Division of North Sydney

The Division of North Sydney is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. It was proclaimed in 1900 and was one of the original 65 divisions contested at the first federal election.

Located along Sydney's Lower North Shore, the division is named after the suburb of North Sydney. It also includes the suburbs of Artarmon, Cammeray, Castlecrag, Crows Nest, Greenwich, Henley, Hunters Hill, Huntleys Cove, Huntleys Point, Kirribilli, Lane Cove, Lane Cove North, Lane Cove West, Lavender Bay, Linley Point, Longueville, McMahons Point, Middle Cove, Milsons Point, Naremburn, North Willoughby, Northbridge, Northwood, Riverview, St Leonards, Tarban, Waverton, Willoughby, Willoughby East, Wollstonecraft, and Woolwich; as well as parts of Chatswood, Chatswood West, Cremorne, Gladesville, Gore Hill, and Neutral Bay.

Second only to the nearby Division of Wentworth, the Division of North Sydney has the nation's second highest proportion (56.4%) of high income families.[1] As with all North Shore seats, the division has usually been a comfortably safe seat for the Liberal Party of Australia and its predecessors. Labor has usually run dead in this seat, though it came within 3.1 percent of winning it at the 1943 election landslide. North Sydney and Wentworth are the only two federation divisions in New South Wales to have never been held by Labor. It has been held by a member of a non-Labor party for all but six years of its existence, when held by "father of the independents" Ted Mack, from the 1990 election before choosing to resign from federal parliament after two terms at the 1996 election, for the same reason he previously chose to resign from state parliament after two terms − to avoid receiving a parliamentary pension.[2]

However, during Mack's tenure, North Sydney was always a safe Liberal seat in traditional two-party matchups, and it was a foregone conclusion that it would revert to the Liberals once Mack retired. As expected, when Mack retired in 1996, Joe Hockey reclaimed the seat for the Liberals on a swing large enough to revert the seat to its traditional status as a comfortably safe Liberal seat. Hockey held it easily until 2015, serving as Treasurer from 2013 to 2015 in the Abbott Government. After Abbott was ousted as Liberal leader and Prime Minister by Malcolm Turnbull in the September 2015 Liberal leadership spill Hockey moved to the backbench, however six days later he announced his intention to resign from parliament, taking effect from 23 October. The 2015 North Sydney by-election occurred on 5 December to elect his replacement, Trent Zimmerman, a former Hockey staffer, despite a large swing.[3][4]

Zimmerman won with 48.2 percent of the primary vote after a larger-than-predicted 12.8 percent swing against the Turnbull Coalition Government. This was only the second time in North Sydney since federation that the successful Liberal candidate did not obtain a majority of the primary vote and had to rely on preferences. Zimmerman faced a double-digit primary vote swing − more than triple that of the 2015 Canning by-election − even though Labor did not even contest the seat.[1]

The Liberal two-candidate vote of 60.2 percent against independent Stephen Ruff compares to the previous election vote of 65.9 percent against Labor.[1] The reduction of 5.7 percent cannot be considered a "two-party/candidate preferred swing" − when a major party is absent, preference flows to both major parties does not take place, resulting in asymmetric preference flows.[5][6]

Zimmerman became the first openly LGBTI member of the House of Representatives.[3][7]

Besides Mack and Hockey, other notable members from this seat include Dugald Thomson, a minister in the Reid Government, and Billy Hughes, the longest-serving parliamentarian in Australian history and a minister in the Lyons, Menzies and Fadden governments.

North Sydney
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of NORTH SYDNEY 2016
Division of North Sydney in New South Wales, as of the 2016 federal election.
Created1901
MPTrent Zimmerman
PartyLiberal Party
NamesakeNorth Sydney, New South Wales
Electors107,404 (2016)
Area53 km2 (20.5 sq mi)
DemographicInner Metropolitan

Members

Member Party Term
  Dugald Thomson Free Trade, Anti-Socialist 1901–1909
  Commonwealth Liberal 1909–1910
  George Edwards Commonwealth Liberal 1910–1911
  (Sir) Granville Ryrie Commonwealth Liberal 1911–1917
  Nationalist 1917–1922
  Billy Hughes Nationalist 1922–1929
  Independent Nationalist 1929
  Australian 1929–1931
  United Australia 1931–1944
  Independent 1944–1945
  Liberal 1945–1949
  William Jack Liberal 1949–1966
  Bill Graham Liberal 1966–1980
  John Spender Liberal 1980–1990
  Ted Mack Independent 1990–1996
  Joe Hockey Liberal 1996–2015
  Trent Zimmerman Liberal 2015–present

