Don Talbert

Don Larry Talbert (born March 1, 1939) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Atlanta Falcons, and New Orleans Saints. He played college football at the University of Texas at Austin. He was drafted in the eighth round of the 1961 NFL Draft.

Don Talbert
No. 71, 72
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:March 1, 1939 (age 80)
Louisville, Mississippi
Height:6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight:255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school:Texas City (TX)
College:Texas
NFL Draft:1961 / Round: 8 / Pick: 100
AFL draft:1962 / Round: 34 / Pick: 271
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:103
Games started:32
Fumble recoveries:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Talbert attended Texas City High School, where he practiced football and basketball. He accepted a football scholarship from the University of Texas at Austin, where he was a two-way tackle. He missed the 1958 season with a broken leg.

As a fifth year senior in 1961, he was named All-SWC, All-American and was voted outstanding SWC lineman in the Dallas Times Herald poll.

In 1992, he was inducted into the Longhorns Hall of Honor.[1]

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys (first stint)

Talbert was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the eighth round (100th overall) of the 1961 NFL Draft with a future draft pick, which allowed the team to draft him before his college eligibility was over. He was also selected by the Houston Oilers in the 34th round (271st overall) of the 1962 AFL Draft.

As a rookie in 1962, although he played as a defensive end and linebacker, he was mostly the backup at right offensive tackle and got a chance to start in 4 games.

Talbert was in the reserve officer program at Texas and had to miss the next 2 seasons because of military service in the Vietnam War, where he was a police lieutenant in Saigon.[2] He returned to the team in 1965 and played in all 14 games as a backup.

Atlanta Falcons

The Atlanta Falcons selected him from the Cowboys roster in the 1966 NFL Expansion Draft.[3] He was a two-year starter at left tackle. On July 3, 1969, he was traded along with Errol Linden to the New Orleans Saints in exchange for offensive linemen Roy Schmidt, Jim Ferguson and Jerry Jones.[4]

New Orleans Saints

Talbert was a two-year starter at left tackle with the New Orleans Saints. On August 2, 1971, he was traded to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for defensive end Doug Moore and a fourth round draft choice (#104-Eric Allen).[5]

Dallas Cowboys (second stint)

In 1971, he was a backup until replacing Ralph Neely in the starting lineup at left tackle in the eighth game, after he had a motorcycle accident. Talbert promptly sprained his ankle, he was first replaced with Forrest Gregg and later by Tony Liscio. He was able to be a part of the Super Bowl VI winning team.

He was waived on September 7, 1972 and later put on the future list, where he remained for the rest of the season.[6] He was re-signed in 1973, but was waived on September 5 and placed on the team taxi squad, before being waived again on September 19.[7][8]

Houston Texans/Shreveport Steamer (WFL)

Talbert was selected by the Chicago Fire in the sixth round (64th overall) of the 1974 WFL Draft of NFL and CFL Players. He was signed by the Houston Texans.[9] After playing 11 games, the team relocated to Shreveport, Louisiana on September 18, where they were renamed as the Shreveport Steamer.

Personal life

His younger brother Diron Talbert played defensive tackle in the NFL for the Los Angeles Rams and Washington Redskins.

References

  1. ^ "Don Talbert Texas bio". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  2. ^ "Happy Talbert Rejoins Grid Cowboys". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  3. ^ "Falcons Select Claridge". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  4. ^ "Atlanta Falcons Trade Ray Ogden". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  5. ^ "Pro Grid Traders Busy". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  6. ^ "Day Of Shuffling". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  7. ^ "Football". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  8. ^ "Holloway Named Back Of Week". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  9. ^ "Too Late". Retrieved February 19, 2018.
1961 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1961 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1961 college football season. The selectors for the 1961 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1961 College Football All-America Team

The 1961 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1961. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1961 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

1961 NFL Draft

The 1961 National Football League draft took place at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia on December 27–28, 1960. The league would later hold an expansion draft for the Minnesota Vikings expansion franchise, and the Vikings were also awarded the first selection position in this draft. This draft was also the first regular draft for the Dallas Cowboys as they had only participated in the 1960 NFL expansion draft that year. The Cowboys held the worst record in the NFL the previous season, but selected second in this draft because of the entry of the Vikings into the league.

