Discogs

Discogs (short for discographies) is a website and crowdsourced database of information about audio recordings, including commercial releases, promotional releases, and bootleg or off-label releases. The Discogs servers, currently hosted under the domain name discogs.com, are owned by Zink Media, Inc., and are located in Portland, Oregon, US.[3] While the site lists releases in all genres and on all formats, it is especially known as the largest online database of electronic music releases, and of releases on vinyl media. Discogs currently contains over 10.6 million releases, by over 5.3 million artists, across over 1.1 million labels, contributed from over 443,000 contributor user accounts — with these figures constantly growing as users continually add previously unlisted releases to the site over time.[4][5]

Discogs
Discogs logo
Type of site
Music
Available inEnglish (US), English (UK), German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, French
Headquarters
OwnerZink Media, Inc.
Created byKevin Lewandowski
IndustryInternet
ServicesDatabase, online shopping
RevenueAdvertisement (logging-in removes all ads), Marketplace Seller Fees
Websitediscogs.com
Alexa rankIncrease 472 (Global: January 2019)[1]
CommercialPartially
RegistrationOptional
Users443,637 (January 2019)[2]
LaunchedNovember 2000
Current statusOnline

History

The discogs.com domain name was registered on 30 August 2000,[6] and Discogs itself was launched in November 2000 by programmer, DJ, and music fan Kevin Lewandowski originally as a database of electronic music.[7]

The site's original goal was to build the most comprehensive database of electronic music, organized around the artists, labels, and releases available in that genre. In 2003 the Discogs system was completely rewritten,[8] and in January 2004 it began to support other genres, starting with hip hop. Since then, it has expanded to include rock and jazz in January 2005 and funk/soul, Latin, and reggae in October of the same year. In January 2006 blues and non-music (e.g. comedy records, field recordings, interviews) were added. Classical music started being supported in June 2007, and in October 2007 the "final genres were turned on" – adding support for the Stage & Screen, Brass & Military, Children's, and Folk, World, & Country music genres, allowing capture of virtually every single type of audio recording that has ever been released.

On 30 June 2004, Discogs published a report, which included information about the number of its contributors. This report claimed that Discogs had 15,788 contributors and 260,789 releases.[9]

On 20 July 2007 a new system for sellers was introduced on the site called Market Price History. It made information available to users who paid for a subscription – though 60 days information was free – access to the past price items were sold for up to 12 months ago by previous sellers who had sold exactly the same release. At the same time, the US$12 per year charge for advanced subscriptions was abolished, as it was felt that the extra features should be made available to all subscribers now that a better, some may say fairer, revenue stream had been found from sellers and purchasers. However, at the beginning of 2008, the Market Price History was also made free of charge for all users, still giving up to a 12-month view of historical sales data for any release.

Milestones

Discogs publishes information indicating the number of releases, labels, and artists presently in its database,[4] along with its contributors:[5]

Date Master Releases Releases Artists Labels Contributors Note
30 June 2004 none * 260,789 unknown unknown 15,788 By mid 2004 releases crossed the quarter million mark.
2006 none * 500,000+ unknown unknown unknown In 2006 releases passed the half million mark.
25 July 2010 unknown 2,006,878 1,603,161 169,923 unknown By mid 2010 releases crossed the 2m mark.
4 March 2014 unknown 4,698,683 3,243,448 576,324 185,283 By mid 2014 labels had crossed the half million mark.
11 June 2014 unknown 4,956,221 3,375,268 612,264 194,432 In mid 2014 releases were passing the 5m mark.
26 December 2014 unknown 5,505,617 3,638,804 680,131 215,337 By late 2014 contributors surpassed the 200k mark.
30 May 2015 unknown 6,001,424 3,874,147 743,267 237,967 By mid 2015 releases surpassed the 6m mark.
31 March 2016 1,001,012 7,005,177 4,455,198 892,271 281,579 By early 2016 releases surpassed the 7m mark, and master releases passed a million.
19 January 2017 1,120,336 8,049,341 4,854,378 1,014,930 329,366 By early 2017 releases surpassed the 8m mark,[10] and labels passed a million.
25 October 2017 1,254,825 9,083,017 5,182,134 1,091,609 379,527 By late 2017 releases surpassed the 9m mark,[11] and artists surpassed the 5m mark.
28 June 2018 1,377,906 10,000,000 5,284,282 1,143,442 418,140 On this date in 2018 releases surpassed the 10m mark.[12]

* Note: the Master Release function was made available from 30 April 2009.

