Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland

Nord-Hålogaland (Norwegian: Nord-Hålogaland bispedømme) is a diocese in the Church of Norway. It covers the Church of Norway churches in Troms and Finnmark counties as well as in the territory of Svalbard. The diocese is seated in the city of Tromsø at the Tromsø Cathedral, the seat of the presiding bishop, Olav Øygard (bishop since 2014).[2]

Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland

Nord-Hålogaland bispedomme
TromsoDomkirkeFraRWithsPlass
View of the Tromsø Cathedral
Location
CountryNorway
TerritoryFinnmark and Troms
DeaneriesTromsø domprosti, Alta, Hammerfest, Indre Finnmark, Indre Troms, Nord-Troms, Senja, Trondenes, Varanger
Statistics
Parishes66
Members190,926
Information
DenominationChurch of Norway
Established1952
CathedralTromsø Cathedral
Current leadership
BishopOlav Øygard
Map
Location of the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland

Location of the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland
Website
http://www.kirken.no/nord-haalogaland
Reference[1]

History

Originally, this area was a part of the great Diocese of Nidaros, which covered all of Northern Norway from Romsdalen and north (present-day Finnmark, Troms, and Nordland counties). On 30 December 1803, the King of Norway named Peder Olivarius Bugge the "Bishop of Trondheim and Romsdal" and also named Mathias Bonsach Krogh the "Bishop of Nordland and Finnmark", thus essentially splitting the diocese into two starting in 1804, although legally it was one diocese with two bishops. The newly appointed Bishop Krogh (in 1804) made Alstahaug Church the seat of his bishopric in the north, while Bishop Bugge stayed in Trondheim. The new diocese was legally created on 14 June 1844 as Tromsø stift and it was to be seated in the city of Tromsø. The new Tromsø Cathedral was completed in 1864. The name of the diocese was changed to Hålogaland bispedømme in 1918. When Svalbard became part of Norway in 1920, it also became a part of this diocese. In 1952, the Diocese of Hålogaland was split into two: the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland (Nordland county) and the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland (Troms, Finnmark, and Svalbard).

Bishops

Per Oskar Kjølaas
Former Bishop Per Oskar Kjølaas

The Bishops of the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland since its creation in 1952 when it was split off from the Diocese of Hålogaland:

Cathedral

Construction of the new Tromsø Cathedral began in 1861. It was designed by architect Christian Heinrich Grosch. The cathedral was built of wood in Neo-Gothic style. The interior is dominated by the altar, a copy of the Resurrection by Adolph Tidemand.[3]

Structure

The Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland is divided into nine deaneries (Norwegian: prosti). Each one corresponds to several municipalities in the diocese. Each municipality is further divided into one or more parishes which each contain one or more congregations. See each municipality below for lists of churches and parishes within them.

Deanery (prosti) Municipalities
Tromsø domprosti Tromsø, Karlsøy, Svalbard
Alta prosti Alta, Hasvik, Loppa
Hammerfest prosti Gamvik, Hammerfest, Kvalsund, Lebesby, Måsøy, Nordkapp
Indre Finnmark prosti Karasjok, Kautokeino, Nesseby, Tana, Porsanger
Indre Troms prosti Balsfjord, Bardu, Lavangen, Målselv, Salangen
Nord-Troms prosti Kvænangen, Kåfjord, Lyngen, Nordreisa, Skjervøy, Storfjord
Senja prosti Berg, Dyrøy, Lenvik, Sørreisa, Torsken, Tranøy
Trondenes prosti Gratangen, Harstad, Ibestad, Kvæfjord, Skånland
Varanger prosti Berlevåg, Båtsfjord, Sør-Varanger, Vadsø, Vardø

Media gallery

Domkirken i Tromso innvendig

Interior
Tromsø Cathedral

Tromsø domkyrkje

Side entrance
Tromsø Cathedral

Tromsø domkyrkje2

Front
Tromsø Cathedral

References

  1. ^ Store norske leksikon. "Nord-Hålogaland bispedømme" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  2. ^ "Velkommen til Nord-Hålogaland bispedømme!" (in Norwegian). Nord-Hålogaland bispedømme. Archived from the original on 2013-02-22. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  3. ^ "Tromsø Cathedral".

External links

Coordinates: 69°36′N 19°30′E / 69.6°N 19.5°E

Andørja Church

Andørja Church (Norwegian: Andørja kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Ibestad Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Engenes on the northwestern tip of the island of Andørja. It is the church for the Andørja parish which is part of the Trondenes prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1914 by the architect S. Kristensen. The church seats about 325 people.

Berg Church (Berg)

Berg Church (Norwegian: Berg kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Berg Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Skaland. It is the main church for the Berg parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, stone church was built in a long church style in 1955 by the architect Hans Magnus. The church seats about 225 people.The altarpiece carved in wood was decorated by Torvald Kildal Moseid (1917-2000). Moseid also designed the stained glass in the church. The organ is a pneumatic organ from Vestre Orgelfabrikk. The church bell is from Olsen Nauen Bell Foundry (Olsen Nauen Klokkestøperi).

