Diocese of Hålogaland

The Diocese of Hålogaland (Norwegian: Hålogaland bispedømme, historically: Tromsø stift) was a diocese in the Church of Norway. The Diocese covered the Lutheran Church of Norway churches located within all of Northern Norway (including Nordland, Troms, and Finnmark county along with the territory of Svalbard). The diocese was headquartered in the city of Tromsø at the Tromsø Cathedral. The diocese was dissolved in 1952 when it was split into the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland and the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland.[1]

Diocese of Hålogaland

Hålogaland bispedomme
85670 Tromsø domkirke kirkested
View of the Tromsø Cathedral
Location
CountryNorway
TerritoryNordland, Finnmark,
Troms, and Svalbard
Information
DenominationChurch of Norway
Established1804—1952
CathedralTromsø Cathedral
Map
The diocese included the areas of both Nord-Hålogaland and Sør-Hålogaland in the map.

The diocese included the areas of both Nord-Hålogaland and Sør-Hålogaland in the map.

History

Originally, this area was a part of the great Diocese of Nidaros, which covered all of Norway from Romsdalen north. On 30 December 1803, the King of Norway named Peder Olivarius Bugge the "Bishop of Trondheim and Romsdal" and also named Mathias Bonsach Krogh the "Bishop of Nordland and Finnmark", thus essentially splitting the diocese into two (but legally it was one diocese with two bishops). The new Bishop Krogh made Alstahaug Church the seat of his bishopric in the north, while Bishop Bugge stayed in Trondheim at the Nidaros Cathedral. The new diocese in the north was formally established on 14 June 1844 as Tromsø stift and it was to be seated in the city of Tromsø. Work on a new cathedral was begun soon after. The new Tromsø Cathedral was completed in 1864. The name of the diocese was changed to Hålogaland bispedømme in 1918. In 1952, the Diocese of Hålogaland was split into two: the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland (which covered Nordland county) and the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland (which included Troms and Finnmark county and Svalbard).

Bishops

Below is a list of the bishops of Hålogaland during its whole existence.

References

  1. ^ Store norske leksikon. "Hålogaland bispedømme" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2012-02-03.
Alf Wiig

Alf Kristian Theodor Wiig (24 August 1891 – 10 July 1974) was a Norwegian bishop in the Church of Norway.

Wiig was born in Kristiansund, Norway. He served as vicar in Karasjok from 1923 to 1934 and in Sortland from 1934 to 1945. He was then the dean of Finnmark from 1945 until 1951 and he was the dean of Tromsø Cathedral from 1951 until 1952. In 1952, he became the first bishop of the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland, a position he held until 1961. He died on 10 July 1974.

Bø Church (Nordland)

Bø Church (Norwegian: Bø kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Bø Municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is located in the village of Bø i Vesterålen. It is the church for the Bø og Malnes parish which is part of the Vesterålen prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland. The red, wooden church was built in a cruciform style in 1824 by an unknown architect. The church seats about 370 people.

Daniel Bremer Juell

Daniel Bremer Juell (1 January 1808 – 26 May 1855) was a Norwegian clergyman and politician.

Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland

Nord-Hålogaland (Norwegian: Nord-Hålogaland bispedømme) is a diocese in the Church of Norway. It covers the Church of Norway churches in Troms and Finnmark counties as well as in the territory of Svalbard. The diocese is seated in the city of Tromsø at the Tromsø Cathedral, the seat of the presiding bishop, Olav Øygard (bishop since 2014).

Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland

Sør-Hålogaland is a diocese in the Church of Norway. The Diocese covers the Lutheran Church of Norway churches located within Nordland county in Norway. The diocese is headquartered in the town of Bodø at Bodø Cathedral, the seat of the presiding Bishop Ann-Helen Fjeldstad Jusnes (since 2015). The diocese is divided into eight deaneries (prosti).

Eivind Berggrav

Eivind Josef Berggrav (25 October 1884 – January 14, 1959) was a Norwegian Lutheran bishop. As Primate of the Church of Norway (Norwegian:Preses i Bispemøtet i Den norske kirke), Berggrav became known for his unyielding resistance against the Nazi occupation of Norway during World War II.

