Donald L. Barlett

Donald L. Barlett (born July 17, 1936) is an American investigative journalist and author who often collaborates with James B. Steele. According to The Washington Journalism Review, they were a better investigative reporting team than even Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.[1] Together they have won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and six George Polk Awards. In addition, they have been recognized by their peers with awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors on five separate occasions. They are known for their reporting technique of delving deep into documents and then, after what could be a long investigative period, interviewing the necessary sources.[2] The duo has been working together for over 40 years and is frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele.

Donald L. Barlett
BornJuly 17, 1936 (age 82)
Johnstown, Pennsylvania
OccupationInvestigative journalist, non-fiction writer
Notable credit(s)
The Philadelphia Inquirer, Time, Vanity Fair, books:Empire: The Life, Legend, and Madness of Howard Hughes (with James B. Steele), Forevermore: Nuclear Waste in America (with James B. Steele), America: What Went Wrong?(with James B. Steele), America: Who Really Pays the Taxes? (with James B. Steele), America: Who Stole the Dream (with James B. Steele), The Great American Tax Dodge (with James B. Steele), Critical Condition (with James B. Steele).
Spouse(s)Nancy Barlett
Websitehttp://barlettandsteele.com/index.php

Life

Barlett was raised in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. After attending Pennsylvania State University, he served three years as a special agent with the US Army Counter Intelligence Corps until 1956, when he began his journalistic career as a reporter for the Reading (Pennsylvania) Times. Nine years later he became an investigative journalist for The Plain Dealer, and later took similar jobs with The Chicago Daily News and The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was to join his collaborator James B. Steele. In 1997, Barlett and Steele became editors-at-large for Time. In 2006, they moved to Vanity Fair as contributing editors. Over the years, Barlett and Steele wrote on such diverse topics as crime, housing, nuclear waste, tax loopholes, the decline of the middle class's standard of living, Howard Hughes, the role of big money in politics, oil prices, immigration, and health care.

Barlett and Steele won two Pulitzers and were recognized for their contributions to American journalism for their work while at The Philadelphia Inquirer. In 1972, during one of their earliest collaborations for The Inquirer, Barlett and Steele pioneered the use of computers for the analysis of data on violent crimes. Barlett and Steele won their first Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting and the Gerald Loeb Special Award[3][4] in 1975 for a series called "Auditing the Internal Revenue Service" published by The Inquirer.[5] They won their second Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting and the Gerald Loeb Award for Large Newspapers[3] in 1989 at the Inquirer for their coverage of temporary tax breaks embedded in the Tax Reform Act of 1986.[6] Their 1991 Inquirer series America: What Went Wrong? was named by the New York University department of journalism as 51st on its list of the 100 best pieces of journalism of the 20th century.[7] Rewritten as a book it became a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. It is one of seven books Barlett and Steele have published, five of which were written while at The Inquirer.

After 26 years as a team for The Inquirer, Barlett and Steele left to pursue investigative reporting at Time.[8] It was while they were at Time that the investigative reporting team won their two National Magazine Awards, as well at their record breaking 6th George Polk Award, although this time for excellence in magazine journalism.[9]

After leaving Time over monetary issues, Barlett and Steele were hired by Vanity Fair to be contributing editors on the understanding that they would contribute two articles in their signature long-form style each year.[10][11] In 2007, Barlett and Steele, while still working for Vanity Fair, were featured in the PBS documentary series, Exposé: America's Investigative Reports, in an episode entitled "Friends In High Places," which was about government contracts. When asked on the program how they have managed to work for so many years together, Barlett said, "We're both very boring. Who else reads the tax codes?" Their lifelong passion for documents have fueled their career and led to important and award-winning journalism.

Barlett is married and has a son as well as a stepson.

Impact

Barlett and Steele are used as examples in investigative reporting textbooks as a model of technique and excellence in journalism. As career investigative journalists, Barlett and Steele have become well known for their teamwork,[12] "documents state of mind,"[13] consistent accuracy,[14] "replicability" for revealing their sources,[15] and ability to make their work relevant to ordinary people, such as in "America: What Went Wrong?". Their employers, especially Gene Roberts at The Inquirer,[16] provided them with the opportunity to spend a long period of time reviewing documents in pursuit of journalism with depth and gave them the space to publish their work in lengthy articles in newspapers and magazines.

