, he chose the 40K upfront payment. The movie eventually grossed $141.6 million.[21]

Donald Sutherland (1095412255)
Sutherland in November 1981

He won acclaim for his performance in the Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci's 1976 epic film 1900 and as the conflicted father in the Academy Award-winning family drama Ordinary People (1980), alongside Mary Tyler Moore and Timothy Hutton. In 1981, he narrated A War Story, an Anne Wheeler film. He played the role of physician-hero Norman Bethune in two biographical films in 1977 and 1990.

Some of Sutherland's better known roles in the 1980s and 1990s were in the South African apartheid drama A Dry White Season (1989), alongside Marlon Brando and Susan Sarandon; as a sadistic warden in Lock Up (1989) with Sylvester Stallone; as an incarcerated pyromaniac in the firefighter thriller Backdraft (1990) alongside Kurt Russell and Robert De Niro, as the humanitarian doctor-activist Norman Bethune in 1990's Bethune: The Making of a Hero, and as a snobbish New York City art dealer in Six Degrees of Separation (1993), with Stockard Channing and Will Smith.

In the 1991 Oliver Stone film JFK, he played a mysterious Washington intelligence officer, reputed to have been L. Fletcher Prouty, who spoke of links to the military–industrial complex in the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy.[22] He played psychiatrist and visionary Wilhelm Reich in the video for Kate Bush's 1985 single, "Cloudbusting".

In 1992, he played the role of Merrick in the movie Buffy the Vampire Slayer, with Kristy Swanson. In 1994, he played the head of a government agency hunting for aliens that take over people's bodies similar to the premise of Invasion of the Body Snatchers in the movie of Robert A. Heinlein's 1951 book The Puppet Masters.

In 1994, Sutherland played a software company's scheming CEO in Barry Levinson's drama Disclosure opposite Michael Douglas and Demi Moore, and in 1995 was cast as Maj. Gen. Donald McClintock in Wolfgang Petersen's Outbreak. He was later cast in 1996 (for only the second time) with his son Kiefer in Joel Schumacher's A Time to Kill.

Sutherland played famous American Civil War General P.G.T. Beauregard in the 1999 film The Hunley. He played an astronaut in Space Cowboys (2000), with co-stars Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones and James Garner. Sutherland was a model for Chris Claremont and John Byrne to create Donald Pierce, the character in the Marvel Comics, which the last name comes from Sutherland's character in the 1970 film's M*A*S*H, Hawkeye Pierce.

Recent work: 2000–present

Olympic flag carried into BC Place at 2010 Winter Olympics opening ceremony (cropped)
Several notable Canadians, including Sutherland (right front), carrying the Olympic flag at the 2010 Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Vancouver

In more recent years, Sutherland was known for his role as Reverend Monroe in the Civil War drama Cold Mountain (2003), in the remake of The Italian Job (2003), in the TV series Commander in Chief (2005–2006), in the movie Fierce People (2005) with Diane Lane and Anton Yelchin, and as Mr. Bennet in Pride & Prejudice (2005), starring alongside Keira Knightley.

Sutherland starred as Tripp Darling in the prime time drama series Dirty Sexy Money for ABC. He played multi-millionaire Nigel Honeycut in the 2008 film Fool's Gold. His distinctive voice has also been used in many radio and television commercials, including those for Delta Air Lines, Volvo automobiles, and Simply Orange orange juice.

Sutherland provided voice-overs and narration during the intro of the 1st semifinal of Eurovision Song Contest 2009, and the Opening Ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, and was also one of the Olympic flag bearers. He was also narrator of CTV's "I Believe" television ads in the lead up to the Games. During the games, Sutherland attended some of the events. In 2010, he starred alongside an ensemble cast in a TV adaptation of Ken Follett's novel The Pillars of the Earth.

ROMY2011 a22 Donald Sutherland
Sutherland in April 2011

Beginning in 2012, Sutherland portrayed President Snow, the main antagonist of The Hunger Games film franchise, in The Hunger Games (2012), The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013), The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 (2014), and Part 2 (2015). His role was well received by fans and critics.