1962 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1962 Dallas Cowboys season was their third in the league. The team finished with a record of 5 wins, 8 losses, and 1 tie, placing them 5th in the NFL's Eastern Conference.

1965 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1965 Dallas Cowboys season was their sixth in the National Football League and their best record to date, at 7–7. After five consecutive losses, Dallas was 2–5 halfway through the season. They won five of the final seven games and finished in a tie for second place in the Eastern Conference, with the New York Giants, four games behind the defending NFL champion Cleveland Browns (11–3).

The Cowboys defeated the Giants twice and earned the berth in the third place Playoff Bowl in Miami, held three weeks after the regular season, but lost 35–3 to the Baltimore Colts, runners-up of the Western Conference.

1966 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1966 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's inaugural season in the National Football League (NFL). The Falcons finished in seventh place in the NFL Eastern Conference with a record of 3–11, ahead of only the New York Giants.

1966 NFL expansion draft

The 1966 NFL expansion draft was a National Football League (NFL) draft in which a new expansion team, named the Atlanta Falcons, selected its first players. On June 30, 1965, NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle awarded the first NFL franchise in the Deep South to the city of Atlanta and granted ownership to Rankin Smith Sr.So that the Falcons could become competitive with existing teams, the league awarded the Falcons the first pick in the 1966 NFL Draft, supplemented with the final pick in the first five rounds. The NFL also gave the new team the opportunity to select current players from existing teams. That selection was provided by the expansion draft, held on February 15, 1966. In this draft, held six weeks after the regular draft, the existing franchises listed players from which the Falcons could select to switch to the new team.

Each of the 14 established teams froze 29 players on their 40-man rosters that opened the 1965 season (That made 154 players available.). Atlanta picked one of the 11 and then each team froze two more. Atlanta was able to select two more for a total of 42 players chosen. The Falcons paid $8.5 million for the franchise. (Feb 17, 1966 St. Petersburg Times.)

1968 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1968 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's third year in the National Football League (NFL).

1969 New Orleans Saints season

The 1969 New Orleans Saints season was the team's third as a member of the National Football League. They improved on their previous season's output of 4–9–1, winning five games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the third consecutive season. Tom Dempsey led the team in scoring with 99 points and was named to the Pro Bowl. The 1969 Saints surrendered 7.90 yards per-pass-attempt (including quarterback sacks), an NFL record at the time for the Super Bowl Era, and third all-time as of 2012.

1970 New Orleans Saints season

The 1970 New Orleans Saints season was the team's fourth as a member of the National Football League. After spending their first three seasons in the NFL's Eastern Conference, the Saints moved in 1970 to the West Division of the new National Football Conference. They failed to improve on their previous season's output of 5–9, winning only two games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fourth consecutive season.

Following a 1–5–1 start, coach Tom Fears was fired by owner John W. Mecom Jr. and replaced by J.D. Roberts, whose first game was a 19–17 victory over the Detroit Lions at Tulane Stadium in which Tom Dempsey set an NFL record with a 63-yard field goal on the final play; it broke the record held by Bert Rechichar of the Baltimore Colts by seven yards, set seventeen years earlier. Dempsey's record was tied by three: Jason Elam (Denver Broncos, 1998), Sebastian Janikowski (Oakland Raiders, 2011), and David Akers (San Francisco 49ers, 2012). It was broken by Matt Prater of the Broncos in 2013, at 64 yards at elevation in Colorado.

