Dominique Easley

Dominique Earl Easley (born February 24, 1992) is an American football outside linebacker who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Florida. He was drafted by the New England Patriots in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Dominique Easley
Free agent
Position:Outside linebacker
Personal information
Born:24 February 1992 (age 27)
Staten Island, New York
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:263 lb (119 kg)
Career information
High school:Curtis
(Staten Island, New York)
College:Florida
NFL Draft:2014 / Round: 1 / Pick: 29
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Total tackles:64
Sacks:6.5
Forced fumbles:2
Pass deflections:2
Interceptions:1
Player stats at NFL.com

High school career

Easley attended Curtis High School in Staten Island, New York, where he played football and competed in track. In football, he was selected to play in the 2010 Under Armour All-America Game in St. Petersburg, Florida, where he announced his commitment to attend the University of Florida.[1]

Easley also competed in track & field as a junior. At the 2009 PSAL Burough Championships, he won the shot put event, with a throw of 40 ft, and placed 10th in the 55-meter dash, with a time of 7.44 seconds.[2] He took 8th in the shot put at the 2009 PSAL City Champs, with a PR of 43 ft 7 in.[3]

Considered a five-star recruit by ESPN.com, Easley was listed as the No. 1 defensive tackle in the nation in 2010.[4]

College career

Easley accepted an athletic scholarship to attend the University of Florida, where he played for coach Urban Meyer and coach Will Muschamp's Florida Gators football teams from 2010 to 2013.

As a true freshman in 2010, Easley played sparingly, playing in six games and totaling four tackles. In 2011, he started all 12 regular-season games, before suffering a torn ACL against Florida State. He recorded a total of 37 tackles on the season, finishing tied for fifth on the team with 7.5 tackles for a loss. In 2012, he played in and started eleven games, missing two games due to injury. He collected 26 tackles on the season, including 8.5 tackles for a loss and a team leading four quarterback sacks, while adding a fumble recovery. In 2013, Easley's senior season was cut short after tearing his ACL in practice leading up to the Kentucky game.[5] He totaled five tackles, including two for a loss.

On September 30, 2013, just a few days after it was reported he would miss the rest of the college football season, Easley announced he would forgo his remaining eligibility and enter the NFL Draft.[6]

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 1 34 in
(1.87 m)
288 lb
(131 kg)
4.93 s 26 reps
All values from NFL Combine[7]

New England Patriots

Easley was selected by the New England Patriots in the first round (29th overall) of the 2014 NFL Draft.[8] The team signed him to a four-year contract on June 23, 2014.[9] According to Ian Rapoport, the contract is for $7.3 million.[10]

On September 7, 2014, Easley played in his first NFL regular season game, a 33–20 road loss to the Miami Dolphins.[11] He would record his first career interception (off former Patriot Matt Cassel) the following week during a 30–7 win over the Minnesota Vikings.[12] On December 17, the Patriots placed Easley on injured reserve.[13] In 11 games of his rookie season, Easley finished with 9 tackles, 1 sack, 1 pass defended, and 1 interception.

Without Easley, the Patriots won Super Bowl XLIX after they defeated the defending champion Seattle Seahawks 28–24.

After the departure of longtime starter Vince Wilfork, Easley began the 2015 season as one of the Patriots' starting defensive tackles. On December 15, 2015, the Patriots placed Easley on injured reserve once again, ending his season.[14] He ended the season with 15 tackles and two sacks.[15]

In an unexpected move, the Patriots released Easley on April 13, 2016.[16]

Los Angeles Rams

On May 17, 2016, Easley signed a one-year contract with the Los Angeles Rams after working out with the team.[17] He played in all 16 games for the Rams in 2016, recording 35 tackles, 3.5 sacks, one pass deflected and two forced fumbles.

On March 7, 2017, the Rams placed an original round (first-round) tender on Easley.[18] On May 4, 2017, Easley signed his tender with the Rams.[19] During training camp, Easley suffered a torn ACL, his fourth in his football career and second time in the NFL; he was then ruled out for the 2017 season.[20][21]

On March 19, 2018, Easley signed a one-year contract to remain with the Rams.[22] On October 3, 2018, Easley was placed on injured reserve after undergoing another knee surgery.[23] Without Easley, the Rams reached Super Bowl LIII where they lost 13-3 to Easley's former team New England Patriots.

Personal life

Easley's mother is of Haitian descent.[24]

Dominique has one older brother David Easley and one younger sister Destinee Easley who is a student at the New York Film Academy in Burbank, CA.