Other projects

Discogs has so far created a further six online databases, for collating information on related topics.

VinylHub

In mid 2014, a side project website called VinylHub[13] was started, in order for users to add record shops and stores from around the world, with information concerning location, contact details, what type of items they stocked, et al.

Filmogs

In late 2014, the company released a new beta website called Filmogs.[14] Users can add their physical film collections (on DVD, Blu-ray, LaserDisc, or any other type of physical film release) to the database, and buy and sell film releases in the global marketplace.

Gearogs

Gearogs was launched as a beta in late 2014, at the same time as Filmogs.[15] The site lets users add and track music equipment, including items such as synths, drum machines, sequencers, samplers, audio software, and any other electronic music making equipment.

Bookogs

At the start of 2015, the company began Bibliogs as another beta project.[16] Users can submit information about their books, physical or electronic, different versions and editions, and also connect different credits (writers, illustrators, translators, publishers, etc.) to these books. 21,000 books were submitted by the end of 2016. The project was in beta phase until 15 August 2017[17] when it reached more than 31,000 book titles, and rebranded without explanation to Bookogs.com, because of legal issues with the old name Bibliogs, and removed 'Beta state' notice from the main page. The next day the 'Marketplace Beta' feature was presented.[18]

Comicogs

Comicogs[19] launched around the same time as Bookogs, as a means for comic collectors and enthusiasts to catalog their collections and create an archive of comic releases. Similar to Bookogs, users can contribute comics, manga, graphic novels, and strips to the database, along with information on credits, publishers, writers, etc. 18,000 comics were submitted by the start of 2018. The Comicogs marketplace was launched on 23 August 2017,[20] allowing users to buy and sell comics from across the world.

Posterogs

In September 2017, the company launched Posterogs.[21] Posterogs was the only Discogs site to launch a database and marketplace simultaneously.[22] The scope of Posterogs was left broad at the time of launch, with the company opting to let the community define what type of posters, flyers, or similar, should be included in the database. As users have contributed items to the database, while non-music related items are fully acceptable for inclusion, much of the primary focus seems to be music posters, such as gig/tour posters, album promo posters, and promotional flyers - which is in keeping with Discogs' music theme, though there are also many film posters in the database. As with all other databases, users can save posters to their 'Collection' and 'Wantlist', in addition to buying and selling in the marketplace.

API

In mid-August 2007, Discogs data became publicly accessible via a RESTful, XML-based API and a license that allowed specially attributed use, but did not allow anyone to "alter, transform, or build upon" the data.[23][24][25] The license has since been changed to a public domain one. Prior to the advent of this license and API, Discogs data was only accessible via the Discogs web site's HTML interface and was intended to be viewed only using web browsers.[26] The HTML interface remains the only authorized way to modify Discogs data.[24]

On 7 June 2011 version 2 of the API was released.[27] Notable in this release was that a license key was no longer required, the default response was changed from XML to JSON, and the 5000 queries per day limit was removed (although a limit of 2000 image lookups per days was introduced).

On 1 November 2011 a major update to version 2 of the API was released.[28] This new release dropped support for XML, data is always returned in JSON format, however the monthly data dumps of new data are only provided in XML format.

On 1 February 2014 Discogs modified their API so that image requests will now require OAuth authorization, requiring each user of third-party applications to have a Discogs "application ID", with image requests now limited to 1,000 per day. Additionally the Premium API service was dropped.[29]

On 24 June 2014 Discogs deprecated their XML API in lieu of a JSON-formatted API.[30]

Discogs also allows full XML downloads of its Release, Artist, and Label data through the data.discogs.com subdomain.

The recommendations API is not publicly available.[31]

Contribution system

The data in Discogs comes from submissions contributed by users who have registered accounts on the web site. The system has gone through four major revisions.

Version One (V1)

All incoming submissions were checked for formal and factual correctness by privileged users called "moderators", or "mods" for short, who had been selected by site management. Submissions and edits wouldn't become visible or searchable until they received a single positive vote from a "mod". An even smaller pool of super-moderators called "editors" had the power to vote on proposed edits to artist & label data.