The victory over the Lions was last of the season for the Saints, but both victories came over teams in the thick of the NFC playoff race. The other, a 14–10 triumph over the New York Giants in week three, cost the Giants the NFC East division championship. The Lions qualified for the playoffs as the wild card from the NFC, but were nearly forced into a coin toss with the Dallas Cowboys, a situation which was only averted when the Giants lost their season finale to the Los Angeles Rams.

Diron Talbert

Diron Vester Talbert (born July 1, 1944) is a former American football defensive end.

List of Dallas Cowboys players

This is a complete list of American football players who have played for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least one game in the NFL regular season. The Dallas Cowboys franchise was founded in 1960 as an expansion team. The team has earned the most postseason appearances (28, which includes another league record of 54 postseason games, winning 32 of them), the most appearances in the NFC Championship Game (14), and the 2nd most Super Bowl appearances (8). The Cowboys have played for 10 NFL Championships and have won five, all five being Super Bowls.

List of Texas Longhorns football All-Americans

This is a list of college football All-Americans who have played at the University of Texas at Austin.

List of Texas Longhorns in the NFL draft

This is a list of Texas Longhorns football players in the NFL Draft.

List of family relations in American football

The following is a list of family relations in American football.

Adamle – Tony Adamle (father), Mike Adamle (son)

Adams – Julius Adams (father), Keith Adams (son)

Adams – Sam Adams Sr. (father), Sam Adams Jr. (son)

Agnew – Ray Agnew Jr. (father), Ray Agnew III (son)

Aldridge – Allen Aldridge Sr. (father), Allen Aldridge Jr. (son)

Anderson – Flipper Anderson (father), Dres Anderson (son)

Atkinson – George Atkinson Jr. (father), George Atkinson III (son)

Ayodele – Akin Ayodele, Remi Ayodele (brothers)

Ayanbadejo – Obafemi Ayanbadejo, Brendon Ayanbadejo (brothers)

Bahr – Chris Bahr, Matt Bahr (brothers)

Bailey – Champ Bailey, Boss Bailey (brothers)

Bakhtiari – Eric Bakhtiari, David Bakhtiari (brothers)

Barber – Ronde Barber, Tiki Barber (twin brothers)

Barber – Marion Barber Jr. (father); Marion Barber III, Dominique Barber (sons)

Belichick – Steve Belichick (father); Bill Belichick (son); Stephen Belichick (grandson)

Bennett – Michael Bennett, Martellus Bennett (brothers)

Berry – Eric Berry, Evan Berry (brothers)

Blackwood – Lyle Blackwood, Glenn Blackwood (brothers)

Blades – Bennie Blades, Brian Blades (brothers), H.B. Blades (son of Bennie)

Bolden/Pitts – Brandon Bolden and Frank Pitts (grandson and grandfather)

Bosa/Kumerow – John Bosa (father), Eric Kumerow (brother-in-law), Joey Bosa (son of John, nephew of Eric)

Bowden – Bobby Bowden (father); Tommy Bowden, Jeff Bowden, Terry Bowden (sons).

Bradshaw – Terry Bradshaw, Craig Bradshaw (brothers)

Brown – Orlando Brown (father), Orlando Brown Jr. (son)

Brown/Thompkins – Eddie Brown (father), Antonio Brown (son), Kenbrell Thompkins (cousin of Antonio)

Butkus – Dick Butkus (uncle), Luke Butkus (nephew)

Byrd – Gill Byrd (father), Jairus Byrd (son)

Caldwell – Andre Caldwell, Reche Caldwell (brothers)

Carpenter – Rob Carpenter (father), Bobby Carpenter (son)

Carr – David Carr, Derek Carr (brothers)

Carter – Cris Carter (father), Duron Carter (son)

Cash – Keith Cash, Kerry Cash (brothers)

Castille – Jeremiah Castille (father), Tim Castille (son)

Celek – Brent Celek, Garrett Celek (brothers)

Chickillo – Nick Chickillo (father), Tony Chickillo (son), Anthony Chickillo (grandson)

Chubb – Bradley Chubb, Brandon Chubb (brothers); Nick Chubb (cousin)