Easley is a Muslim. He declared on his Twitter account that he converted to Islam on March 13, 2015.[25]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Hamilton: Easley surprisingly commits to Florida". ESPN.com. January 2, 2010. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  2. ^ "PSAL Burough Championships - Staten Island - Track & Field Meet". Athletic.net. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  3. ^ "PSAL City Champs - Complete (Raw)". MileSplit New York. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  4. ^ "Dominique Easley - Football Recruiting - Player Profiles - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  5. ^ "Florida's Dominique Easley is out for the rest of the season". CBSSports.com. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  6. ^ "Florida's Dominique Easley tears ACL, will enter 2014 NFL draft". Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  7. ^ http://www.draftscout.com/ratings/dsprofile.php?pyid=107048&draftyear=2014&genpos=DT
  8. ^ Gray, Jeff (May 9, 2014). "NFL Draft results 2014: Dominique Easley selected by Patriots at No. 29". SBNation.com. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  9. ^ "Patriots sign first-round draft pick DL Dominique Easley; Sign OL Chris Martin". New England Patriots. June 23, 2014. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  10. ^ "Ian Rapoport on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  11. ^ "Dominique Easley: Game Logs at NFL.com". www.nfl.com. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  12. ^ "Patriots vs. Vikings - Box Score - September 14, 2014 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  13. ^ "Patriots place DL Dominique Easley on injured reserve; Sign TE Steve Maneri". New England Patriots. December 17, 2014. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  14. ^ "Tom E. Curran on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  15. ^ "New England Patriots on Yahoo! Sports - News, Scores, Standings, Rumors, Fantasy Games". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  16. ^ "Patriots release former first-round pick Dominique Easley". CSNNE.com. April 13, 2016. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  17. ^ Reiss, Mike (May 17, 2016). "Dominique Easley signs with the Los Angeles Rams". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 17, 2016.
  18. ^ Simmons, Myles (March 7, 2017). "Rams Tender Restricted FA Easley". TheRams.com.
  19. ^ Alper, Josh (May 4, 2017). "Dominique Easley signs RFA tender". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com.
  20. ^ Orr, Conor (August 2, 2017). "Dominique Easley out for 2017 after suffering torn ACL". NFL.com.
  21. ^ Lago, Kristen (August 4, 2017). "Rams Sign Two Players, Waive Laskey". TheRams.com.
  22. ^ Simmons, Myles (March 19, 2018). "Rams, Dominique Easley Agree to Terms on One-Year Deal". TheRams.com.
  23. ^ "Rams Waive K Sam Ficken, Move Easley to I.R." TheRams.com. October 2, 2018.
  24. ^ Jett, Tyler (2011). "Child's Play: Often misunderstood, Easley refuses to hide personality". Retrieved February 24, 2015.
  25. ^ https://twitter.com/DominiqueEasley/status/576475323182678017

External links

2010 Florida Gators football team

The 2010 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 2010 college football season. The Gators competed in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and played their home games at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus. The season was the sixth and final campaign for coach Urban Meyer, who led the Gators to a 37–24 Outback Bowl victory over coach Joe Paterno's Penn State Nittany Lions, and an overall win-loss record of 8–5 (.615).

2011 Florida Gators football team

The 2011 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 2011 college football season. The Gators competed in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They played their home games at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus, and were led by first-year head coach Will Muschamp. Muschamp coached the Gators to a third-place finish in the SEC East, a 3–5 conference record, a 24–17 Gator Bowl victory over the Ohio State Buckeyes, and an overall win-loss record of 7–6 (.539).

2012 Florida Gators football team

The 2012 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 2012 college football season. The Gators competed in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and played their home games at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus. The 2012 season was the Gators' second under head coach Will Muschamp. They finished the season with 11–2 overall, 7–1 SEC. The team was invited to the 2013 Sugar Bowl, where they lost to the Louisville Cardinals, 33–23.

2013 Florida Gators football team

The 2013 Florida Gators football team represented the University of Florida in the sport of American football during the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Gators competed in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They played their home games at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus, and the 2013 season was the Gators' third under head coach Will Muschamp. The Gators finished the season with a 4–8 overall win-loss record, and finished 3–5 in the SEC and in fifth place in the SEC Eastern Division. They failed to become bowl eligible for the first time since 1990, and had their first losing season since 1979.

2014 New England Patriots season

The 2014 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 45th season in the National Football League, the 55th overall and the 15th under head coach Bill Belichick.

The 2014 season would mark the ten-year anniversary of the Patriots third and most recent Super Bowl win, when they defeated the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl XXXIX. Despite their championship drought, Belichick’s Patriots remained historically dominant throughout much of the 2000s/2010s. They qualified for the playoffs nine times (missing only the 2008 postseason), reached the AFC Championship five times, appeared in two Super Bowls and, in the eyes of many, solidified Tom Brady’s status as one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time. In 2007, the Patriots completed just the second undefeated regular season in the history of the modern NFL (the first being their division rival Miami Dolphins in 1972), as well as the first since the league expanded its seasons to sixteen games (though only the '72 Dolphins were able to win the Super Bowl). It was achievements such as these that made the Patriots a particularly intriguing media target. A miserable loss in week four against the Kansas City Chiefs, where New England dropped to 2-2, frequent off-field antics of tight-end Rob Gronkowski and highly publicized Deflategate scandal were all important chronicles of the 2014 Patriots’ wild season, the latter of which would ultimately result in the four-game suspension of Brady for the beginning of the 2016 NFL season. Despite all this, the Patriots managed to emerge victorious in the end.

