Don Drysdale

Donald Scott Drysdale (July 23, 1936 – July 3, 1993) was an American professional baseball player and television sports commentator. A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers for his entire career in Major League Baseball, Drysdale was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award and in 1968 pitched a record six consecutive shutouts and ​58 23 consecutive scoreless innings.[1][2]

One of the most dominant pitchers of the late 1950s and early to mid 1960s,[1] Drysdale stood 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) tall and was not afraid to throw pitches near batters to keep them off balance.[1] After his playing career, he became a radio and television broadcaster.[3]

Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale - Los Angeles Dodgers - 1961
Drysdale in 1961
Pitcher
Born: July 23, 1936
Van Nuys, California
Died: July 3, 1993 (aged 56)
Montreal, Quebec
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1956, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
August 5, 1969, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record209–166
Earned run average2.95
Strikeouts2,486
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1984
Vote78.41% (tenth ballot)

Early life

Drysdale was born in Van Nuys, Los Angeles, and attended Van Nuys High School, where one of his classmates was actor Robert Redford.[4]

Playing career

Pitching for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers, he teamed with Sandy Koufax during the late 1950s and early and middle 1960s to form one of the most dominating pitching duos in history. Nicknamed "Big D" by fans, Drysdale used brushback pitches and a sidearm fastball to intimidate batters,[3] similar to his fierce fellow Hall of Famer Bob Gibson. His 154 hit batsmen remains a modern National League record.

Drysdale consecutive scoreless innings streak
The ball thrown for the final out of Drysdale's 1968 consecutive scoreless innings streak.

Drysdale was a good hitting pitcher. In 14 seasons he had 218 hits, including 29 home runs. Drysdale was occasionally used as a pinch-hitter, once during the World Series.[5]

In 1962, Drysdale won 25 games and the Cy Young Award. In 1963, he struck out 251 batters and won Game 3 of the World Series at Los Angeles' Dodger Stadium over the Yankees, 1–0. In 1965 he was the Dodgers' only .300 hitter and tied his own National League record for pitchers with seven home runs. That year, he also won 23 games and helped the Dodgers to their third World Championship in Los Angeles.

In 1968, Drysdale set Major League records with six consecutive shutouts and ​58 23 consecutive scoreless innings. The latter record was broken by fellow Dodger Orel Hershiser 20 years later. Hershiser, however,did not match Drysdale's record of six consecutive complete game shutouts.[6]

Drysdale ended his career with 209 wins, 2,486 strikeouts, 167 complete games and 49 shutouts. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984, and had his number 53 retired at Dodger Stadium on July 1, 1984. At the time of his retirement, Drysdale was the last remaining player on the Dodgers who had played for Brooklyn.

He won three NL Player of the Month awards: June 1959 (6-0 record, 1.71 earned run average, 51 strikeouts), July 1960 (6-0 record, 2.00 earned run average, 48 strikeouts), and May 1968 (5-1 record, 0.53 earned run average, 45 strikeouts, with 5 consecutive shutouts to begin his scoreless inning streak, which was carried into June).

In 1965, Sandy Koufax declined to pitch the first game of the World Series because it was on Yom Kippur, a Jewish holy day. Drysdale pitched for the Dodgers instead of Koufax, giving up seven runs in 2 2/3 innings. When Walter Alston, the manager, came to the mound to remove him from the game, Drysdale said, "I bet right now you wish I was Jewish, too." The Dodgers lost the game to the Minnesota Twins 8-2 but went on to win the Series 4 games to 3.

Drysdale and Koufax took part in a famous salary holdout together in the spring of 1966, with both finally signing contracts just before the season opened. Those contracts made them the first pitchers to earn more than $100,000 a year.[3]

Broadcasting career

LAret53
Donald Drysdale's number 53 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1984.

A chronically sore shoulder forced Drysdale to retire during the 1969 season. The next year, he started a broadcasting career that continued for the rest of his life: first for the Montreal Expos (19701971), then the Texas Rangers (1972), California Angels (19731979, 1981), Chicago White Sox (19821987), NBC (1977), ABC (1978[7]–1986), and finally back in Los Angeles with the Dodgers (from 1988 until his death in 1993). He also worked with his Angels' partner Dick Enberg on Los Angeles Rams football broadcasts from 19731976.