Election results

Australian federal election, 2016: North Sydney[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Trent Zimmerman 47,614 51.49 −9.42
Labor Peter Hayes 15,537 16.80 −3.22
Greens Arthur Chesterfield-Evans 12,036 13.02 −2.50
Independent Stephen Ruff 11,829 12.79 +12.79
Christian Democrats Sharon Martin 1,894 2.05 +1.08
Science James Coffey 1,629 1.76 +1.76
Liberal Democrats Daniel Leahy 1,289 1.39 +1.39
Family First Eddy Ku 649 0.70 +0.70
Total formal votes 92,477 95.24 +0.59
Informal votes 4,623 4.76 −0.59
Turnout 97,100 90.71 −1.54
Two-party-preferred result
Liberal Trent Zimmerman 58,825 63.61 −2.10
Labor Peter Hayes 33,652 36.39 +2.10
Liberal hold Swing −2.10

References

  1. ^ a b c 2015 North Sydney by-election: Antony Green ABC
  2. ^ Independents' 'father' says trio will choose ALP: ABC AM 6 September 2010
  3. ^ a b Gartrell, Adam (December 5, 2015). "Liberal Trent Zimmerman wins North Sydney byelection despite swing". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved December 6, 2015.
  4. ^ Osborne, Paul (2015-10-26). "Zimmerman wins North Sydney preselection". Yahoo 7 News. Retrieved 2015-10-28.
  5. ^ "A Comment on the Size of the Port Adelaide Swing, Antony Green". Blogs.abc.net.au. 2012-02-13. Retrieved 2012-07-26.
  6. ^ An Example of Non-Monotonicity and Opportunites [sic] for Tactical Voting at an Australian Election: Antony Green ABC 4 May 2011
  7. ^ When an election’s not a battle but a limp formality: Daily Telegraph 26 November 2015
  8. ^ North Sydney, NSW, Virtual Tally Room 2016, Australian Electoral Commission.

External links

Coordinates: 33°48′58″S 151°11′02″E / 33.816°S 151.184°E

2015 North Sydney by-election

A by-election for the Australian House of Representatives seat of North Sydney was held on 5 December 2015 from 8 am to 6 pm AEDT.The trigger for the by-election was the 23 October parliamentary resignation of Joe Hockey, the backbench Liberal Member for North Sydney and former Abbott Coalition Government Treasurer.House of Representatives Speaker Tony Smith issued the writ for the by-election on 26 October. The electoral roll containing 104,352 electors closed on 2 November. Candidate nominations closed on 12 November, and the draw of the ballot paper order occurred on 13 November.The by-election was won by Liberal candidate Trent Zimmerman, a former Hockey staffer, whose pre-selection had been controversial. Zimmerman won with 48.2 percent of the primary vote after a larger-than-predicted 12.8 percent swing against the Turnbull Coalition Government. This was only the second time in North Sydney's history that the successful Liberal candidate did not obtain a majority of the primary vote and had to rely on preferences. Zimmerman faced a double-digit primary vote swing − more than triple that of the 2015 Canning by-election − despite the absence of a Labor candidate. Labor have never been successful in the safe Liberal seat.The Liberal two-candidate vote of 60.2 percent against independent Stephen Ruff compares to the previous election vote of 65.9 percent against Labor. The reduction of 5.7 percent cannot be considered a "two-party/candidate preferred swing" − when a major party is absent, preference flows to both major parties does not take place, resulting in asymmetric preference flows.Ian Macfarlane attempted to defect from the Liberal party room to the National party room with accompanying demands for additional Nationals cabinet representation, and the Mal Brough James Ashby diary controversy deepened in the last week of the campaign. Along with the unexpected by-election swing and Turnbull's significantly lessened personal ratings in the concurrent December Newspoll, some News Corp journalists opined Malcolm Turnbull's honeymoon to be over.Zimmerman became the first openly-LGBTI member of the House of Representatives.

Alan Jones (radio broadcaster)

Alan Belford Jones AO (born 13 April 1941, or possibly 1942 or 1943) is an Australian radio broadcaster. He is a former coach of the Australia national rugby union team and rugby league coach and administrator. He has worked as a school teacher, a speech writer in the office of the Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, and in musical theatre. He has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Queensland, and completed a one-year teaching diploma at Worcester College, Oxford. He has received civil and industry awards.