Berggrav also became an important figure in 20th-century ecumenical movement and served as president of the United Bible Societies.

Elverhøy Church

Elverhøy Church (Norwegian: Elverhøy kirke) is a parish church of the Church of Norway in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. It is located in the city of Tromsø. It is the church for the Elverhøy parish which is part of the Tromsø domprosti (arch-deanery) in the Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland. The church was built in its current location in 1974 and it now seats about 435 people.

Gustav Dietrichson

Gustav Johan Fredrik Dietrichson (8 April 1855 – 19 March 1922) was a Norwegian theologian and priest. He served as bishop of both the Diocese of Hålogaland and the Diocese of Hamar.Dietrichson was born in the state of Wisconsin. His parents, Gustav Fredrik Dietrichson (1813–1886) and Pauline Christine Sørine Alette Henriette Preus (1819–1900) were Norwegian immigrant to the United States. He came for a clerical family. His maternal uncle, Adolph Carl Preus (1814–1878), had immigrant from Norway in 1850. Preus served as the first President of the Norwegian Synod prior to returning to Norway in 1870 where he served as vicar of Tvedestrand and Holt in Aust-Agder until his death.Dietrichson himself moved to Norway where he received his Cand.theol. degree from the University of Oslo in 1878. He was the parish priest in Stor-Elvdal from 1887 until 1897 and in Bodø from 1897 until 1910. In 1910, he was named Bishop of Tromsø stift. The name was changed to the "Diocese of Hålogaland" in 1918. Later in 1918, he became the new bishop for the Diocese of Hamar, the position he held until his death in 1922 in Hamar.

Hans Gabrielsen

Hans Julius Gabrielsen (8 January 1891–10 March 1965) was a Norwegian jurist and politician for the Liberal Party. He is best known as County Governor of Finnmark and County Governor of Oppland, as well as Consultative Councillor of State for Finnmark Affairs in 1945.

Gabrielsen played a central role in organizing the civilian side of Norwegian war effort in Northern Norway during the 1940 Norwegian Campaign. After the end of that campaign he led the Norwegian attempts at retaining some of their armed forces outside German control, before being arrested by the Germans and placed in concentration camp. After the war Gabrielsen became a cabinet member and led the early reconstruction efforts in the northernmost parts of Norway.

Johan Nicolai Støren

Johan Nicolai Støren (22 July 1871 – 14 November 1956) was a Norwegian bishop and theologian.

Kolbjørn Varmann

Kolbjørn Sigurd Werner Varmann (23 December 1904 – 13 August 1980) was a Norwegian priest and politician for the Labour Party. He is known as Minister of Transport and Communications from 1955 to 1960, and also as County Governor of Finnmark.

Mathias Bonsach Krogh

Mathias Bonsach Krogh (4 October 1754 – 2 September 1828) was a Norwegian clergyman who served as the first Bishop of the Diocese of Hålogaland. Krogh was also a member of the first ordinary Parliament of Norway.

Sigurd Johan Normann

Sigurd Johan Normann (1879—1939) was a Norwegian theologian and bishop of the Church of Norway. He was the Bishop for the Diocese of Hålogaland from 1937 until his death in 1939.

Normann was born in 1879 in Hamarøy, Norway. He received his cand.theol. degree in 1909 from the Faculty of Theology at the University of Oslo. He received his Doctor of Theology degree in 1935. He worked as a priest at the Johannes Church in Oslo from 1911 until 1918. From 1918 until 1937, he was the priest for the Grønland Church in Oslo. In 1937, he was named the Bishop of the Diocese of Hålogaland, based in Tromsø, a position he held until his death in December 1939.

Tromsø

Tromsø (Norwegian pronunciation: [²trʊmsœ] (listen); Northern Sami: Romsa; Finnish: Tromssa; Kven: Tromssa) is a municipality in Troms county, Norway. The administrative centre of the municipality is the city of Tromsø. Outside Norway, Tromso and Tromsö are alternative spellings of the name.