While at ABC Sports, Drysdale not only did baseball telecasts, but also regional college football games as well as Superstars and Wide World of Sports. In 1979, Drysdale covered the World Series Trophy presentation ceremonies for ABC. On October 11, 1980, Keith Jackson called an OklahomaTexas college football game for ABC in the afternoon, then flew to Houston to call Game 4 of the NLCS between the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies. In the meantime, Drysdale filled in for Jackson on play-by-play for the early innings.

In 1984, Drysdale called play-by-play (alongside Reggie Jackson and Earl Weaver) for the National League Championship Series between the San Diego Padres and Chicago Cubs. On October 6, 1984 at San Diego's Jack Murphy Stadium, Game 4 of the NLCS ended when Padres first baseman Steve Garvey hit a two run home run off Lee Smith. Drysdale on the call:

Deep right field, way back. Cotto going back to the wall...it's gone! Home run Garvey! And there will be tomorrow!

In his last ABC assignment, Drysdale interviewed the winners in the Boston Red Sox's clubhouse following Game 7 of the 1986 American League Championship Series against the California Angels.

While broadcasting for the White Sox, Drysdale generated some controversy while covering a heated argument between an umpire and Sox manager Tony La Russa. LaRussa pulled up the third base bag and hurled it into the outfield, to the approval of the Comiskey Park crowd, and ensuring his ejection. Drysdale remarked, "Go get 'em, Dago!"

For the Sox, Drysdale broadcast Tom Seaver's 300th victory, against the host New York Yankees in 1985. His post-game interview with Seaver was carried live by both the Sox' network and the Yankees' longtime flagship television station WPIX.

1987

Drysdale hosted a nationally syndicated radio show called Radio Baseball Cards. 162 episodes were produced with stories and anecdotes told by current and former Major League Baseball players. The highlight of the series were numerous episodes dedicated to the memory and impact of Jackie Robinson as told by teammates, opponents and admirers. Radio Baseball Cards aired on 38 stations, including WNBC New York, KSFO San Francisco and WEEI Boston, as a pre-game show. A collector's edition of the program was re-released in 2007 as a podcast.[8]

1988

Drysdale conducted all of the National League player interviews for the Baseball Talk series in 1988 (Joe Torre did the same for the American League).

On September 28, 1988, fellow Dodger Orel Hershiser surpassed Drysdale when Hershiser finished the season with a record 59 consecutive scoreless innings pitched. In his final start of the year, Hershiser needed to pitch 10 shutout innings to set the mark – meaning not only that he would have to prevent the San Diego Padres from scoring, but that his own team would also need to fail to score in order to ensure extra innings. The Dodgers' anemic offense obliged, and Hershiser pitched the first 10 innings of a scoreless tie, with the Padres eventually prevailing 2–1 in 16 innings. Hershiser almost did not pitch in the 10th inning, in deference to Drysdale, but was convinced to take the mound and try to break the record. When Hershiser broke Drysdale's record, Drysdale came onto the field to hug him, and said, "Oh, I'll tell ya, congratulations... And at least you kept it in the family."

Drysdale also called Kirk Gibson's walk-off home run in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series[9] for the Dodgers Radio Network:

Gibson a deep sigh, re-gripping the bat, shoulders just shrugged, now goes to the top of the helmet as he always does, steps in with that left foot. Eckersly working out of a stretch, now here’s the 3-2 pitch...and a drive into right field (losing voice) WAY BACK! THIS BALL IS GONE! (followed by two minutes of crowd noise) This crowd will not stop! They can't believe the ending! And this time, Mighty Casey did NOT strike out!!!![10]

Personal life

Don Drysdale plaque
Don Drysdale's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame

In 1958, Drysdale married Ginger Dubberly, a native of Covington, Georgia, and a former Adrian fashion model.[11] The couple had a daughter, Kelly, but divorced in 1982. On November 1, 1986, he married basketball player Ann Meyers, who took the name Ann Meyers-Drysdale. Drysdale and Meyers had three children together: Don Junior ("DJ") (son), Darren (son), and Drew (daughter).

In 1990, Drysdale published his autobiography, Once a Bum, Always a Dodger.