Jones hosts a popular Sydney breakfast radio program, on radio station 2GB. Jones advocates mainly conservative views, and the popularity of his radio program has made him a highly paid and influential media personality in Australia. Despite his success, he remains a controversial figure. His on-air conduct has received adverse findings from Australia's media regulators, and he has frequently been sued for defamation.

Division of Bendigo

The Division of Bendigo is an Australian Electoral Division in the state of Victoria. The division was created in 1900 and was one of the original 65 divisions contested at the first federal election. It is named for the city of Bendigo.

The division is situated on the northern foothills of the Great Dividing Range in North Central Victoria. It covers an area of approximately 6,255 square kilometres (2,415 sq mi) and provides the southern gateway to the Murray Darling Basin. In addition to the city of Bendigo, other large population centres in the division include Castlemaine, Heathcote, Kyneton and Woodend.The current Member for the Division of Bendigo, since the 2013 federal election, is Lisa Chesters, a member of the Australian Labor Party.

Division of Wentworth

The Division of Wentworth is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. It was proclaimed in 1900 and was one of the original 65 divisions contested at the first federal election. The division is named after William Charles Wentworth (1790–1872), an Australian explorer and statesman. In 1813 he accompanied Blaxland and Lawson on their crossing of the Blue Mountains.

Wentworth is the second-smallest geographical electoral division in the Parliament with an area of just 38 square kilometres (15 sq mi), covering Woolloomooloo along the southern shore of Sydney Harbour to Watsons Bay and down the coast to Clovelly—an area largely coextensive with Sydney's Eastern Suburbs. The western boundary runs along Oxford Street, Flinders Street and South Dowling Street, then eastward along Alison Road to Randwick Racecourse and Clovelly Beach. It includes the suburbs of Bellevue Hill, Ben Buckler, Bondi, Bondi Beach, Bondi Junction, Bronte, Centennial Park, Darling Point, Double Bay, Dover Heights, Edgecliff, Moore Park, North Bondi, Paddington, Point Piper, Queens Park, Rose Bay, Rushcutters Bay, Tamarama, Vaucluse, Watsons Bay, Waverley, and Woollahra; as well as parts of Clovelly, Darlinghurst, East Sydney, Elizabeth Bay, Kings Cross, Potts Point, and Randwick.

Historically considered a safe seat for the Liberal Party of Australia, Wentworth is one of only two original federation divisions in New South Wales, along with the Division of North Sydney, which have never been held by the Australian Labor Party, though Labor candidate Jessie Street came within 1.6 percent of winning Wentworth at the 1943 election landslide. The electorate is the nation's wealthiest, contains the nation's largest Jewish population and contains the nation's fifth-largest number of same-sex couples.The previous member for Wentworth since the 2004 election was Malcolm Turnbull, Prime Minister of Australia from September 2015 until August 2018. Both Turnbull and a previous member John Hewson had been Opposition Leaders, with both taking the leadership of the Liberal Party in their respective second terms as members for Wentworth.

In August 2018, a challenge by Peter Dutton led to two Liberal leadership spills. Following the second spill on 24 August 2018, Treasurer Scott Morrison defeated Dutton in a leadership ballot. Turnbull did not nominate as a candidate, and immediately resigned as Prime Minister. On 31 August 2018 Turnbull resigned from Parliament, triggering a 2018 Wentworth by-election, which was won by independent candidate Kerryn Phelps.

Electoral results for the Division of North Sydney

This is a list of electoral results for the Division of North Sydney in Australian federal elections from the electorate's creation in 1901 until the present.

Greenwich, New South Wales

Greenwich is a suburb on the Lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Greenwich is located 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Municipality of Lane Cove.

The suburb occupies a peninsula on the northern side of Sydney Harbour, at the opening of the Lane Cove River. The suburb features harbour views, a few pockets of bushland, shops, restaurants, cafes and a harbour swimming pool with shark net.

Hunters Hill, New South Wales

Hunters Hill is a suburb on the Lower North Shore and Northern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Hunters Hill is located nine kilometres (five point six miles) north-west of the Sydney central business district and is the administrative centre for the local government area of the Municipality of Hunter's Hill.

Hunters Hill is situated on a small peninsula that separates the Lane Cove and Parramatta rivers. It can be reached by bus or by ferry.