On 26 March 2012, he was a guest on the Opie and Anthony radio show where he mentioned that he had been offered the lead roles in Deliverance and Straw Dogs but turned both offers down because he did not want to appear in violent films at the time. The role in Deliverance went to Jon Voight and the role in Straw Dogs to Dustin Hoffman, and both films enjoyed critical and box office success. After declining these violent roles, he quipped: "and then I played a fascist in 1900 by Bernardo Bertolucci." The television show Crossing Lines premiered on 23 June 2013, on the US network NBC.[23] Sutherland, who played the Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Court named Michel Dorn, was one of only two actors to appear in all episodes across three seasons.[24]

In 2016, he was a member of the main competition jury of the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.[25] On 6 September 2017, it was announced that Sutherland, along with 3 other recipients, will receive an Honorary Oscar, from Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Sutherland's first Academy Award in six decades.[26]

Sutherland currently serves as the narrator of commercials for Simply Orange.

Personal life

Donald Sutherland - Monte-Carlo Television Festival
Sutherland in June 2013

Sutherland was made an Officer of the Order of Canada on 18 December 1978[27] and was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame in 2000.[28] He maintains a home in Georgeville, Quebec.[29]

Sutherland has been married three times. His first marriage, to Lois Hardwick, lasted from 1959 to 1966. His second marriage, which lasted from 1966 to 1970, was to Shirley Douglas, daughter of Canadian social democratic politician and the "father" of Canada's universal healthcare system, Tommy Douglas.[30] Sutherland and Douglas have two children, twins Kiefer, an actor known for his role as Jack Bauer on the TV action/thriller series 24 and currently starring in the ABC political drama Designated Survivor, and Rachel.

Donald Sutherland met his current wife, French Canadian actress Francine Racette, on the set of the Canadian pioneer drama Alien Thunder. They married in 1972 and have three sons: Rossif Sutherland, Angus Redford Sutherland, and Roeg Sutherland.[30]

His four sons have all been named after directors whom Sutherland has worked with: Kiefer is named after American-born director and writer Warren Kiefer, who, under the assumed name of Lorenzo Sabatini,[31] directed Sutherland in his very first feature film, the Italian low-budget horror film Il castello dei morti vivi (Castle of the Living Dead); Roeg is named after director Nicolas Roeg; Rossif is named after French director Frédéric Rossif; and Angus Redford has his middle name after Robert Redford.[30]

Sutherland became a blogger for the American news website The Huffington Post during the 2008 United States presidential election campaign.[32] In his blogs, he stated his support for Barack Obama.[33]

Awards and recognition

Donald Sutherland Star on Canada's Walk of Fame
Sutherland's star on Canada's Walk of Fame