Clausen – Casey Clausen, Jimmy Clausen, Rick Clausen (brothers)

Cline – Tony Cline (father); Tony Cline Jr. (son)

Coffman – Paul Coffman (father), Chase Coffman (son)

Colquitt – Craig Colquitt, Jimmy Colquitt (cousins); Britton Colquitt, Dustin Colquitt (sons of Craig, nephews of Jimmy)

Cox – Bryan Cox (father), Bryan Cox Jr. (son)

Cromartie/Rodgers-Cromartie/Cromartie-Smith – Antonio Cromartie, Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, Da'Mon Cromartie-Smith, Marcus Cromartie (cousins)

Crumpler – Alge Crumpler, Carlester Crumpler (brothers)

Cunningham – Sam Cunningham, Randall Cunningham (brothers)

Davis – Vernon Davis, Vontae Davis (brothers)

Dawkins – Brian Dawkins (uncle), Dalyn Dawkins (nephew)

DeOssie – Steve DeOssie (father), Zak DeOssie (son)

Derby – Glenn Derby (uncle), A. J. Derby (nephew)

Detmer – Ty Detmer, Koy Detmer (brothers)

Dimitroff – Tom Dimitroff (father), Thomas Dimitroff (son)

Dixon – Brian Dixon, Brandon Dixon (twin brothers)

Donelli – Aldo Donelli; Allen Donelli (brothers)

Dorsett – Tony Dorsett (father), Anthony Dorsett (son)

Edwards – Mario Edwards (father), Mario Edwards Jr. (son)

Ellington – Andre Ellington, Bruce Ellington (cousins)

Ellison – Riki Ellison (father), Rhett Ellison (son)

Elway – Jack Elway (father), John Elway (son)

Fahnhorst – Keith Fahnhorst, Jim Fahnhorst (brothers)

Farmer – George Farmer (father), Danny Farmer (son)

Farr – Mel Farr (father); Mel Farr Jr., Mike Farr (sons)

Fassel – Jim Fassel (father), John Fassel (son)

Fells – Daniel Fells, Darren Fells (brothers)

Flacco – Joe Flacco, Mike Flacco (brothers)

Fletcher – Bryan Fletcher, Terrell Fletcher (brothers)

Fuller – Vincent Fuller, Corey Fuller, Kyle Fuller, Kendall Fuller (brothers)

Gbaja-Biamila – Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila, Akbar Gbaja-Biamila (brothers)

Gaffney – Derrick Gaffney (father), Jabar Gaffney (son)

Geathers – Robert Geathers Sr., Jumpy Geathers (brothers); Robert Geathers Jr., Clifton Geathers, Kwame Geathers (sons of Robert Sr.), Clayton Geathers, Jeremy Geathers (cousins)

Gerhart – Toby Gerhart, Garth Gerhart (brothers)

Gogolak – Pete Gogolak, Charlie Gogolak (brothers)

Golic – Bob Golic, Mike Golic (brothers), Mike Golic Jr. (nephew of Bob, son of Mike)

Gramatica – Martín Gramática, Bill Gramatica (brothers)

Grange – Garland Grange, Red Grange (brothers)

Green – A. J. Green, T. J. Green (cousins)

Griese – Bob Griese (father); Brian Griese (son)

Griffin – Shaquem Griffin, Shaquill Griffin (twin brothers)

Gronkowski – Rob Gronkowski, Dan Gronkowski, Chris Gronkowski, Glenn Gronkowski (brothers)

Gruden – Jon Gruden, Jay Gruden (brothers)

Hager – Britt Hager (father), Bryce Hager (son)

Hakim – Az-Zahir Hakim, Saalim Hakim (brothers)

Hambrick – Darren Hambrick, Troy Hambrick (brothers)

Hannah – Herb Hannah (father); John Hannah, Charley Hannah (sons)

Harbaugh – Jack Harbaugh (father); John Harbaugh, Jim Harbaugh (sons)