Death

Drysdale was 56 when he died of a heart attack at Le Centre Sheraton in Montreal, Quebec, on July 3, 1993.[3][12] Radio station employees were sent to look for him when he did not appear for the bus ride to Olympic Stadium, where the Dodgers were scheduled to play the Montreal Expos. Hotel staff entered his room and found him face-down near his bed. The coroner estimated that he had been dead for 18 hours. Drysdale's final broadcast was actually the night before his death in the early hours of the following night.

Drysdale's broadcasting colleague Vin Scully, who was instructed not to say anything on the air until Drysdale's family was notified, announced the news of his death by saying, "Never have I been asked to make an announcement that hurts me as much as this one. And I say it to you as best I can with a broken heart."[13] Fellow broadcaster Ross Porter told his radio audience, "I just don't believe it, folks." While this was going on, word reached Drysdale's former White Sox colleague Ken Harrelson as he was calling that evening's game against the Baltimore Orioles; an emotional Harrelson had trouble relaying the news to the viewing audience. Drysdale was replaced by Rick Monday in the broadcast booth.

Among the personal belongings found in Drysdale's hotel room was a cassette tape of Robert F. Kennedy's victory speech after the 1968 California Democratic presidential primary, a speech given only moments before Senator Kennedy's assassination. In the speech, Kennedy had noted, to the cheers of the crowd, that Drysdale had pitched his sixth straight shutout that evening. Drysdale had apparently carried the tape with him wherever he went since Kennedy's murder.[14]

Drysdale's body was cremated and his ashes were placed in the Utility Columbarium in the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California, but they were scattered in 2002.

Media

Television

Drysdale was a popular guest star in several television programs:

  • On the May 2, 1964, episode of The Joey Bishop Show, "Joey and the L.A. Dodgers", Bishop guests are several members of the 1963 World Series Champions LA Dodgers. The teammates show off their various talents, the highlight being Drysdale, a natural singer, crooning "I Left My Heart In San Francisco".
  • On the April 10, 1963, episode of The Beverly Hillbillies, "The Clampetts & The Dodgers", Drysdale and Leo Durocher play golf with Jed and Jethro, and Durocher finds out that Jed and Jethro are good baseball prospects.
  • The Greatest American Hero (episode "The Two Hundred Mile an Hour Fastball", which was first broadcast on November 4, 1981 as a broadcaster for the California Stars.[15]
  • The Brady Bunch episode "The Dropout", which was first broadcast on September 25, 1970.
  • Our Man Higgins episode "Who's on First?" (May 8, 1963).
  • The Donna Reed Show episodes "The Man in the Mask", first broadcast in 1962; "All Those Dreams", first broadcast in 1963; and "Play Ball" and "My Son the Catcher", both first broadcast in 1964. In all four episodes Drysdale plays himself, and in "All Those Dreams" he appeared with first wife, Ginger, and daughter Kelly.
  • Leave It to Beaver episode "Long Distance Call", which was first broadcast on June 16, 1962.[16]
  • The Rifleman episode "Skull", which was first broadcast on January 1, 1962.
  • The Millionaire episode "Millionaire Larry Maxwell", which was first broadcast on March 1, 1960.
  • With his first wife, Ginger, on February 26, 1959 edition of You Bet Your Life with host Groucho Marx.[17] The episode was released on the 2006 DVD "Groucho Marx: You Bet Your Life – 14 Classic Episodes".
  • In 1959, Drysdale appeared as a mystery challenger on the TV panel show To Tell the Truth.
  • The Flying Nun episode "The Big Game", 1st episode of the 3rd season, aired September 17, 1969.[18]
  • In 1960, Drysdale appeared in an episode of Lawman.