Version Two (V2)

This version introduced the concept of "submission limits" which prevented new users from submitting more than 2-3 releases for moderation. The number of possible submissions by a user increased on a logarithmic scale. The purpose of this was two-fold: 1) it helped keep the submission queue fairly small and manageable for moderators, and 2) it allowed the new user to acclimatise themselves slowly with the many formatting rules and guidelines of submitting to Discogs. Releases required a number of votes to be accepted into the database - initially the number of votes required was from 4 different moderators but in time the amount was decreased to 3 and then 2.

Version Three (V3)

V3 launched in August 2007. Submission limits were eliminated, allowing each user to submit an unlimited number of updates and new entries. New releases added to the database were explicitly marked as "Unmoderated" with a top banner, and updates to existing items, such as releases, artists, or labels, were not shown (or available to search engines or casual visitors) until they were approved by the moderators.[32]

Version Four (V4)

This system launched on 10 March 2008. New submissions and edits currently take effect immediately. Any time a new release is added or old release edited, that entry becomes flagged as needing "votes" (initially, "review," but this term caused confusion). A flagged entry is marked as a full yellow bar across a release in the list views and, like version three, a banner on the submission itself – although, initially, this banner was omitted.

Any item can be voted on at any time, even if it isn't flagged. Votes consist of a rating of the correctness & completeness of the full set of data for an item (not just the most recent changes), as assessed by users who have been automatically determined, by an undisclosed algorithm, to be experienced & reliable enough to be allowed to cast votes. An item's "average" vote is displayed with the item's data.[33]

The ranking system has also changed in v4. In v3, rank points were only awarded to submitters when a submission was "Accepted" by moderator votes. While in v4, rank points are now awarded immediately when a submission is made, regardless of the accuracy of the information and what votes it eventually receives, if any.[34]

Discogs-aware metadata software

Tag editors

  • ASMT MP3 Tagger – single release tagger
  • foobar2000freeware media player and music management software with a plugin
  • Helium Music Manager – music management software with a plugin
  • Jaikozshareware OS X/Windows/Linux spreadsheet-based tag editor
  • Kid3 – open-source project, tagger for all common music formats
  • Mp3tag – freeware tag editor, batch and spreadsheet interfaces
  • OrangeCD Catalog – music management software
  • puddletag – a free and open-source tag editor written for PyQt
  • taghycardia[35] – freeware, automated MP3 tagger
  • Tagog – Linux audio file tagger
  • TagScanner[36] – freeware tag editor with Discogs, FreeDB, TrackType.org support
  • The GodFather – freeware tag editor
  • The Tagger – MP3 and AAC formats tag editor for OS X
  • TigoTago – spreadsheet-based tag editor

Other

  • MP3 Filenamer – online MP3 file name generator, based on Discogs release data
  • Discogs Bar – Discogs navigation and search control toolbar for Firefox
  • Album Art Downloader – Discogs cover art downloads
  • WWW::Discogs – Perl module for interfacing with the Discogs API
  • XLD (X Lossless Decoder) – a CD ripper and audio file converter for OS X
  • Music Collector – Music database software by collectorz.com

