Don Heinrich

Donald Alan Heinrich (September 19, 1930 – February 29, 1992) was an American football player, coach, and announcer. He played professionally as a quarterback in National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants and Dallas Cowboys, and in the American Football League (AFL) for the Oakland Raiders. Heinrich played college football at the University of Washington.[1][2][3]

Don Heinrich
refer to caption
1954 Bowman football card
No. 11
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:September 19, 1930
Chicago, Illinois
Died:February 29, 1992 (aged 61)
Saratoga, California
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:182 lb (83 kg)
Career information
High school:Bremerton (WA)
College:Washington
NFL Draft:1952 / Round: 3 / Pick: 35
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:56
TDINT:17–23
Passing yards:2,287
Passer rating:49.6
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Born in Chicago, Heinrich was raised in western Washington and graduated from Bremerton High School, west of Seattle, in 1948. In his senior season, he led the Wildcats to the mythical state title.[4]

Playing career

College

He played quarterback at Washington in Seattle, leading the nation in passing in 1950 and 1952,[5][6] and setting many of the school's passing records. His 60.9 completion percentage in 1950 set an NCAA record. Heinrich missed the 1951 season due to a pre-season shoulder separation,[7] and was selected in the third round of the 1952 NFL draft, but stayed in college and played his fifth-year senior season with the Huskies in 1952.

He was inducted into the U.S. Army that November,[8] prior to the Apple Cup in Spokane against Washington State, but was granted a pass to play.[9][10] The Cougars had won the previous year in Husky Stadium while Heinrich was sidelined, but he led the Huskies to a 33–27 victory in 1952 and finished 3–0 in his career against WSC.

Heinrich played just one season (1950) with hall of fame running back Hugh McElhenny. They were expected to play together for three seasons, but McElhenny missed the 1949 season and Heinrich sat out 1951.

He served in the military for just under two years, and also got a chance to play football for Fort Ord. He missed the 1953 NFL season and reported to the Giants in 1954.[11] While in the army, he played for the Fort Ord Warriors,[11] which included running back Ollie Matson.

Pro

Heinrich was selected by the New York Giants in the third round (35th overall) of the 1952 NFL Draft with a future draft pick, which allowed the team to draft him before his college eligibility was over.

As a professional, he played with the New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys, and Oakland Raiders. In his six seasons with the Giants, he saw action in three NFL championship games (1956, 1958, 1959), while being the starting quarterback of the 1956 title team. With Vince Lombardi as the Giants' offensive coordinator (1954–58), Heinrich split time at quarterback with Charlie Conerly, with him being used to probe defenses and Conerly coming into the games to capitalize on weaknesses.[12]

Heinrich was selected by the Cowboys in the 1960 expansion draft. The Dallas head coach was Tom Landry, the defensive coordinator with the Giants through the 1959 season. Heinrich again shared time at quarterback, with veteran Eddie LeBaron and rookie Don Meredith.[1] In 1961, Heinrich was a backfield coach with the Giants. He returned as a player in 1962 after the American Football League Raiders bought his rights from the National Football League Cowboys,[13][14] but saw limited action for the last place Raiders (1–13).

Coaching career

Heinrich held assistant coaching positions in the NFL with the Giants, Los Angeles Rams, Pittsburgh Steelers, New Orleans Saints, and San Francisco 49ers.[1]

Broadcasting career

In 1976, Heinrich began his broadcasting career, working first on Washington Huskies games and also as the first radio game analyst for the Seattle Seahawks Radio Network (working with Pete Gross and Wayne Cody) and then becoming an analyst for the 49ers' games. In 1983 and 1984, Heinrich was a color analyst for ESPN and ABC broadcasts of the United States Football League (USFL).

Heinrich worked with Preview Sports Publications, with whom he published the magazines Don Heinrich's College Football and the Don Heinrich's Pro Preview, until his death. In 1991, he was the analyst for Pac-10 games on Prime Ticket, a cable channel based in Los Angeles.

Honors and death

In 1987, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. In 1974, he was inducted into the State of Washington Sports Hall of Fame.

He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in June 1991,[15] and died at age 62 at his home in Saratoga, California.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Rockne, Dick (March 2, 1992). "UW great Heinrich dies of cancer -- Qb synonymous with Husky football". Seattle Times. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  2. ^ "Don Heinrich is dead; football star was 62". New York Times. (obituary). March 2, 1992. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  3. ^ Florence, Mal (March 4, 1992). "Heinrich stayed close to his ties in football". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  4. ^ Barron, Chris (December 31, 1999). "West Sound Athletes of the Century: Football / male - Don Heinrich". Kitsap Sun. Bremerton, Washington. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  5. ^ "Washington's Don Heinrich is nation's top passing champ". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Florida. Associated Press. December 11, 1952. p. 14.
  6. ^ "NCAA Football Annual Leaders". Hickok Sports. Retrieved 2009-06-24.
  7. ^ "Don Heinrich injured". St. Petersburg Times. Florida. Associated Press. September 9, 1951. p. 54.
  8. ^ "Heinrich called for induction in Army on Nov. 24". Ellensburg Daily Record. Washington. Associated Press. November 13, 1952. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Heinrich plans blazing finale". Lewiston Daily Sun. Maine. Associated Press. November 29, 1952. p. 8.
  10. ^ "29,000 due to pack Memorial Stadium". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. November 29, 1952. p. 9.
  11. ^ a b "Don Heinrich to play with Giants in 1954". Lodi News-Sentinel. California. United Press. January 5, 1954. p. 6.
  12. ^ "Another sacred sports cow has been slain". Wilmington Morning Star. North Carolina. UPI. November 10, 1971. p. 20.
  13. ^ "Cowboys sell Heinrich to weakened Oakland". Victoria Advocate. Texas. Associated Press. July 10, 1962. p. 7.
  14. ^ "Oakland gets Don Heinrich". Gadsden Times. Alabama. UPI. July 12, 1962. p. 10.
  15. ^ "Don Heinrich has cancer". Ellensburg Daily Record. Washington. Associated Press. December 19, 1991. p. 12.

