Dick Wildung

Richard Kay "Dick" Wildung (August 16, 1921 – March 15, 2006) was an American football tackle in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers. Wildung attended the University of Minnesota, where he was a two-time consensus All-American as a tackle following the 1941 and 1942 seasons. He served in World War II as a Navy lieutenant on a PT boat in the Pacific Ocean from 1943 through 1945.

Wildung was drafted in the first round of the 1943 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers and played with the team from 1946–51 and in 1953. He played in the Pro Bowl following the 1951 season.[1]

In 1957, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and in 1973 he was inducted into the Packers Hall of Fame.

Dick Wildung
refer to caption
Wildung on a 1950 Bowman football card
No. 45
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:August 16, 1921
Scotland, South Dakota
Died:March 15, 2006 (aged 84)
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:221 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school:Luverne (MN)
College:Minnesota
NFL Draft:1943 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Dick Wildung". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 23, 2016.

External links

1941 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1941 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season.

1941 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1941 Big Ten Conference football season was the 46th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1941 college football season.

The 1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, led by head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a perfect 8–0 record, led the conference in both scoring offense and scoring defense, was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, and won the program's second consecutive national championship. Halfback Bruce Smith was a consensus All-American and won the 1941 Heisman Trophy. Tackle Dick Wildung was also a consensus first-team All-American.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 147 to 41, and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Bob Westfall was selected as a consensus first-team player on the 1941 College Football All-America Team.

Ohio State, under head coach Paul Brown, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 167 to 110, and was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll.

1941 College Football All-America Team

The 1941 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1941. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1941 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Harvard center Endicott Peabody, who won the 1941 Knute Rockne Award, was the only player to be unanimously named to the first team of all nine official selectors. Dick Wildung of Minnesota and Bob Westfall of Michigan each received eight official first-team designations. Bruce Smith of Minnesota won the 1941 Heisman Trophy and received seven official first-team nominations.

1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season. In their tenth year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled an undefeated 8–0 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 186 to 38.The team was selected national champion by eleven NCAA-designated major selectors in Associated Press, Billingsley, Boand, DeVold, Dunkel, Football Research, Helms, Litkenhous, National Championship Foundation, Poling, Sagarin, Sagarin (ELO-Chess).Halfback Bruce Smith was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, INS, Time-Life, United Press (UP), Associated Press (AP) and Look Magazine. Smith was also awarded the Heisman Trophy, the only Golden Gopher to win the award.Tackle Dick Wildung was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, INS, Time Life, AP and UPI. Wildung, Smith, halfback Bill Daley, end Bob Fitch and guard Len Levy were named All-Big Ten.Back Bob Sweiger was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 239,227, which averaged to 47,845. The season high for attendance was against Northwestern.

1942 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1942 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1942 Big Ten Conference football season. Dave Schreiner was the only unanimous pick with 18 points (representing all nine first-team picks); Julius Franks and Dick Wildung followed with 17 points each.

1942 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1942 Big Ten Conference football season was the 47th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1942 college football season.

The 1942 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, led by head coach Paul Brown, compiled a 9–1, led the Big Ten in scoring offense (33.7 points per game), won the conference championship, and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll. The Buckeyes' only loss was by a 17–7 score against Wisconsin at Camp Randall Stadium. Tackle Charles Csuri received the team's most valuable player award. Halfback Les Horvath went on to win the 1943 Heisman Trophy.

Wisconsin, under head coach Harry Stuhldreher, compiled an 8–1–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points per game allowed), and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. The Badgers played Notre Dame to a 7–7 and suffered its sole loss on the road against Iowa. End Dave Schreiner was a consensus first-team All-American and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 7–3 record and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. Two Michigan linemen, tackle Al Wistert and guard Julius Franks (Michigan's first African-American All-American), were selected as consensus first-team All-Americans.

1942 College Football All-America Team

The 1942 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1942. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1942 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Look magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Two individuals were unanimous selections; they were Georgia halfback (and Heisman Trophy winner) Frank Sinkwich and Wisconsin end Dave Schreiner.

1942 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1942 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1942 Big Ten Conference football season. In their first year under head coach George Hauser, the Golden Gophers compiled a 5–4 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 152 to 91.Tackle Dick Wildung was named an All-American by the Walter Camp Football Foundation, Associated Press, Stern, Collier's/Grantland Rice, Look Magazine. Wildung was also named All-Big Ten first team.Dick Wildung was awarded the Team MVP Award.The Gophers hosted the U.S. Navy Pre-Flight school at the University of Iowa. The Pre-Flight team was coached by Bernie Bierman, who had coached the Golden Gophers to five national titles between 1934 and 1941, and resumed coaching the Golden Gophers in 1945.Total attendance for the season was 231,307, which averaged to 38,551. The season high for attendance was against Michigan.

1947 All-Pro Team

The 1947 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players who were chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team for the 1947 football season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), Pro Football Illustrated, and the New York Daily News (NYDN). The AP selections included players from the National Football League (NFL) and All-America Football Conference; the UP, PFI, and NYDN selections were limited to players from the NFL.

1949 All-Pro Team

The 1949 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1949 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), and the New York Daily News.

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