See also

References

  1. ^ "Discogs.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2019-01-04.
  2. ^ "Discogs contributors". Discogs.com. 4 January 2019. Retrieved 4 January 2019.
  3. ^ "Whois discogs.com". www.whois.com. Retrieved 2019-02-18.
  4. ^ a b "Explore on Discogs". Discogs. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Discogs Contributors". Discogs.com. 28 June 2018. Retrieved 28 June 2018. contributor#: 418,140
  6. ^ "DisCogs.com WHOIS, DNS, & Domain Info - DomainTools". WHOIS. 2016. Retrieved 2016-02-09.
  7. ^ Carnes, Richard (26 March 2010). "Discogs: Vinyl revolution". Resident Advisor. Retrieved 15 October 2010.
  8. ^ "What/Why v2.0". Discogs.com. Archived from the original on 22 June 2004. Retrieved 2 October 2008.
  9. ^ "Discogs". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original on 29 June 2004. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
  10. ^ SoLil (7 January 2017). "8 Million Releases In The Discogs Database!". blog.discogs.com. Discogs.com. Retrieved 19 January 2017.
  11. ^ SoLil (4 October 2017). "Discogs Music Database Reaches 9 Million Releases". blog.discogs.com. Discogs.com. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  12. ^ Moon_Ray (29 June 2018). "Discogs Reaches 10 Million Releases In The Database". blog.discogs.com. Discogs.com. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  13. ^ "VinylHub". vinylhub.com. Discogs.com.
  14. ^ "Filmogs". filmo.gs. Discogs.com.
  15. ^ "Gearogs". gearogs.com. Discogs.com.
  16. ^ "Bibliogs". bookogs.com. Discogs.com.
  17. ^ "Bibliogs is Now Bookogs". bookogs.com. Discogs.com. 15 August 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  18. ^ "The Bookogs Marketplace is here! Start Selling Books Online". blog.discogs.com. Discogs.com. 16 August 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  19. ^ "Comicogs". comicogs.com. Discogs.com.
  20. ^ "Start Selling Comics on Comicogs! New Marketplace Launched". comicogs.com. Discogs.com. 23 August 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  21. ^ "Posterogs". posterogs.com. Discogs.com. 6 September 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  22. ^ "Track Your Poster Collection; Buy and Sell on Posterogs!". posterogs.com. Discogs.com. 6 September 2017. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  23. ^ Lewandowski, Kevin (August 2007). "Open Data + API". Discogs (Discogs News forum post). Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  24. ^ a b Lewandowski, Kevin (August 2007). "Discogs Data License". Discogs. Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  25. ^ Lewandowski, Kevin (August 2007). "Discogs API Documentation". Discogs. Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  26. ^ "Terms of service changes". Discogs (forum thread). 15 June 2005. Retrieved 27 August 2007.
  27. ^ "API v2.0". Discogs. 7 June 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2012.
  28. ^ "API v2.0 Improvements". Discogs. 1 November 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2012.
  29. ^ "API Changes". Discogs. 1 January 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  30. ^ "API Changelog". Discogs. 24 June 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2015.
  31. ^ "Discogs API Documentation". Discogs. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  32. ^ "Discogs News - Discogs Version 3 - Part 1". Discogs. Retrieved 16 February 2011.
  33. ^ Lewandowski, Kevin (February 2008). "Restructuring of Moderation/Voting System". Discogs. Retrieved 17 March 2008.
  34. ^ Various (October 2008). "Fastest grown user". Discogs. Retrieved 29 August 2008.
  35. ^ "taghycardia - mp3 folders and tags normalizer". Tag Hycardia. taghycardia.info.
  36. ^ Sergey Serkov. "TagScanner - Многофункциональный редактор тэгов" [Multi-tag editor]. XD Lab (in Russian).

External links

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Andy Hill (composer)

Andrew Gerard Hill (born 1957 in Bracknell, Berkshire, England) is an English record producer and songwriter, who was involved in creating many hits during the 1980s and 1990s. He is most famous for his work with Bucks Fizz and Celine Dion.

On many of his compositions he was partnered by lyricist Peter Sinfield, who had formerly worked with King Crimson. He has been nominated for an Ivor Novello Award on seven occasions, and has won the award twice in the category "Best Song Musically and Lyrically" and once for "Songwriter of the Year". He also composed the winning song in the 1981 Eurovision Song Contest.

Atom Heart Mother

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The cover was designed by Hipgnosis, and was the first one to not feature the band's name on the cover, or contain any photographs of the band anywhere. This was a trend that would continue on subsequent covers throughout the 1970s and beyond.

Although it was commercially successful on release, the band, particularly Waters and David Gilmour, have expressed several negative opinions of the album in more recent years. Nevertheless, it remained popular enough for Gilmour to perform the title track with Geesin in 2008.

Barrett Strong

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He was born in West Point, Mississippi.

Basshunter

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He recorded four studio albums: LOL (2006), Now You're Gone – The Album (2008), Bass Generation (2009) and Calling Time (2013). In addition to his own music, he has written and produced for a large number of artists. He also took part in the seventh series of Celebrity Big Brother, the Swedish Fångarna på fortet and the British Weakest Link in 2010.

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Dick Hyde (musician)

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Hugh Masekela

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I'm in the Mood for Love

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I've Got a Crush on You

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It is considered a jazz standard, primarily of the vocal repertoire, thanks to recordings by singers such as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald. Instrumental versions have also been recorded by Nat Adderley, Ike Quebec and others.

I Really Don't Want to Know

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Interstellar Overdrive

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Like Someone in Love

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Midge Ure

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Tony Hiller

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