Dick Voris

Richard J.Voris (January 25, 1922 – December 26, 2008) was an American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at the University of Virginia from 1958 to 1960, compiling a record of 1–29.

Dick Voris
Biographical details
BornJanuary 25, 1922
Los Angeles, California
DiedDecember 26, 2008 (aged 86)
Alma materSan Jose State University
Playing career
1947–1948San Jose State
Position(s)Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1952–1953Hartnell JC
1954Los Angeles Rams (assistant)
1955–1957Army (DL)
1958–1960Virginia
1961–1962Green Bay Packers (WR/TE)
1963–1967San Francisco 49ers (DL)
1968–1970St. Louis Cardinals (DL)
1971St. Louis Cardinals (DC/LB)
1972Detroit Lions (LB)
1973Baltimore Colts (DC/LB)
1974–1975New York Jets (DC/LB)
1976Tampa Bay Buccaneers (LB)
Head coaching record
Overall1–29 (college)
20–0–1 (junior college)

Coaching career

Voris was named head coach of the Virginia Cavaliers football program on February 11, 1958.[1] In his three seasons at the helm, the Cavaliers went 1–29. That mark included a 28-game losing streak, then an NCAA major-college record. His only win came against Duke with a score of 15–12. He resigned shortly after the conclusion of the 1960 season, on December 9.[2]

Following his stint at Virginia, Voris was hired by the Green Bay Packers of the NFL. From 1961 to 1962, he served as the teams director of player personnel and also as an assistant on Vince Lombardi's staff, coaching the ends. During that period the Packers won two league championships.

He was also an assistant coach with the San Francisco 49ers and at San Jose State.

Voris graduated from Salinas Junior College (later Hartnell) in 1942. After coaching his James Lick High School to a championship, he brought nine players from the San Jose area and two from his previous coaching job in Hanford to join Salinas Valley area players.

In his two seasons at Hartnell, his teams compiled a 20–0–1 record.

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Virginia Cavaliers (Atlantic Coast Conference) (1958–1960)
1958 Virginia 1–9 1–5 8th
1959 Virginia 0–10 0–5 8th
1960 Virginia 0–10 0–6 8th
Virginia: 1–29 1–16
Total: 1–29

References

  1. ^ "Voris Is Named To Coaching Job At Virginia". The Free Lance–Star. February 12, 1958. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
  2. ^ UPI (December 11, 1960). "Voris Gets Freedom Plus Pay". The Daytona Beach News-Journal. Retrieved 28 March 2012.
1958 Virginia Cavaliers football team

The 1958 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. The Cavaliers were led by first-year head coach Dick Voris and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in last.

1959 Virginia Cavaliers football team

The 1959 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1959 NCAA University Division football season. The Cavaliers were led by second-year head coach Dick Voris and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in last. Virginia finished without a win and extended their losing streak to 18 games.

1960 Virginia Cavaliers football team

The 1960 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season. The Cavaliers were led by third-year head coach Dick Voris and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, finishing in last. Virginia finished without a win for the second consecutive year and extended their losing streak to 28 games, tying the NCAA record set between 1945 and 1948 by the Kansas State Wildcats. Voris, who managed just one win in three seasons at Virginia, resigned as head coach at the end of the season.

1961 Green Bay Packers season

The 1961 Green Bay Packers season was their 43rd season overall and their 41st season in the National Football League. The club posted an 11–3 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference and ending a fifteen-year playoff drought. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 37–0 in the NFL Championship Game, the first title game ever played in Green Bay. This was the Packers 7th NFL league championship.

The 1961 season was the first in which the Packers wore their trademark capital "G" logo on their helmets.

1962 Green Bay Packers season

The 1962 Green Bay Packers season was their 44th season overall and their 42nd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 13–1 record under coach Vince Lombardi, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by defeating the New York Giants 16–7 in the NFL Championship Game, the Packers second consecutive defeat of the Giants in the championship game. This marked the Packers' eighth NFL World Championship.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1962 Packers as the fifth-greatest defense in NFL history, noting, "The great 1962 Packers had a rock-solid defense front to back, with five Hall of Famers: defensive linemen Willie Davis and Henry Jordan, linebacker Ray Nitschke, cornerback Herb Adderley, and safety Willie Wood. (They also had 1962 All-Pro linebackers Dan Currie and Bill Forester.) Green Bay gave up just 10.8 points per game, shutting out opponents three times. The Packers held opposing QBs to a 43.5 rating, due, in part, to Wood's league-leading nine interceptions. The Packers' defense allowed the Giants 291 yards in the NFL championship game, but held the Giants offense scoreless as the Packers won, 16–7 (New York scored on a blocked punt)."

The Packers' +267 point differential (points scored vs. points against) in 1962 is the best total of any NFL team in the 1960s. Cold Hard Football Facts says that the 1962 Packers "may have been the best rushing team in the history of football. And that team etched in historic stone the image of Lombardi's three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust Packers that is still so powerful today."

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Voris is a Dutch surname, derived from Voorhees (surname). Notable people with the surname include:

Dick Voris, American football player and coach

Jeff Voris, American football coach

Michael Voris (born 1961), American Roman Catholic activist and apologist

Roy Marlin Voris (1919–2005), American aviator and World War II flying ace

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