About Barlett and Steele, fellow investigative reporter Bob Woodward said, "They're an institution. They have kind of perfected a method of doing their work, and I have the highest regard for it. Systematic, comprehensive - they take a long time, and they don't mind saying what their conclusions are."[17]

Both Pulitzer Prize Awards illustrate the auditing function of investigative journalism, whereby the press as "The Fourth Estate" watches over government. In 1975, they audited the Internal Revenue Service. In 1989, they acted as watchdogs over the House Ways and Means Committee Chair Dan Rostenkowski and the insertion by Democrats and Republicans of temporary tax breaks in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 that favored business and saved millions.[18]

Barlett and Steele are acknowledged as having affected business investigative journalism throughout their four-decade career, and the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism established an annual award in their name in 2007.

Books

  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1979). Empire: The Life, Legend, and Madness of Howard Hughes. W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0-393-00025-7.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1985). Forevermore: Nuclear Waste in America. W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0-393-01920-9.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1992). America: What Went Wrong?. Andrews and McMeel. ISBN 0-8362-7001-0.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1994). America: Who Really Pays the Taxes?. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-87157-9.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996). America: Who Stole the Dream?. Andrews and McMeel. ISBN 0-8362-1314-9.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000). The Great American Tax Dodge: How Spiraling Fraud and Avoidance are Killing Fairness, Destroying the Income Tax, And Costing You. Little, Brown and Company. ISBN 0-316-81135-1.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004). Critical Condition: How Health Care in America Became Big Business — and Bad Medicine. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50454-3.
  • Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2012). The Betrayal of the American Dream. PublicAffairs. ISBN 1-586-48969-0.

Newspaper articles

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "How the Influential win Billions in Special Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "The Tax Chairmen Fail to Respond to Queries". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A14.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "A Rich Texas Widow Could Save $4 Million". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A15.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-11). "A Millionaire Businessman and his Island Tax Shelter". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-11). "A Tax Favor for Backer of Conservative Causes". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A07.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-12). "How Businesses Influence the Tax-Writing Process". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-13). "Disguising Those who get Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-13). "Investors take over a Vital Atomic Plant a Tax-Saving Strategy Develops". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A10.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "Congress can't add, so the Taxpayer pays". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "The Wall Street star who Started Catalyst Energy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A18.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "A $4 Billion Price Tag to Stop a Nuclear Plant". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A19.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-15). "One Firm's Huge Break". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-16). "Crusing, at Taxpayers' Expense". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-16). "A Big Bailouts for Steel Firms with the Assistance of Heinz". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A07.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-25). "The Tax-Break Sweepstakes". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-25). "The Tax War Between the Chickens and the Pigs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-26). "Family Football Seeks Bonus Through Tax Bill". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-26). "A Historic Hotel and its Quest for a Tax Cut". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1990-11-04). "A Tax Increase for the Rich that's no Increase at all". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

"America: What Went Wrong?"

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-29). "How the Game was Rigged Against the Middle Class". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-20). "Who -- and how many -- in America's Middle Class". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A16.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-20). "After 3 Decades, American Worker Loses out to Mexico". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-21). "The Lucrative Business of Bankruptcy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-22). "Big Business Hits that Jackpot with Billions in Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-23). "Why the World is Closing in on U.S. Economy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-24). "The High Cost of Deregulation". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-25). "For Millions in U.S., a Harsh Reality". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-25). "How Death came to a Once-Prosperous Discount-Store Chain". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A21.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-26). "Raiders work their Wizardry on an All-American Company". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-27). "When you Retire, Will There be a Pension Waiting?". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-27). "Workers Saving for Their Retirement Lose on Junk Bonds". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-28). "How Special Interest Groups have their way with Washington". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1992-02-02). "The Politics of Tax Breaks in an Election Year". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

"America: Who Stole the Dream?"

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-08). "How U.S. Policies are Costing America Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-08). "Why the Series Came to be". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A18.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-09). "Importing Goods, Exporting Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-10). "Endangered Label: Made in the USA". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-11). "The "New" American Worker". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-12). "The Burden of the Working Woman". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-15). "Shortcut to U.S. Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-16). "Say Goodbye to High-Tech Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-17). "The Lobbying Game: Influence-Brokers in D.C.". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-18). "One American Industry that Thrives: Retraining". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-22). "A Nation in Search of Answers". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Magazine articles

