Don Horn

Donald Glenn Horn (born March 9, 1945) is a former American football player, a quarterback in the National Football League for eight seasons with the Green Bay Packers, Denver Broncos, Cleveland Browns, and San Diego Chargers.[1]

Don Horn
No. 13
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:March 9, 1945 (age 74)
South Gate, California
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school:Los Angeles (CA) Gardena
College:San Diego State
NFL Draft:1967 / Round: 1 / Pick: 25
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Passing yards:3,369
Pass completions-attempts:232-465
TDINT:20–36
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Born in South Gate, California, Horn graduated from Gardena High School in Los Angeles in 1963, where he starred in football and baseball for the Mohicans.[1]

He briefly attended Washington State University in Pullman and captained the freshman team,[2] then played college football at Harbor Junior College in Los Angeles. Horn transferred to San Diego State College and played under head coach Don Coryell.[1][2] SDSC was then in the college division of the NCAA, today's Division II, and Horn was an All-American.[1] As a senior, he threw to future NFL receiver Haven Moses, a teammate at Harbor JC.[2]

Playing career

Green Bay Packers

Horn was a first-round selection in the 1967 NFL/AFL draft, 25th overall, taken by the defending Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers.

He served as Bart Starr's back-up in Green Bay for four seasons, although he was in the U.S. Army in 1968 and wasn't activated until hours before the season finale in mid-December. Horn relieved injured back-up Zeke Bratkowski in the first quarter and guided the Packers to a one-point win over the Chicago Bears at Wrigley Field, which denied them the division title.[3][4][5][6]

Horn's greatest game as a professional came in 1969 at Lambeau Field.[7] Playing at home in the season finale on December 21 against the St. Louis Cardinals, he completed 22 of 31 passes for 410 yards, with five touchdown passes and one interception.[8][9] He started five games in 1969, leading the Packers to a 4–1 record and throwing for 1,500 yards, 11 touchdowns and 11 interceptions.[10] Green Bay finished at 8–6, third place in the Central division, four games behind the Minnesota Vikings (12–2), who clinched the division title in November.

In September 1970, the 25-year-old Horn filed for bankruptcy in San Diego.[11][12]

Later career

Concurrent with the 1971 NFL draft, newly hired head coach and general manager Dan Devine traded Horn in January 1971 to the Denver Broncos.[13][14] Horn started nine games (2–6–1) for a 4–9–1 Denver team in 1971, throwing 3 touchdowns against 14 interceptions.[15] After two seasons in Denver under three head coaches, he spent a season each in Cleveland and San Diego.[16]

Horn finished his pro career in 1975 with the Portland Thunder of the soon-defunct World Football League (WFL), where he completed 158 of 272 passes for 1742 yards and 11 TDs and 12 picks. Primarily a reserve as a professional, Horn passed for 3,369 yards and 20 touchdowns in eight NFL seasons.

After football

After his playing career ended, Horn entered the real estate business in Colorado.[1][17]

During a conversation in 2008, Horn talked about the excitement he felt when he was drafted by the Green Bay Packers as their first round draft choice with a contract for $15,000 in 1967. As he stated, "that was over $1,000 a month, something today's players wouldn't even cross the street for."

Packer head coach Vince Lombardi told his players that he was aware "three or four of you are here for the money and are sorry souls." Horn responded that the opposite is true today, that only "three or four are playing now for the love of the game."

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Wolf, Bob (June 6, 1991). "Passing the torch: Don Horn answered the call, helped the San Diego State football program take flight". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 2, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c Brody, Tom C. (November 14, 1966). "On a clear day, San Diego State saw forever". Sports Illustrated: 75.
  3. ^ Rollow, Cooper (December 16, 1968). "Packers end Bear title hopes, 28-27". Chicago Tribune. p. 1, section 3.
  4. ^ "Vikings land Central crown as Horn blows taps for Bears". Pittsburgh Press. UPI. December 16, 1968. p. 36.
  5. ^ Bledsoe, Terry (December 16, 1968). "Horn and Packers knock Bears out of title, 28-27". Milwaukee Journal. p. 13, part 2.
  6. ^ "Packers' Horn tops offensive stars". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Florida. Associated Press. December 17, 1968. p. 20.
  7. ^ Dwyre, Bill (December 22, 1970). "Horn, Packers save their best for last". Milwaukee Journal.
  8. ^ Lea, Bud (December 22, 1969). "Horn sets record in 45-28 win". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2.
  9. ^ ^ "Don Horn Gamelogs" Pro-Football-Reference.com
  10. ^ "Don Horn Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  11. ^ "Horn files for bankruptcy, debts total $137,312.75". Milwaukee Journal. September 24, 1970. p. 19, part 2.
  12. ^ Lea, Bud (September 25, 1970). Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2 https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=JqRRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=vhAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7245%2C4838056. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ Bledsoe, Terry (January 26, 1971). "Packers trade Horn, draft Brockington". Milwaukee Journal. p. 17, part 2.
  14. ^ "Horn, Broncos agree to terms". Milwaukee Journal. February 2, 1971. p. 11, part 2.
  15. ^ "1971 Denver Broncos Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  16. ^ "Don Horn Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  17. ^ Moss, Irv (October 31, 2012). "Colorado Classics: Don Horn, former Denver Broncos quarterback". Denver Post. Retrieved March 2, 2016.