References

  1. ^ Chase, W.D.R.; Chase, H.M. (1994). Chase's Annual Events. Contemporary Books. ISSN 0740-5286. Retrieved 6 December 2014.
  2. ^ a b "Donald Sutherland Biography at". filmreference. 2008. Retrieved 4 April 2008.
  3. ^ Cannes profile page
  4. ^ Britannica biography of Donald Sutherland
  5. ^ Singler, Leigh (19 February 2009). "Oscars: the best actors never to have been nominated". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 June 2013.
  6. ^ Kiang, Jessica (1 January 2016). "30 Great Actors Who've Never Been Oscar Nominated". Indiewire. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  7. ^ Robey, Tim (1 February 2016). "20 great actors who've never been nominated for an Oscar". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  8. ^ "The Academy to honor Charles Burnett, Owen Roizman, Donald Sutherland and Agnès Varda with Oscars at 2017 Governors Awards". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. 6 September 2017. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  9. ^ "Donald Sutherland Biography". Movies.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
  10. ^ Buckley, Tom (17 October 1980). "At the Movies". The New York Times.
  11. ^ Ancestry of Gov. Bill Richardson, wargs.com. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  12. ^ Thomas, Bob (14 October 1989). "Sutherland gets a 'kick-start' for his soul". Gainesville Sun. Associated Press. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  13. ^ a b Sutherland in TV interview during the shooting of The Eagle Has Landed (on the DVD): "I was in England from 1957 until 1968." [Checked 17 June 2012.]
  14. ^ The Courier & Advertiser, Dundee, 23 November 2013.
  15. ^ "The Saint: The Happy Suicide". TV.com. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
  16. ^ MM. "Episode #85 – 5–14". Home.arcor.de. Archived from the original on 13 October 2012. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
  17. ^ "The Dirty Dozen, Box Office Information". The Numbers. Retrieved 8 March 2012.
  18. ^ Cousins, Mark (19 March 2001). "Donald Sutherland – Jane Fonda, "Klute", and "Don't Look Now". BBC. Retrieved 4 April 2008.
  19. ^ Big Rental Films of 1973", Variety, 9 January 1974 p 60
  20. ^ "Donald Sutherland as Norman Bethune". CBC. 25 October 2017.
  21. ^ "National Lampoon's Animal House". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  22. ^ L. Fletcher Prouty JFK, p. xiv, Citadel Press, 1996 ISBN 978-0-8065-1772-8
  23. ^ Percival, Daniel (2013-06-23), Pilot: Part 1, retrieved 2016-11-13
  24. ^ Crossing Lines, 2013-06-23, retrieved 2016-11-13
  25. ^ Rhonda Richford (25 April 2016). "Cannes Film Festival Unveils Full Jury". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
  26. ^ "Charles Burnett and Donald Sutherland Among 4 to Receive Honorary Oscars". 6 September 2017.
  27. ^ Order of Canada citation
  28. ^ Canada's Walk of Fame: Donald Sutherland, actor Archived 30 October 2006 at the Wayback Machine, canadaswalkoffame.com; accessed 15 June 2014.
  29. ^ Berkovich, John (16 September 2003). "Get rid of the Montreal Expos". Buzzle. Retrieved 28 August 2010.
  30. ^ a b c The Observer, 30 March 2008: On the money – interview with Donald Sutherland; retrieved 16 June 2012.
  31. ^ Off Screen Volume 15, Issue 12, 31 December 2011: Warren Kiefer – The Man Who Wasn’t There; retrieved 16 June 2012.
  32. ^ huffingtonpost.com, blog entries by Donald Sutherland
  33. ^ Sutherland, Donald (10 July 2008). "Obama for President". Huffington Post.
  34. ^ "Donald Sutherland biography". Governor General's Performing Arts Awards Foundation. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  35. ^ "Rudolph Giuliani to deliver Middlebury College commencement address May 22". BBC. 10 March 2005. Retrieved 4 October 2013.
  36. ^ "Hollywood Chamber of Commerce". Hollywoodchamber.net. Retrieved 2 March 2011.
  37. ^ "Donald Sutherland receives French honour". BBC. 10 June 2012. Retrieved 10 June 2012.

External links

A Time to Kill (1996 film)

A Time to Kill is a 1996 American crime drama film based on John Grisham's 1989 novel A Time to Kill, directed by Joel Schumacher. Sandra Bullock, Samuel L. Jackson, Matthew McConaughey, and Kevin Spacey star, with Oliver Platt, Ashley Judd, Kiefer and Donald Sutherland, and Patrick McGoohan appearing in supporting roles. Set in Mississippi, the film involves the rape of a young girl, the arrest of the rapists, their subsequent murder by the girl's father, and the father's trial for murder. The film was a critical and commercial success, making $152 million at the worldwide box office. It is the second of two films based on Grisham's novels done by Schumacher, with the other The Client made two years before.

Ad Astra (film)

Ad Astra is an upcoming American epic science fiction thriller film directed by James Gray, and written by Gray and Ethan Gross. The film will star Brad Pitt, Tommy Lee Jones, Ruth Negga, Donald Sutherland and Jamie Kennedy.

Backdraft (film)

Backdraft is a 1991 American drama thriller film directed by Ron Howard and written by Gregory Widen. The film stars Kurt Russell, William Baldwin, Scott Glenn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Rebecca De Mornay, Donald Sutherland, Robert De Niro, Jason Gedrick and J. T. Walsh. It is about Chicago firefighters on the trail of a serial arsonist.