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-09). "States At War". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-09). "Corporate Welfare". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-16). "Fantasy Islands". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-23). "Sweet Deal". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-23). "Paying A Price For Polluters". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-30). "The Empire Of The Pigs". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-30). "Five Ways Out". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-02-07). "How The Little Guy Gets Crunched". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-02-07). "How to Become a Top Banana". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-05-15). "Soaked By Congress". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-09-25). "Throwing The Game". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-16). "Who Gets The Money?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-16). "Wheel Of Misfortune". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-23). "Playing The Political Slots". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-02-03). "The Really Unfair Tax". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-05-19). "The Oily Americans". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-05-19). "Iraq's Crude Awakening". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-07-21). "The U.S. is Running Out of Energy". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-10-13). "The Great Energy Scam". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-10-13). "Asleep at the Switch". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-02-02). "Why We Pay So Much for Drugs". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-02-02). "Has Your Life Become Too Much A Game Of Chance?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-09-20). "Who Left the Door Open?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2005-10-23). "The Broken Promise". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2005-10-31). "Where Pensions Are Golden". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (March 2007). "Washington's $8 Billion Shadow". Vanity Fair.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (May 2008). "Monsato's Harvest Of Fear". Vanity Fair.

References

References

Lovelady, Steve (2006-05-18). "Once There Were Giants". CJR Daily.

Notes
  1. ^ Ponnuru, Ramesh (17 July 2000). "Time's Terrible Two: The perils of Barlett and Steele". National Review. LII (13).
  2. ^ Alter, Jonathan (April 24, 1989). "Two Reporters You Don't Want on Your Tail". Newsweek.
  3. ^ a b "Historical Winners List". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  4. ^ "Royster wins Loeb Award for financial journalism". The New York Times. September 25, 1975. p. 64. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  5. ^ "1975 Winners". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  6. ^ "1989 Winners and Finalists". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  7. ^ Barringer, Felicity (March 1, 1999). "Journalism's Greatest Hits: Two Lists of a Century's Top Stories". The New York Times.
  8. ^ O'Reilly, David (Feb 2, 1997). "Barlett, Steele Leave Inquirer After 26 Years". The Philadelphia Inquirer.
  9. ^ Colford, Paul (March 16, 2001). "Time Pair Snare Record Sixth Polk". Daily News (New York).
  10. ^ Seelye, Katharine (May 18, 2006). "Richard Stengel Is Chosen To Be Top Editor at Time". The New York Times.
  11. ^ Seelye, Katharine (August 7, 2006). "An Established Reporting Team Moves to Vanity Fair". The New York Times.
  12. ^ Meyer, Philip (April 28, 2011). "In Pulitzers, journalism's evolution is taking shape". USA Today.
  13. ^ Houston, Brant; Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc. (2009). The Investigative Reporter's Handbook. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's. p. 5. ISBN 978-0-312-58997-4.
  14. ^ Cox, James (April 14, 1992). "Stoking Fires of Debate". USA Today.
  15. ^ Marvin, Carolyn; Philip Meyer (2005). "What Kind of Journalism Does the Public Need?". In Geneva Overholser & Kathleen Hall Jamieson. The Press. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 400–411 [403]. ISBN 978-0-19-517283-6.
  16. ^ Cauchon, Dennis (August 1, 1990). "Roberts to leave 'Inquirer'". USA Today.
  17. ^ Cox, James (April 14, 1992). "Stoking Fires of Debate". USA Today.
  18. ^ Smith, Rosslyn (16 August 2010). "Two Cheers for Old-Fashioned Political Scoundrels". American Thinker. Retrieved 6 September 2010.

External links

1975 Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prizes for 1975, the 59th annual prizes, were ratified by the Pulitzer Prize advisory board on April 11, 1975, and by the trustees of Columbia University on May 5. For the first time, the role of accepting or rejecting recommendations of the advisory board was delegated by the trustees to the university's president, William J. McGill; the change was prompted by the desire of the trustees to distance themselves from the appearance of approval of controversial awards based on work involving what some considered to be illegal leaks, such as the 1972 Pulitzer Prize awarded for the publication of the Pentagon Papers.It was also the first year that the prize for editorial cartooning went to a comic strip artist (Garry Trudeau, writer/artist of Doonesbury), and the first year that a film critic won a Pulitzer (Roger Ebert). Dumas Malone, 83, become the prize's oldest recipient.

1989 Pulitzer Prize

Winners of the 1989 Pulitzer Prize by Category

Allegations of misappropriations related to the Iraq War

Iraq War misappropriation refers to allegations that billions of dollars of US government funds, originally meant for reconstruction and rebuilding programs, were misappropriated during the Iraq War.