External links

1958 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1958 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1958 Big Ten Conference football season.

1959 Rose Bowl

The 1959 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1, 1959. It was the 45th Rose Bowl Game. The heavily-favored Iowa Hawkeyes defeated the California Golden Bears, 38–12. Bob Jeter, Iowa's star halfback, was named the Rose Bowl Player Of The Game.

Iowa was behind LSU in the two major polls taken prior to the bowl games that year, but was named national champion outright in the only poll (Football Writers) taken after the bowl games.

1966 NCAA College Division football season

The 1966 NCAA College Division football season was the 11th season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

1966 San Diego State Aztecs football team

The 1966 San Diego State Aztecs football team represented San Diego State College during the 1966 NCAA College Division football season. San Diego State competed in the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA). The team was led by head coach Don Coryell, in his sixth year, and played home games at both Aztec Bowl and Balboa Stadium.

They finished the season as champions of the CCAA, undefeated and untied with eleven wins and zero losses (11–0, 5–0 CCAA). The Aztecs finished the season ranked number 1 in both the AP Small College Football Poll and the UPI Small College Football Poll. The offense scored 317 points during the season, while the defense only gave up 105.

At the end of the regular season, San Diego State qualified for the Camellia Bowl, which at the time was the Western Regional Final in the College Division of the NCAA. The Aztecs beat Montana State in the game, 28–7. The Aztecs were voted the College Division national champion at the end of the season.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

1968 Green Bay Packers season

The 1968 Green Bay Packers season was their 50th season overall and the 48th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–7–1 record under first-year head coach Phil Bengston, earning them a third-place finish in the Central Division of the Western Conference. It was also the Packers' first losing season since 1958.

1972 Denver Broncos season

The 1972 Denver Broncos season was the team's 13th season in professional football and third in the National Football League (NFL). The team finished the season with five wins and nine losses. They finished third in the AFC West Division.

Bobby Thomason

Robert Lee "Bobby" Thomason (March 26, 1928 – November 5, 2013) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He was selected to three Pro Bowls. Thomason played college football at Virginia Military Institute and was drafted in the first round of the 1949 NFL Draft.

Thomason married Jean Pierce in 1951. They had one daughter. Both survived him, as, in 2013, he died of heart failure at the age of 85.

Gardena High School

Gardena High School, known as GHS, is a public high school in Harbor Gateway, Los Angeles, California, United States, adjacent to the City of Gardena. It serves grades 9 through 12 and is a part of the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Jack Evans (American football)

John "Jack" Vinson Evans (August 5, 1905 - March 11, 1980) was a National Football League quarterback.

Jim LeClair (quarterback)

James Michael LeClair (born March 23, 1944) is a former American football quarterback in the American Football League. He played for the Denver Broncos. He played college football for C.W. Post.

List of Denver Broncos starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Green Bay Packers starting quarterbacks

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. They are members of the North Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) and are the third-oldest franchise in the National Football League (NFL). The club was founded in 1919 by coach, player, and future Hall of Fame inductee Curly Lambeau and sports and telegraph editor George Whitney Calhoun. The Packers competed against local teams for two seasons before entering the NFL in 1921.

The Packers have had 46 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Packers' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Curly Lambeau, Tony Canadeo, Arnie Herber, Bart Starr and Brett Favre. The team's first starting quarterback was Norm Barry, while the longest serving was Brett Favre. The Packers' starting quarterback for the 2018 season was Aaron Rodgers, who was playing in his 14th season in the NFL.

They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Packers.

Los Angeles Harbor College

Los Angeles Harbor College (LAHC) is a public community college in Wilmington, California. It is one of two community colleges serving the South Bay region of Los Angeles. LAHC serves mainly students from Harbor City, Carson, San Pedro, Gardena, Lomita, Wilmington and the Palos Verdes Peninsula.

LAHC accommodates over 8,900 students per semester, and is located between Wilmington and Harbor City, the heart of the Los Angeles harbor region.

As of 2010, 37% of LAHC's population were part-time students, with 65% describing themselves as full-time. The school population is about 40% male and 60% female.

Randy Wright

Randall Steven Wright (born January 12, 1961) is a former professional American football quarterback and color commentator who played for the Green Bay Packers from 1984 to 1988 and covered Big Ten football for ESPN for 12 years.

Roger Grove

Roger Robert Grove (June 19, 1908 – December 19, 1986) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the Green Bay Packers including the 1931 team that won the NFL Championship. He lettered at Michigan State in 1928, 1929 and 1930.

Roy McKay (American football)

Roy Dale McKay (February 2, 1920 – May 29, 1969) was a player in the National Football League.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.