Hasselbeck – Don Hasselbeck (father); Matt Hasselbeck, Tim Hasselbeck (sons)

Heyward – Craig Heyward (father); Cameron Heyward (son)

Highsmith – Alonzo Highsmith (father), Alonzo Highsmith Jr. (son)

Hilgenberg – Jerry Hilgenberg (father); Wally Hilgenberg (brother); Jay Hilgenberg, Joel Hilgenberg (sons of Jerry)

Hochuli – Shawn Hochuli (father); Ed Hochuli (son) (family of referees)

Holt – Terrence Holt, Torry Holt (brothers)

Huard – Damon Huard, Brock Huard (brothers)

Ihenacho – Carl Ihenacho, Duke Ihenacho (brothers)

Ingram – Mark Ingram Sr. (father), Mark Ingram Jr. (son)

Ismail – Raghib Ismail, Qadry Ismail (brothers)

Jenkins – Kris Jenkins, Cullen Jenkins (brothers)

Jerry – John Jerry, Peria Jerry (brothers)

Johnson/Thomas - Keyshawn Johnson (uncle), Michael Thomas (nephew)

Jones – Jerry Jones (father), Jerry Jones Jr., Stephen Jones (sons)

Jones – Julius Jones, Thomas Jones (brothers)

Jones-Drew/Ward – Maurice Jones-Drew, T. J. Ward (cousins)

Jordan – Steve Jordan (father), Cameron Jordan (son)

Kalil – Ryan Kalil, Matt Kalil (brothers)

Kearse/Buchanon – Jevon Kearse (uncle), Jayron Kearse (nephew), Phillip Buchanon (cousin of Jayron)

Kelce – Jason Kelce, Travis Kelce (brothers)

Kendricks – Mychal Kendricks, Eric Kendricks (brothers)

Kupp – Jake Kupp (father), Craig Kupp (son), Cooper Kupp (grandson)

Landry – Dawan Landry, LaRon Landry (brothers)

Leggett – Earl Leggett (father), Brad Leggett (son)

Little – Larry Little, David Little (brothers)

Long – Howie Long (father); Chris Long, Kyle Long (sons)

Lott/Nece – Ronnie Lott (father), Ryan Nece (son)

Luck – Oliver Luck (father), Andrew Luck (son)

Lusk – Herbert H. Lusk, Hendrick Hamilton Lusk, Harold Hollingsworth Lusk, (brothers)

Lynch/Johnson/Russell – Marshawn Lynch; Josh Johnson, JaMarcus Russell (cousins)

Manning – Archie Manning (father); Peyton Manning, Eli Manning (sons)

Marion – Jerry Marion (father), Brock Marion (son)

Martin – Nick Martin, Zack Martin (brothers)

Mays – Stafford Mays (father), Taylor Mays (son)

Matthews/Niklas – Clay Matthews, Sr. (father); Clay Matthews, Jr., Bruce Matthews (sons), Clay Matthews III, Kevin Matthews, Casey Matthews, Jake Matthews, Mike Matthews (grandsons), Troy Niklas (Bruce Matthews' nephew)

McCaffrey – Ed McCaffrey (father); Max McCaffrey and Christian McCaffrey (sons)

McAlister – James McAlister (father), Chris McAlister (son)

McClendon – Willie McClendon (father), Bryan McClendon (son)

McCourty – Devin McCourty, Jason McCourty (twin brothers)

McCown – Josh McCown, Luke McCown (brothers)

McCutcheon – Lawrence McCutcheon (father), Daylon McCutcheon (son)

McDonald – Tim McDonald (father); T. J. McDonald, Tevin McDonald (sons)

McDougle – Jerome McDougle, Stockar McDougle (brothers)• McFadden-Darren McFadden-Reggie Swinton (Cousins)

McKay – John McKay (father), John McKay Jr., Rich McKay (sons)

