Don Stanhouse

Donald Joseph Stanhouse (born February 12, 1951) is a retired American professional baseball pitcher who had a nine-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career, from 1972 to 1980, with a brief comeback in 1982. He played for the Texas Rangers and Baltimore Orioles of the American League and the Montreal Expos and Los Angeles Dodgers of the National League.

Shuttled back and forth from the bullpen to the starting rotation with the Rangers and Expos, Stanhouse excelled in 1978 after joining the Baltimore Orioles, where Manager Earl Weaver employed him as a full-time closer. Because of his Harpo Marx hairstyle and pre-game batting practice antics – where his primal scream would entertain early ballpark arrivals – he was quickly labeled Stan the Man Unusual, a pun on the nickname "Stan the Man" for Hall-of-Famer Stan Musial.[1]

Stanhouse finished 3rd in the American League in both 1978 & 1979 in saves, recording 45 over that span, helping the Orioles capture the American League Championship in 1979. He was selected to the American League All-Star team in 1979.

Although an effective closer, Stanhouse had a reputation of walking batters he was not willing to face. Frequently his tactics would lead to dangerous situations in close games with multiple base-runners, and send the chain-smoking Weaver pacing back and forth in the dugout in agony. This resulted in Weaver nicknaming Stanhouse Fullpack, referring to the number of cigarettes consumed while watching him pitch. Weaver also was quoted in saying Stanhouse was an asshole, who ruined his health.[1]

Stanhouse left the Orioles as a free agent after the Orioles lost the 1979 World Series and signed a large guaranteed contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was ineffective for the Dodgers in 1980, appearing in 21 games and posting an ERA over 5.00. The Dodgers sent him home during the season. He did not pitch at all in 1981, after which his contract expired and he was not re-signed by the Dodgers. Stanhouse retired after a brief comeback with the Orioles the following year.

After retirement, he became a business consultant for a venture capital firm. Married for 27 years, and a father of three, he lives in Trophy Club, Texas.[1]

Don Stanhouse
Pitcher
Born: February 12, 1951 (age 68)
Du Quoin, Illinois
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 19, 1972, for the Texas Rangers
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1982, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
Win–loss record38–54
Earned run average3.84
Strikeouts408
Saves64
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Klingaman, Mike. "Catching Up With...former Oriole Don Stanhouse", The Toy Department (The Baltimore Sun sports blog), Tuesday, August 18, 2009.

External links

1969 Major League Baseball draft

The 1969 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1969 MLB season. The draft featured future Hall of Famers Bert Blyleven (pick 55) and Dave Winfield (pick 882).

1969 Oakland Athletics season

The 1969 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's compiling a record of 88 wins and 74 losses. With its expansion to 12 teams in 1969, the American League had been divided into two 6-team divisions. In their first year in the newly established American League West, the Athletics finished second, nine games behind the Minnesota Twins. It was the first time they had finished in the first division since 1952. Paid attendance for the season was 778,232.

1972 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 1972 season involved the Rangers finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses. This was the Rangers' first season in Texas, as well as the club's first year in the AL West, after playing their first 11 seasons in Washington, D.C., and from 1969 to 1971 in the American League East.

1975 Montreal Expos season

The 1975 Montreal Expos season was the seventh season in the history of the franchise. The Expos finished in last place in the National League East with a record of 75–87, 17½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1975 Texas Rangers season

The 1975 Texas Rangers season involved the Rangers finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 79 wins and 83 losses. The team hit a major league-leading five grand slams.

1976 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds entered the season as the reigning world champs. The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers. They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees. They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants. The Reds drew 2,629,708 fans to their home games at Riverfront Stadium, an all-time franchise attendance record. As mentioned above, the Reds swept through the entire postseason with their sweeps of the Phillies and Yankees, achieving a record of 7-0. As of 2018, the Reds are the only team in baseball history to sweep through an entire postseason since the addition of divisions.

1976 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1976 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 94th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their first National League East title, as they compiled a record of 101–61, nine games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates, and won 100 games or more for the first time in franchise history.

The Phillies lost the NLCS, 3–0 to the Cincinnati Reds. Danny Ozark managed the Phillies, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium, where the All-Star Game was played that season.

1977 Montreal Expos season

The 1977 Montreal Expos season was the ninth season in the history of the franchise. The team finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 73–87, 26 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. This was the first year the team played their home games in Olympic Stadium, having left Jarry Park after the 1976 season.