Joe Hockey

Joseph Benedict Hockey (born 2 August 1965) is the Ambassador of Australia to the United States. He is a former Australian politician, the Member of Parliament for North Sydney from 1996 until 2015. He was the Treasurer of Australia in the Abbott Government from 18 September 2013 until September 2015 when he resigned from Cabinet, having refused an alternative offer from the incoming Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull. He previously served as the Minister for Human Services and Minister for Employment and Workplace Relations in the Howard Government.

Hockey's parliamentary resignation triggered a 2015 North Sydney by-election where he was succeeded by Trent Zimmerman who had previously worked for Hockey as a staffer. His appointment as Ambassador of Australia to the United States was announced on 8 December 2015 to replace Kim Beazley, whose term ended in early 2016, and he assumed that position on 29 January 2016.

Julie Owens

Julie Ann Owens (born 17 October 1958) is an Australian politician who has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian House of Representatives since October 2004, representing the Division of Parramatta, New South Wales.

List of Australian electorates contested at every election

Of the 65 federal electoral divisions first contested at the 1901 election, 34 are still in existence without ever being abolished. These are referred to as Federation Divisions, with the Australian Electoral Commission's redistribution guidelines stating that "Every effort should be made to retain the names of original federation divisions".

The Division of Riverina was abolished in 1984 and re-created in 1993, so has not been contested at every election.

Although there were 75 members in the House of Representatives in 1901, there were only 65 divisions contested as the states of South Australia and Tasmania consisted of single multi-member divisions electing 7 and 5 members respectively.In the state parliaments:

In New South Wales, there is only one of the original 34 contested in 1856 that still exists.

In Victoria, three of the original 37 contested in 1856 still exist.

In Queensland there is only one of the original 16 contested in 1860.

In South Australia there is also only one of the original 17 contested in 1856.

In Western Australia, five of the original 30 contested in 1890 still exist.

In the Northern Territory, there are nine of the original 19 contested in 1974.

In both Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory none still exist.

Longueville, New South Wales

Longueville is a suburb on the Lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 8 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Municipality of Lane Cove.

Longueville is a small residential suburb on the peninsula between Tambourine Bay and Woodford Bay, on the banks of the Lane Cove River. Originally a home to manufacturing industries, the suburb had its beginnings as a residential area in the 1870s. Longueville was officially proclaimed a suburb in the 1920s.Before settlement, Longueville was the home of the Cam-mer-ray-gal people of the Ku-ring-gai Aboriginal Tribe. Today the suburb is home to some of Australia's most expensive real estate, with the Sydney Morning Herald ranking it as Sydney's fourth most-expensive suburb.

Norman Lethbridge Cowper

Sir Norman Lethbridge Cowper, (15 September 1896 – 9 September 1987) was an Australian lawyer best known as the Senior Partner of the legal firm of Allen Allen & Hemsley which is now Allens. Under Cowper's leadership, Allen Allen & Hemsley became one of Australia's leading law firms working for many of Australia's biggest corporations and expanded into Asia. His most notable work as a lawyer was his involvement in the successful fight by 11 trading banks against the Chifley Government's bank nationalisation legislation. He was knighted for his contribution to public affairs in 1967.

He also twice stood for Parliament as a candidate of the United Australia Party and was involved in drafting its constitution. Cowper served on the boards of 20 Australian public companies including Borg Warner Australia and Angus & Robertson.

North Sydney

North Sydney may refer to:

North Sydney Council, a local government area in Sydney

North Sydney, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney, Australia

Division of North Sydney, an electoral division serving the suburb

North Sydney Bears, a professional rugby league football club of North Sydney, NSW

North Sydney Cricket Club

North Sydney Oval, a multi-use sporting facility in North Sydney, NSW

North Sydney, Nova Scotia, a region of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality in Canada

Thomas Dickson Archibald

Thomas Dickson Archibald (8 April 1813 – 18 October 1890) was a Canadian businessman and politician.

Born in Onslow, Nova Scotia, Archibald had by the early 1830s established himself as businessman in the area surrounding Sydney, on Cape Breton Island. In 1854 he was appointed to a seat on the Legislative Council of Nova Scotia, upon the recommendation of William Young. He retained this position until Canadian Confederation in 1867. On 23 October 1867, he was appointed to the Senate of Canada by royal proclamation, where he sat as a Liberal-Conservative representing the senatorial division of North Sydney until his death.

Woolwich, New South Wales

Woolwich is a suburb on the Lower North Shore and Northern Suburbs of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Woolwich is located 11 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Municipality of Hunter's Hill. Woolwich sits on the peninsula between the Lane Cove River and the Parramatta River, jutting out from Hunters Hill.

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