The Patriots finished 12–4 for the third straight year, winning their sixth straight AFC East title, as well as the top-overall seed and home field advantage for the AFC playoffs. With their seeding, New England was awarded a first-round bye in the playoffs for the fifth season in a row, the first such occurrence for any team since the league switched to a 12-team playoff format in 1990 (surpassing the 1992–95 Dallas Cowboys). They finished fourth in the NFL in scoring (468 points) and eighth in points allowed (313), and first in point differential (with an average margin of victory of 9.7 points).

The Patriots defeated the Baltimore Ravens 35–31 in the Divisional Round of the playoffs, advancing to their fourth straight AFC Championship game. There, they defeated the Indianapolis Colts 45–7 to advance to their 8th Super Bowl, their 6th under Bill Belichick. On February 1, 2015, the Patriots played the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX. After tying the game 14–14 at halftime and falling behind ten points in the third quarter, the Patriots rallied in the final quarter of the game to secure a 28–24 lead. The win secured their fourth championship in franchise history. The game is widely considered by many to be one of the greatest Super Bowls ever played.

2017 Los Angeles Rams season

The 2017 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 80th season in the National Football League, the 81st overall, the 51st in the Greater Los Angeles Area and the first under new head coach Sean McVay as well as a new coaching staff. The Rams improved on their 4–12 record from the previous season. With a win over the Arizona Cardinals, the Rams ended a decade-long drought and clinched their first winning season since 2003 and first playoff appearance since 2004, when the club was based in St. Louis. The team played a game in London, England at Twickenham Stadium against the Arizona Cardinals in Week 7 as one of the NFL London Games.

For the second consecutive year, the Rams started out in first place in the NFC West with a 3–1 record. The Los Angeles Rams also scored 107 points in the first three games of the season, the second highest in franchise history and a league leader. Furthermore, the team went from being dead last in total offense the previous season with an NFL-low 224 points to becoming the highest scoring team in the league in 2017 with an average of 29.9 points per game and 478 total points scored - tops in both categories. On Christmas Eve, the Rams defeated the Tennessee Titans 27–23 in a Super Bowl XXXIV rematch to clinch the NFC West for the first time since 2003 and their first playoff berth since 2004. This was also their first division title as the Los Angeles Rams since the 1985 season. Their promising season came to a end as they were defeated by the No. 6 seed and defending NFC Champions, the Atlanta Falcons, 13–26 in the Wild Card Round. Coincidentally in the Rams' last playoff game in 2005, they were also beaten by the Falcons.

2019 Los Angeles Rams season

The 2019 Los Angeles Rams season will be the franchise's 82nd season in the National Football League, their 83rd overall, their 53rd in the Greater Los Angeles Area and their third under head coach Sean McVay. It will also mark the Rams' final season playing their home games at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, as the team will move into Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park in Inglewood beginning with the 2020 season. They will enter the season looking to bounce back after their Super Bowl LIII loss to the New England Patriots.

Curtis High School

Curtis High School, operated by the New York City Department of Education, is one of seven public high schools located in Staten Island, New York City, New York. It was founded on February 9, 1904, the first high school on Staten Island.

Eric Martin (linebacker)

Eric Martin (born July 21, 1991) is a Canadian football defensive end for the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League. He played college football at Nebraska.

Garrett Gilbert

Garrett Antone Gilbert (born July 1, 1991) is an American football quarterback for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL). Regarded as one of the best high school quarterbacks of his class, he played college football at Texas and SMU and was selected by the St. Louis Rams in the sixth round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He is the son of former NFL quarterback Gale Gilbert.

Gilbert initially saw little playing time as a professional and was primarily assigned to the offseason and practice and squads of his teams during his first five seasons in the NFL. He came to prominence as the starting quarterback of the Orlando Apollos of the Alliance of American Football (AAF) in 2019 where he led the league in yards and passer rating and helped his team obtain a league-best 7-1 record and playoff berth. After the AAF suspended operations before the scheduled conclusion of the season, Gilbert signed with the Browns.

Josh Kline

Josh Kline (born December 29, 1989) is an American football offensive guard for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Kent State.

List of Florida Gators in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Florida Gators football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Haitian Americans

This is a list of notable Haitian Americans, including both original immigrants who obtained American citizenship and their American descendants.To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Haitian American, or have references showing they are Haitian American and are notable.