Film

  • The number "53" used for Disney's Herbie the Love Bug was inspired by Drysdale.[19]
  • Drysdale appears as himself (pitching) in the 1962 thriller Experiment in Terror starring Glenn Ford and Lee Remick.
  • Drydale's 1958 Topps baseball card served as a focal point in the 2000 movie Skipped Parts starring Jennifer Jason Leigh. In it a grandfather (R. Lee Ermey) makes his 14-year-old grandson (Bug Hall) throw a stack of baseball cards into a fire as a rite of passage of growing up. However, the boy saves the Drysdale baseball card, which is later seen in the final scene of the film.[20]
  • Drysdale appears as a soldier in the E-Club in The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961) starring Robert Mitchum and Jack Webb.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Don Drysdale at the Baseball Hall of Fame". baseballhall.org. Retrieved January 9, 2016.
  2. ^ "1968: Year of the Pitcher". thisgreatgame.com. Retrieved January 9, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Lyons, Richard D. (July 4, 1993). "Don Drysdale Is Dead at Age 56; Hall of Fame Pitcher for Dodgers". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 December 2015.
  4. ^ Henson, Steve (July 12, 1993). "He Never Left Van Nuys High". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 28, 2011.
  5. ^ Chass, Murray (October 27, 1991). "World Series Notebook – Kaat Knows Something About Pitchers at the Plate". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 December 2015.
  6. ^ Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streak
  7. ^ "History of #1 analyst demotions". Classic Sports TV and Media. February 18, 2013. Retrieved April 13, 2013.
  8. ^ "Smarter Podcasts - Delivering Sound Advice - Podcast Production". Smarter Podcasts.
  9. ^ Don Drysdale's call of Gibson home run on YouTube
  10. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpsqaSJkovw
  11. ^ Appearance of Don and Ginger Drysdale on the television quiz show You Bet Your Life with Groucho Marx on February 26, 1958. The full episode of that episode (S08E23) is available for viewing on YouTube. Retrieved May 29, 2017.
  12. ^ SPRINGER, STEVE (8 August 1997). "There's Room for Memories of Drysdale in Montreal" – via LA Times.
  13. ^ Don Drysdale Is Dead on YouTube
  14. ^ "Dodgers treated to screening of 'Bobby'". Major League Baseball.
  15. ^ The Greatest American Hero: The Two-Hundred-Mile-an-Hour Fastball TV.com
  16. ^ TV.com. "Leave It to Beaver: Long Distance Call". TV.com.
  17. ^ "YouTube". www.youtube.com.
  18. ^ TV.com. "The Flying Nun: The Big Game". TV.com.
  19. ^ Herbie The Love Bug Clip from Disney documentary Age of Believing with Dean Jones Walt Disney on YouTube
  20. ^ Mark Armour (April 19, 2017). "Skipped Parts". Society of American Baseball Research. Retrieved April 19, 2017.

External links

Preceded by
Al Michaels
#2 play-by-play announcer, Major League Baseball on ABC
1983-1985
Succeeded by
Keith Jackson
1959 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1959 Los Angeles Dodgers finished in a first-place tie with the Milwaukee Braves, with each club going 86–68. The Dodgers won the pennant as they swept the Braves in a best-of-three playoff series. They went on to defeat the Chicago White Sox in the 1959 World Series in just their second season since leaving Brooklyn. The Dodgers led all 16 Major League Baseball clubs in home attendance, drawing 2,071,045 fans to Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (second game)

The 1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 27th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues composing Major League Baseball. The game was played on August 3, 1959, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California, home of the Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL. The game resulted in a 5–3 victory for the American League. This was the second of two All-Star Games played in 1959, the first game having been played on July 7 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The first Midsummer Classic to be played on the West Coast, this was also one of only two All-Star Games to be played outside the month of July, the other being in 1981.

1960 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1960 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season at 82–72, in fourth place in the National League race, 13 games behind the NL and World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

1962 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1962 Los Angeles Dodgers season was the fifth for the team in Southern California, and the 73rd for the franchise in the National League. After spending the previous four seasons at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, they began the season by opening Dodger Stadium, the team's new ballpark. The stadium opened on April 10 with a game against the Cincinnati Reds. The Dodgers proceeded to win a Los Angeles record 102 games and tied the San Francisco Giants for first place in the National League. The Giants won the ensuing playoff series two games to one.

1962 Major League Baseball season

The 1962 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 9 to October 16, 1962. The National League played a 162-game schedule for the first time, having added the Houston Colt .45s and the New York Mets as expansion teams. The American League had played its first 162-game schedule a year earlier.

The NL returned to New York City after a four-year absence, though the Mets would finish in last place.

The National League went to a tie-breaker series to decide the Pennant winner won by the San Francisco Giants over the Los Angeles Dodgers 2 games to 1.