McKenzie – Raleigh McKenzie, Reggie McKenzie (twin brothers)

McKinney – Steve McKinney, Seth McKinney (brothers)

McMillan – Ernie McMillan (father), Erik McMillan (son)

McTyer – Tim McTyer (father), Torry McTyer (son)

Metcalf – Terry Metcalf (father), Eric Metcalf (son)

Mike-Mayer – Nick Mike-Mayer, Steve Mike-Mayer (brothers)

Montgomery– Wilbert Montgomery, Cle Montgomery, Tyrone Montgomery, Fred Montgomery (brothers)

Moorehead – Emery Moorehead (father), Aaron Moorehead (son)

Mora – Jim E. Mora (father), Jim L. Mora (son)

Moss – Eric Moss, Randy Moss (brothers)

Moss – Santana Moss, Sinorice Moss (brothers)

Nolan – Dick Nolan (father), Mike Nolan (son)

Nassib – Carl Nassib, Ryan Nassib (brothers)

Nesser/Schneider/Hopkins - Al Nesser, Frank Nesser, Fred Nesser, John Nesser, Phil Nesser, Ted Nesser (brothers), [[John Schneider]] (brother-in-law), Charlie Nesser (Ted Nesser's son), [[Ted Hopkins]] (Charlie Nesser's cousin)

Newton – Cam Newton, Cecil Newton (brothers)

Ogden – Jonathan Ogden, Marques Ogden (brothers)

Olsen – Merlin Olsen, Orrin Olsen, Phil Olsen (brothers)

Pagano – Chuck Pagano, John Pagano (brothers)

Palmer – Carson Palmer, Jordan Palmer (brothers)

Payton – Eddie Payton, Walter Payton (brothers); Jarrett Payton (son of Walter)

Peko – Domata Peko, Tupe Peko (brothers), Kyle Peko (cousin)

Perkins – Don Perkins (great-uncle), Paul Perkins (great-nephew)

Perriman – Brett Perriman (father), Breshad Perriman (son)

Perry – Michael Dean Perry, William Perry (brothers)

Petrino – Bobby Petrino, Paul Petrino (brothers)

Phillips – Bum Phillips (father), Wade Phillips (son), Wes Phillips (grandson)

Pouncey – Maurkice Pouncey, Mike Pouncey (twin brothers)

Pyne – George Pyne II (father), George Pyne III (son), Jim Pyne (grandson)

Randle – Ervin Randle, John Randle (brothers)

Reed – Brooks Reed, Lucas Reed (brothers)

Reid – Eric Reid, Justin Reid (brothers)

Rice/Matthews – Jerry Rice (father), Jerry Rice Jr. (son); Jordan Matthews (cousin of the Rices)

Robiskie – Terry Robiskie (father), Andrew Robiskie, Brian Robiskie (sons)

Rodgers – Aaron Rodgers, Jordan Rodgers (brothers)

Ryan – Buddy Ryan (father); Rex Ryan, Rob Ryan (twin sons)

Salaam – Sulton Salaam (father); Rashaan Salaam (son)

Sanders – Barry Sanders (father), Barry J. Sanders (son)

Sauer – George Sauer (father); George Sauer Jr. (son)

Saul – Bill Saul, Rich Saul and Ron Saul (twin brothers)

Schwartz – Geoff Schwartz; Mitchell Schwartz (brothers)

Selmon – Dewey Selmon, Lee Roy Selmon (brothers)

Shanahan – Mike Shanahan (father), Kyle Shanahan (son)

Sharpe – Sterling Sharpe, Shannon Sharpe (brothers)

Sharper – Jamie Sharper, Darren Sharper (brothers).

Shepard – Darrell Shepard and Derrick Shepard (brothers); Sterling Shepard (son of Derrick)

Shula – Don Shula (father); Dave Shula, Mike Shula (sons).

Shuler – Mickey Shuler (father); Mickey Shuler, Jr. (son)

Simms – Phil Simms (father); Chris Simms, Matt Simms (sons)

Slater – Jackie Slater (father); Matthew Slater (son).