Brøstad Church

Brøstad Church (Norwegian: Brøstad kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Brøstadbotn. It is an annex church for the Dyrøy parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1937. The church seats about 180 people. In 1987, the church was renovated by the architects Bersvend Toresen Elvevold, M. Jakobsen, and O. Holtermann.

Diocese of Hålogaland

The Diocese of Hålogaland (Norwegian: Hålogaland bispedømme, historically: Tromsø stift) was a diocese in the Church of Norway. The Diocese covered the Lutheran Church of Norway churches located within all of Northern Norway (including Nordland, Troms, and Finnmark county along with the territory of Svalbard). The diocese was headquartered in the city of Tromsø at the Tromsø Cathedral. The diocese was dissolved in 1952 when it was split into the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland and the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland.

Dyrøy Church

Dyrøy Church (Norwegian: Dyrøy kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Holm on the eastern shore of the island of Dyrøya. It is the main church for the Dyrøy parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1880 by the architect Håkon Mosling. The church seats about 450 people.

Finnsæter Chapel

Finnsæter Chapel (Norwegian: Finnsæter kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Berg Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Finnsæter. It is an annex chapel for the Berg parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1982 by the architecture company Ric. Bjørn A/S. The chapel seats about 77 people. The chapel was consecrated on 29 August 1982 by the Bishop Arvid Nergård.

Fjordgård Chapel

Fjordgård Chapel (Norwegian: Fjordgård kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Fjordgård on the northern part of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1976 by the architectural firm Rik. Bjørn A/S. The church seats about 110 people.

Flakstadvåg Chapel

Flakstadvåg Chapel (Norwegian: Flakstadvåg kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Torsken Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Flakstadvåg on the west coast of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Torsken parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1925 by the architect . The chapel seats about 150 people.

Husøy Chapel

Husøy Chapel (Norwegian: Husøy kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located on the island-village of Husøy, just off the coast of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wood and brick chapel was built in a long church style in 1957. The chapel seats about 100 people.

Lenvik Church

Lenvik Church (Norwegian: Lenvik kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Bjorelvnes, along the Gisundet strait. It is one of the churches in the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a cruciform style in 1879 by the architect Anker. The church seats about 250 people.

Lysbotn Chapel

Lysbotn Chapel (Norwegian: Lysbotn kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Lysnes on the eastern side of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a fan-shaped style in 1970 by the architect Gaute Baalsrud. The chapel seats about 120 people.

Medby Chapel

Medby Chapel (Norwegian: Medby kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Torsken Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Medby on the west coast of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Torsken parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1937. The chapel seats about 170 people.

Mefjordvær Chapel

Mefjordvær Chapel (Norwegian: Mefjordvær kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Berg Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Mefjordvær on the northern coast of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Berg parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1916 by the architect Ludvig Lorentzen. The chapel seats about 120 people.

Rossfjord Church

Rossfjord Church (Norwegian: Rossfjord kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located just northeast of the village of Rossfjordstraumen, along the coast of the Malangen fjord. It is one of the churches in the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was originally built in a cruciform style in 1822 by an unknown architect in Lenvik as Lenvik Church. When a new Lenvik Church was constructed, this building was taken down and moved to its present location in 1885. The church seats about 250 people.

Sandbakken Chapel

Sandbakken Chapel (Norwegian: Sandbakken kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Dyrøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Sandbakken on the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Lenvik parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1976 by the architect Torgeir Renland. The chapel seats about 148 people.

Skrolsvik Chapel

Skrolsvik Chapell (Norwegian: Skrolsvik kapell) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tranøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Skrollsvika on the southwest coast of the island of Senja. It is an annex chapel for the Tranøy parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden church was built in a long church style in 1924. The church seats about 170 people.

Skøelv Chapel

Skøelv Chapel (Norwegian: Skøelv kapell) is a chapel of the Church of Norway in Sørreisa Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Skøelva. It is an annex chapel for the Sørreisa parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The white, wooden chapel was built in a long church style in 1966 by the architect Petter Bratli. The chapel seats about 100 people.

Torsken Church

Torsken Church (Norwegian: Torsken kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Torsken Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Torsken on the west coast of the island of Senja. It is the main church for the Torsken parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The red, wooden church was built in a cruciform style in 1784 by an unknown architect. The church seats about 100 people.

Vangsvik Chapel

Vangsvik Chapel (Norwegian: Vangsvik kapell) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tranøy Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the village of Vangsvik. It is an annex church for the Tranøy parish which is part of the Senja prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The concrete church was built in a fan-shaped design in 1975 by the architect Alf Apalseth. The church seats about 150 people.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.