In the World Series the New York Yankees defeated the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 3.

1963 World Series

The 1963 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Dodgers sweeping the Series in four games to capture their second title in five years, and their third in franchise history. Starting pitchers Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, and ace reliever Ron Perranoski combined to give up only four runs in four games. The dominance of the Dodgers pitchers was so complete that at no point in any of the four games did the Yankees have the lead. New York was held to a .171 team batting average, the lowest ever for the Yankees in the post-season.

This was the first time that the Yankees were swept in a World Series in four staight (the 1922 World Series had one tie).

Of the Los Angeles Dodgers four World Series championships since the opening of Dodger Stadium, this was the only one won at Dodger Stadium. Also, of the six championships from the Dodgers franchise, it remains the only one won at home.

This series was also the first meeting between teams from New York City and Los Angeles for a major professional sports championship. Seven more such meetings have followed with three more times each in the World Series and the NBA Finals, and the 2014 Stanley Cup Final.

1964 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1964 Los Angeles Dodgers finished with a record of 80–82, 13 games behind the National League and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals, tied for sixth place with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1966 Major League Baseball season

The 1966 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 11 to October 9, 1966. The Atlanta Braves played their inaugural season in Atlanta, following their relocation from Milwaukee. Three teams played the 1966 season in new stadiums. On April 12, the Braves ushered in Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium with the Pittsburgh Pirates taking a 3–2 win in 13 innings. One week later, Anaheim Stadium opened with the California Angels losing to the Chicago White Sox, 3–1 in the Angels' debut in neighboring Orange County. On May 8, the St. Louis Cardinals closed out old Sportsman's Park/Busch Stadium I with a 10–5 loss to the San Francisco Giants before opening the new Busch Memorial Stadium four days later with a 4–3 win in 12 innings over the Atlanta Braves.

In the World Series the Baltimore Orioles defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 4 games to 0.

1984 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1984 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected three: Luis Aparicio, Don Drysdale, and Harmon Killebrew.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two players, Rick Ferrell and Pee Wee Reese.

Doc White

Guy Harris "Doc" White (April 9, 1879 – February 19, 1969) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. He played for two teams, the Philadelphia Phillies and the Chicago White Sox, during his career which lasted from 1901 to 1913.

Born in Washington, D.C., "Doc" White was a graduate of the Georgetown University School of Dentistry. He started his professional baseball career in 1901 with the Phillies. In 1903, he jumped to the White Sox of the new American League.

From 1903 to 1906, White won at least 16 games each year; his earned run average was in the league's top four each year, as well. He led the league in ERA in 1906 with a 1.52 mark and went 18–6. That year, the White Sox won the pennant and their first World Series. In Game 5, White recorded the first save in Series history.

The following season, White set a career-high in wins with 27. He pitched effectively for Chicago until 1912, had an off-year in 1913, and then went to the Pacific Coast League from 1914 to 1915.White also gained some recognition as a composer, publishing at least four songs (such as bestseller "Little Puff of Smoke, Good Night" in 1910) with his co-writer Ring Lardner, who was a sportswriter in Chicago during that period.White died at age 89 in Silver Spring, Maryland, just eight months after witnessing Don Drysdale surpass his record of 45 consecutive scoreless innings on June 4, 1968.

He was the last surviving member of the 1906 World Champion Chicago White Sox.

Flashing Spikes

"Flashing Spikes" is a 1962 television play directed by John Ford and starring James Stewart, with a lengthy surprise appearance by John Wayne, billed in the credits as "Michael Morris" (apparently based on Wayne's birth name "Marion Michael Morrison"). The hour-long drama revolving around a disgraced ex-baseball player (Stewart) was broadcast as an episode of the anthology series Alcoa Premiere hosted by Fred Astaire.

The script was based upon a novel by Frank O'Rourke and the supporting cast includes Jack Warden, Tige Andrews, Patrick Wayne, Don Drysdale, Vin Scully, Harry Carey, Jr., and Edgar Buchanan. The Director of Photography was William H. Clothier.

This show's director John Ford, actors James Stewart and John Wayne, and cinematographer William H. Clothier also filmed The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance together the same year.

Flashing Spikes remains available for public viewing at the Paley Center for Media in New York City and Los Angeles.