External links

1950 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1950 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1950 college football season.

1952 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1952 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1952 college football season.

1960 Chicago Bears season

The 1960 Chicago Bears season was their 41st regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 5–6–1 record under George Halas, finishing fifth in the NFL Western Conference, a game below .500, a rare sight under a Halas coached team. The Bears lost all three games in December by significant margins, the last two were shutouts.

9th Ohio Infantry

The 9th Ohio Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment that was a part of the Union Army during the American Civil War. The members of the regiment were primarily of German descent and the unit was the first almost all-German unit to enter the Union Army.

Arnold Galiffa

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August Herrmann

August "Garry" Herrmann (May 3, 1859 – April 25, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball.

Dave Sherer

David McDonald Sherer, Jr. (born February 14, 1937 in Galion, Ohio) is a former American football End in the National Football League for the Baltimore Colts and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Southern Methodist University.

Eddie LeBaron

Edward Wayne LeBaron Jr. (January 7, 1930 – April 1, 2015) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the College of the Pacific. He also was an executive vice president of the Atlanta Falcons.

Jeff Hostetler

William Jeffrey Hostetler (born April 22, 1961) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the New York Giants, Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, and Washington Redskins. His nickname is "Hoss."

List of Dallas Cowboys starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Cowboys.

List of New York Giants starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the New York Giants of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Giants.

List of Oakland Raiders starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

List of Seattle Seahawks broadcasters

As of 2013, the Seahawks' flagship stations are 710 KIRO-AM and 97.3 KIRO-FM. 710 AM is the only AM radio station the team has ever been affiliated with, although it has been simulcast on various FM radio stations co-owned with KIRO. Current announcers are former Seahawks receiver Steve Raible (who was the team's color commentator from 1982–2003) and Warren Moon, a former NFL quarterback. Pete Gross, who called the games from 1976 until just days before his death from cancer in 1992, is a member of the team's Ring of Honor. Games are heard on 46 stations in five states and Canada.

List of Washington Huskies starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started for the Washington Huskies. They are listed in order of the date of each man's first start at quarterback.

Little Crow

Little Crow (Dakota: Thaóyate Dúta; ca. 1810 – July 3, 1863) was a chief of a band of the Mdewakanton Dakota people, who were based along the Minnesota River. His given name translates as "His Red Nation," (Thaóyate Dúta). He was known as Little Crow because of a mistranslation by Europeans of his grandfather's name, Čhetáŋ Wakhúwa Máni (literally, "Hawk that chases/hunts walking").

Little Crow is notable for his role in negotiating the treaties of Traverse des Sioux and Mendota of 1851, in which he agreed to remove his band of Dakota to a reservation near the Minnesota River in exchange for annuity goods and payments. In the summer of 1862, the federal government failed to deliver annuities in a timely way, and the Dakota were starving. Little Crow supported the decision of a Dakota war council in August 1862 to try to drive the whites out of the region. Little Crow led warriors in the Dakota War of 1862, but retreated in September 1862 before the war's conclusion in December of that year.

Little Crow was shot and killed on July 3, 1863 by two white settlers, a man and his son. He was scalped and his body was taken to Hutchinson, Minnesota, where it was ritually humiliated and mutilated by white settlers. Some time later his remains were exhumed by Army troops, and eventually the Minnesota Historical Society held and displayed them publicly. In 1971 the Society repatriated his remains, giving them to his grandson. He had Little Crow reinterred at the First Presbyterian Church and Cemetery in Flandreau, South Dakota. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2017.

Mike Rae

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Pete Gross

Peter R. "Pete" Gross (December 28, 1936 – December 2, 1992) a Northwest sports announcer, was a household name in Seattle, Washington for 17 years as the "Voice of the Seahawks". He spent most of his career as a radio play-by-play announcer with KIRO (AM). His most memorable call line was "Touchdown Seahawks!" Steve Raible, who served as color commentator with Pete Gross during much of his 17 years, continues to call that line as the Seahawks play-by-play announcer today. Gross' original broadcast partners on the Seahawks radio broadcasts were Don Heinrich and Wayne Cody.

Before announcing for the Seahawks, Gross called football and basketball play-by-play for the University of Washington as well as for the University of the Pacific. He was the play-by-play announcer on KIRO-TV Seattle SuperSonics telecasts from 1976-78. The Seahawks inducted Gross into the Seahawks Ring of Honor in 1992. In his 17 seasons, Gross called almost every game, only missing five games in 1992 due to cancer. In 1983, Gross was in the broadcast booth as the Seahawks came within one game of the January 1984 Super Bowl.

Tom Kennedy (American football)

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Tony Sarausky

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