Barlett

Barlett may refer to :

Donald L. Barlett (1936-), an American investigative journalist

Barlett-Hann window, a mathematical statistical mass function

Counterintelligence Corps

The United States Army Counter Intelligence Corps (Army CIC) was a World War II and early Cold War intelligence agency within the United States Army consisting of highly trained Special Agents. Its role was taken over by the U.S. Army Intelligence Corps in 1961 and, in 1967, by the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency. Its functions are now performed by its modern-day descendant organization; United States Army Counterintelligence. The National Counter Intelligence Corps Association (NCICA), a veterans' association, was established in the years immediately following World War II by Military Intelligence agents who had served in every area of military and domestic operations. The organization meets annually. Its newsletter, the Golden Sphinx, is published quarterly.

Fort Holabird

Fort Holabird was a U.S. Army post in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, from 1918 to 1973.

Howard Hughes

Howard Robard Hughes Jr. (December 24, 1905 – April 5, 1976) was an American business magnate, investor, record-setting pilot, engineer, film director, and philanthropist, known during his lifetime as one of the most financially successful individuals in the world. He first became prominent as a film producer, and then as an influential figure in the aviation industry. Later in life, he became known for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle—oddities that were caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain from a near-fatal plane crash, and increasing deafness.

As a maverick film tycoon, Hughes gained fame in Hollywood beginning in the late 1920s, when he produced big-budget and often controversial films such as The Racket (1928), Hell's Angels (1930), and Scarface (1932). Later he controlled the RKO film studio.

Hughes formed the Hughes Aircraft Company in 1932, hiring numerous engineers and designers. He spent the rest of the 1930s and much of the 1940s setting multiple world air speed records and building the Hughes H-1 Racer and H-4 Hercules (the Spruce Goose). He acquired and expanded Trans World Airlines and later acquired Air West, renaming it Hughes Airwest. Hughes was included in Flying Magazine's list of the 51 Heroes of Aviation, ranked at No. 25. Today, his legacy is maintained through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Howard Hughes Corporation.

Howard R. Hughes Sr.

Howard Robard Hughes Sr. (September 9, 1869 – January 14, 1924) was an American businessman and inventor. He was the founder of Hughes Tool Company. He invented the "Sharp–Hughes" rotary tri-cone rock drill bit during the Texas Oil Boom. He is best known as the father of Howard Hughes, the famous American business tycoon.

James Aronson Award

The James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism has been awarded since 1990 to honor Hunter College Professor, James Aronson.

This award honors original, written English-language reporting from the U.S. media that brings to light widespread injustices, their human consequences, underlying causes, and possible reforms. This includes but is not limited to: discrimination, exploitation, violations of human rights or civil liberties, and environmental degradation. The Grambs Aronson Cartooning with a Conscience Award is named for his wife, (Blanche Mary) Grambs Aronson. The award, which was established in 1998, seeks to honor Hunter College students who demonstrate prowess in editorial cartooning in either print or digital media.

James B. Steele

James B. Steele (born January 3, 1943) is an American investigative journalist and author. With longtime collaborator Donald L. Barlett he has won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and five George Polk Awards during their thirty five years of service at The Philadelphia Inquirer, Time, and Vanity Fair. The duo are frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele.

Steele was born in Hutchinson, Kansas and was raised in Kansas City, Missouri. He graduated from the University of Missouri–Kansas City and began his career at the Kansas City Times, where he covered politics, labor and urban affairs. In 1970 he joined The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he would begin his collaboration with Barlett.

In a 1972 collaboration for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Steele and Barlett pioneered the use of computers for the analysis of data on violent crimes. Their story, "Auditing the IRS," earned them a Gerald Loeb Special Award in 1975. Twenty years later, they co-authored the series America: What Went Wrong? for The Inquirer, which was named as one of the 100 best pieces of journalism of the 20th century by the New York University School of Journalism. Rewritten into book form, America: What Went Wrong? became a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. It is one of seven books Steele and Barlett have published. In 1989, he and Barlett won the Pulitzer Prize and the Gerald Loeb Award for Large Newspapers for their reporting on the Tax Reform Act of 1986.Barlett and Steele left The Philadelphia Inquirer to become editors-at-large at Time Inc. in 1997. While at Time, they won two National Magazine Awards, the first in 1999 for their three-part series, “What Corporate Welfare Costs You," and the second in 2001 for their three-part series in 2000 on campaign finance.In 2006 Barlett and Steele left Time and were hired by Vanity Fair to be contributing editors on the understanding that they would contribute two articles each year. They were available for this new assignment after Time determined that they had insufficient space for the time of long journalistic investigations. In 2007, Barlett and Steele were featured in the PBS documentary series, Exposé: America's Investigative Reports, in an episode entitled "Friends In High Places."