Tromsø lies in Northern Norway. The 2,521-square-kilometre (973 sq mi) municipality is the 18th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway. Tromsø is the 9th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 75,638. The municipality's population density is 30.6 inhabitants per square kilometre (79/sq mi) and its population has increased by 15.9% over the last decade. It is the largest urban area in Northern Norway and the third largest north of the Arctic Circle anywhere in the world (following Murmansk and Norilsk). Most of Tromsø, including the city centre, is located on the island of Tromsøya, 350 kilometres (217 mi) north of the Arctic Circle. In 2017, the city of Tromsø had a population of about 65,000 people spread out over Tromsøya and parts of Kvaløya and the mainland. Tromsøya is connected to the mainland by the Tromsø Bridge and the Tromsøysund Tunnel, and to the island of Kvaløya by the Sandnessund Bridge.

The municipality is warmer than most other places located on the same latitude, due to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Tromsø is even milder than places much farther south of it elsewhere in the world, such as on the Hudson Bay and in Far East Russia, with the warm-water current allowing for both relatively mild winters and tree growth in spite of its very high latitude.

The city centre of Tromsø contains the highest number of old wooden houses in Northern Norway, the oldest house dating from 1789. The city is a cultural centre for its region, with several festivals taking place in the summer. Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge of the electronica duo Röyksopp and Lene Marlin grew up and started their careers in Tromsø. Noted electronic musician Geir Jenssen also hails from Tromsø.

Tromsø (city)

Tromsø (Norwegian pronunciation: [²trʊmsœ] (listen); Northern Sami: Romsa; Finnish: Tromssa; Kven: Tromssa) is a city in Tromsø Municipality in Troms county, Norway. The city is the administrative centre of the municipality as well as the administrative centre of Troms county. The Diocese of Nord-Hålogaland is and its Bishop are based at the Tromsø Cathedral in the city. The city is located on the island of Tromsøya which sits in the Tromsøysundet strait, just off the mainland of Northern Norway. The mainland suburb of Tromsdalen is connected to the city centre on Tromsøya by the Tromsø Bridge and the Tromsøysund Tunnel. The suburb of Kvaløysletta on the island of Kvaløya is connected to the city centre by the Sandnessund Bridge.

The 21.25-square-kilometre (5,250-acre) town has a population (2017) of 64,448 which gives the town a population density of 3,033 inhabitants per square kilometre (7,860/sq mi). The city centre (on Tromsøya) has a population of 38,980. The mainland borough of the city, Tromsdalen, has a population of 16,787 and the suburb of Kvaløysletta on the island of Kvaløya has a population of 8,681. The most populous town north of Tromsø in Norway is Alta, with a population of 15,094 (2017), making Tromsø a very large city for this vast rural northern part of Norway. It is the largest urban area in Northern Norway and the third largest north of the Arctic Circle anywhere in the world (following Murmansk and Norilsk).

The city's largest workplaces are the University of Tromsø (UiT) and University Hospital of North Norway. The Norwegian Polar Institute also has its headquarters in Tromsø. The Northern Lights Observatory was established in 1928, and two companies affiliated with the Kongsberg Gruppen collect satellite data from space using the observatory. The fishing industry is very important. Norway's Norges Råfisklag and Norges sjømatråd (seafood council) both have their headquarters in Tromsø. Sparebanken Nord-Norge also has its headquarters in the city. Furthermore, "Skatt nord", an agency of the Norwegian Tax Administration is based here too.

The city is warmer than most other places located on the same latitude, due to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream. Tromsø is even milder than places much farther south of it elsewhere in the world, such as on the Hudson Bay and in Far East Russia, with the warm-water current allowing for both relatively mild winters and tree growth in spite of its very high latitude.

The city centre of Tromsø contains the highest number of old wooden houses in Northern Norway, the oldest house dating from 1789. The city is a cultural centre for its region, with several festivals taking place in the summer. Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge of the electronica duo Röyksopp and Lene Marlin grew up and started their careers in Tromsø. Noted electronic musician Geir Jenssen also hails from Tromsø.

Wollert Krohn-Hansen

Wollert Krohn-Hansen (28 December 1889—3 April 1973) was a Norwegian theologian and pastor. He was the Bishop of the Diocese of Hålogaland from 1940 until 1952, and was instrumental in dividing it into two smaller dioceses. After the division of the diocese, he was appointed as the first Bishop of the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland from 1952 until his retirement in 1959.

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