Jack Sanford

John Stanley Sanford (May 18, 1929 – March 7, 2000) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball, and later in his career a relief pitcher as well, for the Philadelphia Phillies, San Francisco Giants, and California Angels. He finished his career playing very briefly with the Kansas City Athletics.

Sanford was born in Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts. He won the National League's Rookie of the Year award in 1957 with the Phillies for a season with outstanding numbers. That year, he was 19-8 with a 3.08 ERA in 33 starts. He had 15 complete games on the season, including three shutouts. Impressively, he also finished the season with 188 strikeouts, which led the league.

His next seven years would be extremely solid, but never quite as impressive as his rookie season; or according to some, he never improved much after it. After being traded to the Giants for the 1959 season, Sanford went 15-12 with a 3.16 ERA in 222​1⁄3 innings pitched and completed 10 games. That year, he started 31 games and made 36 appearances, 5 out of the bullpen.

Sanford's best bid for a Cy Young Award came in 1962 when he finished 24-7 with a 3.43 ERA for a very good Giants team. He won 16 consecutive decisions from mid-June to mid-September and was named Player of the Month in August for his second straight 6-0 month (he also posted a 3.55 ERA, and 31 SO). Sanford led the Giants to the NL pennant and a chance to face the New York Yankees in the World Series. It was the only time he would get to play in the postseason, but the Giants lost to the Yankees after Sanford lost Game 7, 1-0 to Ralph Terry. (The Giants lost the Series by inches: Yankee second baseman Bobby Richardson caught Willie McCovey's line drive with Willie Mays on second and Matty Alou on third; a foot or two to either side and both runners would have scored and the Giants would have won the Series.) But his statistics in the Series were outstanding. He had a 1.93 ERA with 23​1⁄3 innings pitched and allowed only 16 hits. He had 19 strikeouts and only a 1-2 record due to lack of run support. He would also fall short of a Cy Young Award that year, coming in second in the voting to Don Drysdale.

After he left the Giants, his best seasons were behind him. He ended his career on August 6, 1967 with Kansas City. In his career, he posted a solid 137-101 record with a 3.69 overall ERA in 2049​1⁄3 innings pitched. He pitched in 388 games (293 starts), accumulated 1182 strikeouts and gave up only 840 earned runs. He also finished in the Top 10 in MVP Award voting twice in his career (1957, 1962). He finished 2nd in the league in wins twice, losing in 1957 to only Warren Spahn and in 1962 to Cy Young Award winner Don Drysdale.

Sanford died of a brain tumor at age 70 in Beckley, West Virginia.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers Opening Day starting pitchers

The Los Angeles Dodgers are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Los Angeles. They play in the National League West division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Dodgers have used 22 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 61 seasons in Los Angeles. The 22 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 27 wins, 26 losses and 8 no decisions.The Dodgers started playing in Los Angeles in 1958, after moving from Brooklyn. The first Opening Day game for the Dodgers in Los Angeles was played in San Francisco against the San Francisco Giants on April 15, 1958. California native Don Drysdale was the Dodgers' Opening Day starting pitcher that day, in a game the Dodgers lost 8–0. Dodgers starting pitchers won both of their Opening Day starts in their first home ballpark in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.Kershaw's eight Opening Day starts for the Dodgers from 2011 to 2018 are the most ever by a Dodgers starter, one more than Don Drysdale and Don Sutton. Fernando Valenzuela, Ramón Martínez and Orel Hershiser have had at least four Opening Day starts, with six, five and four respectively. Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax, who won three Cy Young Awards during the 1960s, only made one Opening Day start for the Dodgers, in 1964. Drysdale and Kershaw are also tied for the Los Angeles Dodgers record for most wins as an Opening Day starter, with five wins. Drysdale also had two loses while Kershaw has one loss.Koufax (1964), Chan Ho Park (2001), Brad Penny (2008) and Hiroki Kuroda (2009) are the only Los Angeles Dodgers Opening Day starting pitchers to have won all their Opening Day decisions, Martinez and Derek Lowe share the Los Angeles Dodgers record for most Opening Day losses, with three. The Los Angeles Dodgers won the World Series championship in 1959, 1963, 1965, 1981 and 1988. Drysdale (1959, 1963 and 1965), and Fernando Valenzuela (1981 and 1988) were the Dodgers' Opening Day starting pitchers those years. The Dodgers' starting pitcher won the Opening Day game in 1963, 1965 and 1981, but lost in 1959 and 1988.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers broadcasters