In January 2017, it was reported that CNN, as part of "a major new initiative in investigative reporting," was hiring Steele along with fellow Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Bernstein as contributing editors, "to advise the team on their work and executives on hiring."Steele is married and has a daughter. His sister Lisa Steele is a video artist living in Canada.

List of George Polk Award winners

The George Polk Awards in Journalism are a series of American journalism awards presented annually by Long Island University in New York.

Paragon Gaming

Paragon Gaming is a gaming company based in Enterprise, Nevada that has owned and managed casinos in the United States and Canada.

Public Storage

Public Storage is an American international self storage company headquartered in Glendale, California, that is run as a real estate investment trust (REIT). It is the largest brand of self-storage services in the US. In 2008, it was the largest of four publicly traded storage REITs. There are more than 2,200 Public Storage self-storage locations in the US, Canada and Europe. It also owns 42 percent of an office parks subsidiary, sells packing supplies, and provides other services. As a REIT, it is owned by real estate investors, who receive more than 90 percent of the company's profits as a return-on-investment.Public Storage Inc. was founded in 1972 by B. Wayne Hughes and Kenneth Volk Jr. It grew to 1,000 locations by 1989, using funding from investors in real estate limited partnerships (RELPs). The private company was re-structured as a publicly traded REIT in 1995, when Storage Equities merged with Public Storage and adopted its name. In 2006 it acquired Shurgard Storage Centers in a $5.5 billion transaction. Shurgard has since been spun-out in to a separate publicly-traded entity, with Public Storage retaining 36.6% of the company.

Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

This Pulitzer Prize has been awarded since 1942 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs in the United States. In its first six years (1942–1947), it was called the Pulitzer Prize for Telegraphic Reporting – National.

Sherman Fairchild Foundation

The Sherman Fairchild Foundation, founded in 1955, is a charitable foundation of Sherman Mills Fairchild, founder and chairman of the many Fairchild Corporations. Fairchild formed two charitable Foundations, the Fairchild Foundation and the Sherman Fairchild Foundation during his lifetime. Upon his death on March 28, 1971 he left the bulk of his 200+ million dollar estate to his Foundations.

The Sherman Fairchild Foundation was founded in 1955, and assets have since grown to $500 million in recent years. It is headquartered in Chevy Chase, MD. Bonnie Burke Himmelman is the current president. Grants usually are in the 25,000 to 100,000 dollar range, however they can be in the millions.

Simplicity Pattern

The Simplicity Pattern Company is a manufacturer of sewing pattern guides, under the "Simplicity Pattern", "It's So Easy" and "New Look" brands. The company was founded in 1927 in New York City. During the Great Depression, Simplicity allowed home seamstresses to create fashionable clothing in a reliable manner. The patterns are manufactured in the US but are distributed and sold in Canada, England, and Australia, in some markets by Burda and in Mexico and South Africa by third-party distributors. The company licenses its name to the manufacture of non-textile materials such as sewing machines, doll house kits, and sewing supplies. Simplicity is now owned by CSS Industries.

The Hillman Prize

The Hillman Prize is a journalism award given out annually by The Sidney Hillman Foundation, named for noted American labor leader Sidney Hillman. It is given to "journalists, writers and public figures who pursue social justice and public policy for the common good."Murray Kempton was the first recipient, in 1950. Organizations have also received the award. Each winner receives $5,000.

Time (magazine)

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition (Time Europe, formerly known as Time Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa, and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition (Time Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition.Time has the world's largest circulation for a weekly news magazine. The print edition has a readership of 26 million, 20 million of whom are based in the United States. In mid-2012, its circulation was over three million, which had lowered to two million by late 2017.Richard Stengel was the managing editor from May 2006 to October 2013, when he joined the U.S. State Department. Nancy Gibbs was the managing editor from September 2013 until September 2017. She was succeeded by Edward Felsenthal, who had been Time's digital editor.

William E. Simon

William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927 – June 3, 2000) was an American businessman, a Secretary of Treasury of the U.S. for three years, and a philanthropist. He became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 9, 1974, during the Nixon administration. After Nixon resigned, Simon was reappointed by President Ford and served until 1977 when President Carter took office. Outside of government, he was a successful businessman and philanthropist. The William E. Simon Foundation carries on this legacy. He styled himself as a strong advocate of laissez-faire capitalism. He wrote, "There is only one social system that reflects the sovereignty of the individual: the free-market, or capitalist, system".

(1974–1979)
(1980–1989)
(1990–1999)
(2000–2009)
(2010–2014)
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
Recipients of the Orwell Award
1975–1999
2000–present

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