The film grossed $77.9 million domestically and $74.5 million in foreign markets, for a total gross of $152.4 million. The film received three Academy Award nominations.

Disclosure (film)

Disclosure is a 1994 American erotic thriller film directed by Barry Levinson, starring Michael Douglas and Demi Moore. It is based on Michael Crichton's novel of the same name. The cast also includes Donald Sutherland, Rosemary Forsyth and Dennis Miller. The film is a combination thriller and slight mystery in an office setting within the computer industry in the mid-1990s. The main focus of the story, from which the film and book take their titles, is the issue of sexual harassment and its power structure. The film received mixed reviews from critics but was a box office success grossing $214 million against its $50 million budget.

Donald Sutherland (politician)

Donald Sutherland, (April 8, 1863 – January 1, 1949) was a Canadian politician.

Born in Zorra Township, Canada West, he was first ran for the House of Commons of Canada in the riding of Oxford South in the 1908 federal election. He was defeated but was elected in the 1911 federal election. A Conservative, he was re-elected in 1917, 1921, and 1925. He was defeated in 1926, 1930, and in a 1934 by-election. In 1926, he was a Minister without Portfolio in the short lived cabinet of Arthur Meighen. In 1935, he was called to the Senate of Canada to represent the senatorial division of Oxford, Ontario. He died while in office in 1949.

Donald Sutherland filmography

This is the complete filmography of actor Donald Sutherland.

Hollow Point

Hollow Point is a 1996 film directed by Sidney J. Furie and starring Thomas Ian Griffith, Tia Carrere, John Lithgow, and Donald Sutherland.

Kiefer Sutherland

Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland (born 21 December 1966) is a Canadian actor, producer, director, and singer-songwriter. He is known for his role as Jack Bauer in the Fox drama series 24 (2001–2010, 2014), for which he won an Emmy Award, a Golden Globe Award, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and two Satellite Awards. He is the son of actor Donald Sutherland and the father of actress Sarah Sutherland.

He has also starred as Martin Bohm in the Fox drama Touch, and provided the facial motion capture and English voices for Big Boss and Venom Snake in the video games Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes and Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Currently, he stars as President Tom Kirkman in the political drama series Designated Survivor.Sutherland got his first leading film role in the Canadian drama The Bay Boy (1984), which earned him a Genie Award nomination. Since that time he has had a successful movie career, starring in films such as Stand by Me (1986), The Lost Boys (1987), Young Guns (1988), Flatliners (1990), A Few Good Men (1992), The Three Musketeers (1993), A Time to Kill (1996), Dark City (1998), Phone Booth (2002), Melancholia (2011), Pompeii (2014) and Flatliners (2017).

Sutherland has been inducted to the Hollywood Walk of Fame and to Canada's Walk of Fame, and has received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Zurich Film Festival.

Lock Up (film)

Lock Up is a 1989 American prison drama film directed by John Flynn. It stars Sylvester Stallone, Donald Sutherland, Tom Sizemore, and John Amos. It was released in the United States on August 4, 1989.

Max Dugan Returns

Max Dugan Returns is a 1983 American comedy-drama film starring Jason Robards as Max Dugan, Marsha Mason as his daughter Nora, Matthew Broderick as Nora’s son Michael, and Donald Sutherland. Both Matthew Broderick and Kiefer Sutherland (cameo) are featuring in their first film appearance. This would be the last Neil Simon film to be directed by Herbert Ross, as well as the last of his films starring Mason (Simon's wife at the time).

Ordinary People

Ordinary People is a 1980 American drama film that marked the directorial debut of actor Robert Redford. The film stars Donald Sutherland, Mary Tyler Moore, Judd Hirsch, and Timothy Hutton.

The story concerns the disintegration of an upper-middle class family in Lake Forest, Illinois, following the death of one of their sons in a boating accident. The screenplay by Alvin Sargent was based upon the 1976 novel Ordinary People by Judith Guest.