1978 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1978 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing fourth in the American League East with a record of 90 wins and 71 losses.

1979 American League Championship Series

The 1979 American League Championship Series was a best-of-five series that pitted the East Division champion Baltimore Orioles against the West Division champion California Angels, who were making their first postseason appearance. The Orioles won the Series three games to one and would go on to lose to the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1979 World Series.

This was the only ALCS between 1971 and 1981 that did not feature either the Oakland Athletics or the Kansas City Royals.

1979 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1979 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. The Orioles finished first in the American League East division of Major League Baseball with a record of 102 wins and 57 losses. They went on to defeat the California Angels in the 1979 American League Championship Series, 3 games to 1, before losing in the 1979 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4 games to 3.

1979 World Series

The 1979 World Series was the 76th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1979 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it was played between the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates (98–64) and the American League (AL) champion Baltimore Orioles (102–57), with the Pirates becoming the fourth team in World Series history to come back from a three games to one deficit to win the Series in seven games. This marked the second time in the 1970s the Pirates won a World Series Game 7 on the road against Baltimore Orioles, the previous time being in the 1971 World Series. The Pirates were famous for adopting Sister Sledge's hit anthem "We Are Family" as their theme song.

Willie Stargell, pitcher Bruce Kison, and catcher Manny Sanguillén were the only players left over from the Pirates team that defeated the Orioles in the 1971 World Series, and Orioles' pitcher Jim Palmer, shortstop Mark Belanger, and manager Earl Weaver were the only remaining Orioles from the 1971 team. Grant Jackson pitched for the Orioles in the 1971 series and for the Pirates in the 1979 series.

In this Series, it was the American League team's "turn" to play by National League rules, meaning no designated hitter and the Orioles' pitchers would have to bat. While this resulted in Tim Stoddard getting his first major league hit and RBI in Game 4, overall, it hurt the Orioles because Lee May, their designated hitter for much of the season and a key part of their offense, was only able to bat three times in the whole series.

Willie Stargell, the series MVP, hit .400 with a record seven extra-base hits and matched Reggie Jackson's record of 25 total bases, set in 1977.

The 1979 Pirates were the last team to win Game 7 of a World Series on the road until the San Francisco Giants defeated the Royals in Kansas City to win Game 7 of the 2014 Series. They were also the last road team to win Game 7 of a championship round, in any major league sport, until the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings 2–1 at Joe Louis Arena to win the 2009 Stanley Cup Finals. With the Steelers having already won Super Bowl XIII, Pittsburgh also became the second city to win both the Super Bowl and the World Series in the same year, with the New York Jets and the New York Mets winning titles in 1969. New York repeated the feat in 1986 (New York Mets and New York Giants), as did the New England area in the 2004 season (Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots) and the 2018 season (Red Sox and Patriots).

1980 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1980 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in second place in the Western Division of the National League, one game behind the Houston Astros. Don Sutton set a Dodger record with his 52nd career shutout this season and the Dodgers also hosted the All-Star game for the first time.

1982 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1982 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses. For the second consecutive season, the Orioles recorded the most grand slams in MLB, hitting eight in 1982.

1983 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1983 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 1st in the American League East with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses. The season culminated with the winning of the 1983 World Series over the Philadelphia Phillies.

1988 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1988 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Willie Stargell.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected no one.

Gary Roenicke

Gary Steven Roenicke (born December 5, 1954 in Covina, California) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder for the Montreal Expos (1976), Baltimore Orioles (1978–85), New York Yankees (1986) and Atlanta Braves (1987–88).

Joe Kerrigan

Joseph Thomas Kerrigan (born November 30, 1954 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former relief pitcher, manager and longtime pitching coach in Major League Baseball.

Stan the Man (disambiguation)

Stan the Man is a nickname that predominantly refers to Stan Musial (1920–2013), an American baseball player.

Stan the Man may also refer to:

Stan Lee (1922-2018), late president and chairman of Marvel Comics

Stan "The Man" Longinidis (born 1965), Australian kickboxer

Stan "The Man" Rofe (1933–2003), former Australian radio disc jockey

Stan "The Man" Stasiak (1937-1997), former American professional wrestler

Stan Collymore (born 1971), English footballer

Don Stanhouse (born 1951), aka Stan the Man Unusual, American baseball player

Stan Wawrinka (born 1985), Swiss professional tennis player

Konstantin Stanislavski (1863–1938), former Russian actor and director

Stiliyan Petrov (born 1979), Bulgarian professional footballer who played in midfield

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