This article details the current and historical radio and television broadcasters for the National League Los Angeles Dodgers, which have been running for over eight decades, which began when the then Brooklyn Dodgers became one of the first MLB teams to begin radio broadcasts and were the first to be featured on a television baseball game broadcast, both during the 1939 season.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers seasons

The Los Angeles Dodgers are the second most successful franchise in the National League and the third-most successful and second-most wealthy in Major League Baseball after the New York Yankees. The franchise was formerly based in Brooklyn and known originally as the "Grays" or "Trolley Dodgers" after the trams which supporters had to avoid to enter games. Later it became known successively as the "Bridegrooms", "Superbas", "Dodgers" and "Robins"; the present "Dodgers" was firmly established in 1932.

The franchise has won the World Series six times and lost a further 13, and like the Yankees and Cardinals have never lost 100 games in a season since World War I, with their worst record since then being in 1992 with 63 wins and their best records ever being in 1953 with 105 wins and both 1942 and 2017 with 104. Their most successful period, between 1947 and 1966 with ten World Series appearances and only two seasons with 71 or more losses (one of them the year they moved to Los Angeles after a dispute over stadium funding), was famous for the Dodgers becoming the first Major League Baseball team to incorporate African American players, led by Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella.

List of Major League Baseball All-Star Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the American radio and television networks and announcers that have broadcast the Major League Baseball All-Star Game over the years.

List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in home runs by pitchers

In baseball, a home run (HR) is typically a fair hit that passes over an outfield fence or into the stands at a distance from home base of 250 feet or more, which entitles the batter to legally touch all bases and score without liability. Atypically, a batter who hits a fair ball and touches each base in succession from 1st to home, without an error being charged to a defensive player, is credited with an inside-the-park home run. If, during a play, defensive or fan interference is called, and the awarded bases allow the batter to cross home plate, the batter is credited with a home run.Wes Ferrell holds the all-time Major League Baseball record for home runs hit while playing the position of pitcher. He hit 37 as a pitcher. Baseball Hall of Famers Bob Lemon and Warren Spahn are tied for second with 35 career home runs apiece. Red Ruffing, Earl Wilson, and Don Drysdale are the only other pitchers to hit at least 25 home runs. Jack Stivetts hit a total of 35 home runs in his playing career, 21 as a pitcher.As of the 2019 season, Madison Bumgarner, with 18 home runs, holds the lead among all active pitchers. Bumgarner also has hit the second most home runs by a pitcher since the American League adopted the designated hitter rule in 1973 (behind Carlos Zambrano). Bumgarner has played his whole career thus far for the San Francisco Giants of the National League.

Ferrell also holds the single-season record for home runs by a pitcher, with nine, a mark that he reached in 1931. The record had previously been held by Stivetts, who had hit seven in 1890. Since 1931, six different pitchers have hit seven home runs in a season: Ferrell, Lemon, Don Newcombe, Don Drysdale (twice), Wilson, and Mike Hampton.Babe Ruth started his major league career as a pitcher before moving to the outfield. Only 14 of his 714 career home runs were hit as a pitcher, however. The first pitcher to officially hit a home run was Jack Manning, who accomplished the feat on August 3, 1876. The most home runs by a pitcher in a single game is three, achieved by Jim Tobin on May 13, 1942.

Accomplishments
Preceded by
Roy Face
Major League Player of the Month
July 1959
Succeeded by
Vern Law & Willie McCovey
Preceded by
Lindy McDaniel
Major League Player of the Month
July 1960
Succeeded by
Warren Spahn
Preceded by
Orlando Cepeda
Major League Player of the Month
May 1968
Succeeded by
Bob Gibson
Preceded by
Don Newcombe
Johnny Podres
Sandy Koufax
Claude Osteen
Los Angeles Dodgers Opening Day Starting pitcher
1958–1961
1963
1965
1969
Succeeded by
Johnny Podres
Sandy Koufax
Claude Osteen
Claude Osteen
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