List of Los Angeles Rams players

The following is a list of notable past players of the Los Angeles Rams, formerly the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams.

List of New England Patriots first-round draft picks

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in the Greater Boston metropolitan area. They are a member of the American Football Conference East Division (AFC East). The team began as the Boston Patriots in the American Football League, which merged with the National Football League in 1970. In 1971, the team relocated to Foxborough, where they became the New England Patriots. Since its establishment in 1960, the franchise has selected 64 players in the first round, five of these being the first overall pick.

The NFL Draft, which is officially known as the "Player Selection Meeting", is held each April. The draft is used as the primary means to distribute newly available talent (primarily from college football) equitably amongst the teams. Selections are made in reverse order based on the previous season's record, i.e., the club with the worst record from the previous season selects first. Through 2009, only two exceptions were made to this order: the Super Bowl champion always selects last (32nd), and the Super Bowl loser second to last (31st). Beginning in 2010, teams making the playoffs have been seeded in reverse order depending upon how far they advance. The draft consists of seven rounds. Teams have the option of trading selections for players, cash and/or other selections (including future year selections). Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades. The Patriots traded their first-round pick six times (1972, 1974, 2000, 2009, 2013, and 2017). In 2016, their first-round pick was stripped as punishment for the Deflategate incident.Gerhard Schwedes, a running back from Syracuse, was the first player to be drafted to the Patriots team. He was selected third overall in the 1960 American Football League Draft. Jim Plunkett, a quarterback from Stanford, was the Patriots' first selection in the 1971 NFL Draft. The Patriots have selected first overall five times, drafting Jack Concannon in 1964, Plunkett in 1971, Kenneth Sims in 1982, Irving Fryar in 1984, and Drew Bledsoe in 1993. The team has selected third overall once and fourth overall three times. Through 2017, two Patriots first-round draft picks have been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Hannah and Mike Haynes. Twenty Patriots first-round draft picks have been selected for the Pro Bowl. The team's most recent first-round draft pick was Malcom Brown, a defensive tackle from the University of Texas.

Mr. Two Bits

George Edmondson Jr. (born 1922) is a retired insurance salesman from Tampa, Florida who is known to the University of Florida community as "Mr. Two Bits". Edmondson is a long-time fan of — and unofficial cheerleader for — the Florida Gators football team, for which he led a traditional "Two Bits' cheer at football games from 1949 until his "retirement" at the conclusion of the Gators' 2008 season.Beginning with the 2009 season, a series of University of Florida students and famous alumni have taken over the Mr. Two Bits role during pregame festivities at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. Edmondson's cheer and distinctive orange and blue striped tie has also been used by the university as a symbol of alumni support.

New England Patriots

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in the Greater Boston area. The Patriots compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Gillette Stadium in the town of Foxborough, Massachusetts, which is located 21 miles (34 km) southwest of downtown Boston, Massachusetts and 20 miles (32 km) northeast of downtown Providence, Rhode Island. The Patriots are also headquartered at Gillette Stadium.

An original member of the American Football League (AFL), the Patriots joined the NFL in the 1970 merger of the two leagues. The team changed its name from the original Boston Patriots after relocating to Foxborough in 1971. The Patriots played their home games at Foxboro Stadium from 1971 to 2001, then moved to Gillette Stadium at the start of the 2002 season. The Patriots' rivalry with the New York Jets is considered one of the most bitter rivalries in the NFL.

Since the arrival of head coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady in 2000, the Patriots have since become one of the most successful teams in NFL history, winning 16 AFC East titles in 18 seasons since 2001, without a losing season in that period. The franchise has since set numerous notable records, including most wins in a ten-year period (126, in 2003–2012), an undefeated 16-game regular season in 2007, the longest winning streak consisting of regular season and playoff games in NFL history (a 21-game streak from October 2003 to October 2004), and the most consecutive division titles won by a team in NFL history (ten straight division titles from 2009 to 2018). The team owns the record for most Super Bowls reached (nine) and won (six) by a head coach–quarterback tandem, most Super Bowl appearances overall (eleven), tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers for the most Super Bowl wins (six), and also tied with the Denver Broncos for the most Super Bowl losses (five).

Steve Maneri

Steve Maneri (born March 20, 1988) is a former American football tight end. He played college football at Temple and was signed as an undrafted free agent by the Houston Texans in 2010.

He has played for the Kansas City Chiefs, Chicago Bears, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, New England Patriots and New York Jets.

Trey Burton

Lawrence Godfrey Burton III, known professionally as Trey Burton, (born October 29, 1991) is an American football tight end for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Florida and was signed by the Philadelphia Eagles as an undrafted rookie free agent in 2014.

Los Angeles Rams current roster
Active roster
Free agents

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