The film received six Academy Awards nominations and won four: the Academy Award for Best Picture, Best Director for Redford, Adapted Screenplay for Sargent, and Supporting Actor for Hutton. In addition, it won five Golden Globe Awards: Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Director (Redford), Best Actress in a Drama (Tyler Moore), Best Supporting Actor (Hutton), and Best Screenplay (Sargent).

Reign Over Me

Reign Over Me is a 2007 American buddy drama film written and directed by Mike Binder, and produced by his brother Jack Binder. The film stars Adam Sandler, Don Cheadle, Jada Pinkett Smith, Liv Tyler, Donald Sutherland, Saffron Burrows and Mike Binder.

Distributed by Columbia Pictures, the film was released on March 23, 2007, and was released to DVD and Blu-ray on October 9, 2007.

Shadow Conspiracy

Shadow Conspiracy is a 1997 American political thriller film starring Charlie Sheen, Donald Sutherland, Linda Hamilton and Sam Waterston. It was the final film directed by George P. Cosmatos, who died in 2005. The film was poorly received by critics. It was released on DVD in the United States in November 2003 by Buena Vista Home Entertainment.

Space Cowboys

Space Cowboys is a 2000 American space drama film directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. It stars Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sutherland, and James Garner as four older "ex-test pilots" who are sent into space to repair an old Soviet satellite.

The Con Artist

The Con Artist is a 2010 romantic comedy film directed by Risa Bramon Garcia and written by Michael Melski and Collin Friesen, starring Rossif Sutherland, Rebecca Romijn, Sarah Roemer and Donald Sutherland. The film was released straight-to-DVD on June 14, 2011.

The Day of the Locust (film)

The Day of the Locust is a 1975 American drama film directed by John Schlesinger, and starring William Atherton, Karen Black, Donald Sutherland, and Geraldine Page. The screenplay by Waldo Salt is based on the 1939 novel of the same title by Nathanael West. Set in Hollywood, California just prior to World War II, it depicts the alienation and desperation of a disparate group of individuals whose dreams of success have failed to come true.

The Hunger Games (film series)

The Hunger Games film series consists of four science fiction dystopian adventure films based on The Hunger Games trilogy of novels, by the American author Suzanne Collins. Distributed by Lionsgate and produced by Nina Jacobson and Jon Kilik, it stars Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen, Josh Hutcherson as Peeta Mellark, Liam Hemsworth as Gale Hawthorne, Woody Harrelson as Haymitch Abernathy, Elizabeth Banks as Effie Trinket, Stanley Tucci as Caesar Flickerman, and Donald Sutherland as President Snow. Gary Ross directed the first film, while Francis Lawrence directed the next three films.

The first three films set records at the box office. The Hunger Games (2012) set records for the opening day and the biggest opening weekend for a non-sequel film. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) set the record for biggest opening weekend of November. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 (2014) had the largest opening day and weekend of 2014. The films, including The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (2015), received a positive reception from critics, with praise aimed at its themes and messages, as well as Jennifer Lawrence's performance.

The Hunger Games is the 20th highest-grossing film franchise of all time, having grossed over US$2.97 billion worldwide.

The Learning Channel's Great Books

Great Books is an hour-long documentary and biography program that aired on The Learning Channel. The series was a project co-created by Walter Cronkite and former child actor Jonathan Ward under a deal they had with their company Cronkite-Ward, The Discovery Channel, and The Learning Channel. Premiering on September 8, 1993, to coincide with International Literacy Day, the series took in-depth looks into some of literature's greatest fictional and nonfictional books and the authors who created them. The series is mostly narrated by Donald Sutherland.

Episodes feature insights from historians, scholars, novelists, artists, writers, and filmmakers who were directly influenced by the novels showcased and discussed.

The Leisure Seeker

The Leisure Seeker is a 2017 comedy-drama film directed by Paolo Virzì, in his first full English-language feature. The film is based on the 2009 novel of the same name by Michael Zadoorian. It stars Donald Sutherland and Helen Mirren, acting together for the first time since the 1990 film Bethune: The Making of a Hero. It was screened in the main competition section of the 74th Venice International Film Festival. Mirren received a Golden Globe nomination for her work in the film.

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