Smith – Rod Smith, Jaylon Smith (brothers)

Smith – Malcolm Smith, Steve Smith (brothers)

Spikes – Brandon Spikes, Takeo Spikes (cousins)

Stoops – Bob Stoops, Mike Stoops, Mark Stoops (brothers)

Sudfeld – Nate Sudfeld, Zach Sudfeld (brothers)

Suhey – Steve Suhey (father), Matt Suhey (son)

Talbert – Don Talbert, Diron Talbert (brothers)

Tatupu – Mosi Tatupu (father), Lofa Tatupu (son)

Taylor – Fred Taylor (father), Kelvin Taylor (son)

Trufant – Desmond Trufant, Isaiah Trufant, Marcus Trufant (brothers)

Tuiasosopo – Manu Tuiasosopo (father), Marques Tuiasosopo (son)

Turk – Matt Turk, Dan Turk (brothers)

Upshaw – Gene Upshaw, Marvin Upshaw (brothers)

Urlacher – Brian Urlacher, Casey Urlacher (brothers)

Van Buren – Steve Van Buren, Ebert Van Buren (brothers)

Vereen – Shane Vereen, Brock Vereen (brothers)

Vick/Brooks – Michael Vick, Marcus Vick (brothers); Aaron Brooks (cousin to the Vicks)

Ward – Terron Ward, T. J. Ward (brothers)

Washington – Ted Washington Sr. (father), Ted Washington Jr. (son)

Watkins – Jaylen Watkins, Sammy Watkins (brothers)

Watt – J. J. Watt, Derek Watt, T. J. Watt (brothers)

Westbrook – Brian Westbrook, Byron Westbrook (brothers)

Whitehurst – David Whitehurst (father), Charlie Whitehurst (son)

Wilson – George Wilson (father), George Wilson Jr. (son)

Winslow – Kellen Winslow (father); Kellen Winslow II (son)

Wisniewski – Leo Wisniewski, Steve Wisniewski (brothers), Stefen Wisniewski (son of Leo, nephew of Steve)

Young – Willie Young (father); Rodney Young (son)

Zendejas - Luis Zendejas, Max Zendejas, Joaquin Zendejas (brothers), and Tony Zendejas (cousin)

Talbert

Talbert is a surname of Germanic origin. It is recorded in Scotland in the 16th century. The name refers to:

Ansel Talbert (b. unknown, d. 1987), American aviation journalist

Bill Talbert (1918–1999), American professional tennis player

Bruce James Talbert (1838-1881), British architect and interior designer

David E. Talbert (contemporary), American playwright

Diron Talbert (b. 1944), American professional football player

Don Talbert (b. 1939), American professional football player

Florence Cole Talbert (1890–1961), American operatic soprano

Mary Burnett Talbert (1866–1923), American suffragist and reformer

Michel Talbert, pseudonym of French poet and fantasy writer Michel Bernanos (1923–1964)

Richard Talbert (b. 1947), British-American historian, classicist, and professor

Robert M. Talbert, American politician from Missouri

W. Jasper Talbert (1846–1931), American politician from South Carolina; U.S. representative 1893–1903

Texas City High School

Texas City High School (TCHS) is a public high school in Texas City, Texas, in Greater Houston. It is one of two high schools in the Texas City Independent School District (TCISD).

A school building for Texas City High opened in 1952. Another building for Texas City High opened in 1957, and the previous one became Blocker Junior High School.As of 2014, Texas City High School had 1,775 students.

Texas City Independent School District

Texas City Independent School District is a public school district based in Texas City, Texas. It serves most of Texas City and La Marque as well as a portion of Tiki Island.In 2009, the school district was rated "academically acceptable" by the Texas Education Agency.

Tony Liscio

Anthony Liscio (July 2, 1940 – June 18, 2017) was an American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Tulsa.

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