Dick Stanfel

Richard Anthony Stanfel (July 20, 1927 – June 22, 2015) was an American football player and coach with a college and professional career spanning more than 50 years from 1948 to 1999. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a player in 2016. He was also named to the National Football League (NFL) 1950s All-Decade Team.

A native of San Francisco, Stanfel served in the United States Army and later played college football on both offense and defense at the University of San Francisco from 1948 to 1950. He was selected as a first-team All-Coast defensive guard in 1950.

Stanfel was selected by the Detroit Lions with the 19th pick in the 1951 NFL Draft, missed the 1951 season due to injury, and then played seven seasons as an offensive guard for the Detroit Lions from 1952 to 1955 and Washington Redskins from 1956 to 1958. He was a key offensive player on the Lions' 1952 and 1953 NFL championship teams and was named the Most Valuable Player on the 1953 team. He was selected by the Associated Press as a first-team All-NFL player in five of his seven NFL seasons and played in five Pro Bowls.

Stanfel also spent more than 35 years as a football coach, principally as an offensive line coach. His coaching career included stints with the Notre Dame Fighting Irish (1959–1962), California Golden Bears (1963), Philadelphia Eagles (1964–1970), San Francisco 49ers (1971–1975), New Orleans Saints (1976–1980, 1997-1998), and Chicago Bears (1981–1992). Bears head coach Mike Ditka called Stanfel the best offensive line coach in football after the Bears led the NFL in rushing three straight years and won Super Bowl XX.

Dick Stanfel
refer to caption
Stanfel on 1955 Bowman football card
No. 63, 60
Position:Offensive guard
Personal information
Born:July 20, 1927
San Francisco, California
Died:June 22, 2015 (aged 87)
Libertyville, Illinois
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:236 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school:San Francisco (CA) Commerce
College:San Francisco
NFL Draft:1951 / Round: 2 / Pick: 19
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Head coaching record
Regular season:1–3 (.250)
Player stats at PFR
Coaching stats at PFR

Early years

Stanfel was born in San Francisco in 1927 and attended the High School of Commerce there.[1] At Commerce, he played on the football team as a blocking back. He enrolled at San Francisco Junior College in the fall of 1946 and played football while changing his position to guard. After a year of junior college, Stanfel served as a signal corpsman in the United States Army for a year-and-a-half.[2]

After his military service, Stafel attended the University of San Francisco (USF) where he played college football from 1948 to 1950 on both offense and defense for the San Francisco Dons football team under head coach Joe Kuharich.[3] At USF, Stanfel was a blocker for Ollie Matson and a teammate of Gino Marchetti and Bob St. Clair. (All four went on to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.) At the end of the 1950 season, Stanfel was selected by the Associated Press as a first-team defensive guard on the All-Coast football team,[4] by the United Press as a first-team player on its independent conference all-star team,[5] and as a member of the west team in the East–West Shrine Game.[6] He was credited with opening numerous holes for Kyle Rote in the Shrine Game.[7]

Professional football

Detroit Lions

In January 1951, Stanfel was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round, 19th overall pick, of the 1951 NFL Draft. He was the first player drafted by head coach Buddy Parker after he became the Lions' head coach.[7] In August 1951, Stanfel was hit from the side in a scrimmage while practicing in Wisconsin for the Chicago College All-Star Game, seriously injuring his left knee.[3][8] As a result of the injury, Stanfel underwent knee surgery and did not play during the 1951 season.[9] Stanfel later recalled: "For a solid year I worked with weights, took exercises and swam to strengthen the knee."[3]

After recuperating from his knee injury, Stanfel made his NFL debut for the 1952 Detroit Lions, a team that compiled a 9–3 record, ranked second in the NFL with an average of 28.7 points scored per game, and defeated the Cleveland Browns in the 1952 NFL Championship Game. In November 1952, after the Lions rushed for a season-high 321 yards against the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Detroit Free Press published an article crediting Stanfel as a key to the running game. Assistant coach Aldo Forte said, "Stanfel's play at guard was the chief contribution to our great running game. He loves to play football and enjoys the game the rougher it gets."[10] George Wilson added: "We feel that Stanfel is one of the best, if not THE best offensive guard in pro football today. He's fast, rangy and can block extremely well. He not only holds the players out of there; he knocks them down and then goes hunting for more."[10]

In his second NFL season, Stanfel played for the 1953 Lions team that repeated as NFL champion, compiling a 10–2 record and again defeating the Browns in the 1953 NFL Championship Game. At the end of the 1953 regular season, the Lions players voted Stanfel as the team's most valuable player.[3] Assistant coach Forte in December 1953 called Stanfel the best guard in the NFL, and Stanfel said that the MVP honor was "the biggest thrill I've ever received in football."[3] He was also selected as a Pro Bowl player and was named a first-team All-NFL player by both the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP).[1]

In the spring of 1954, the Calgary Stampeders sought to lure Stanfel to the Canadian Football League with an offer to pay 20% more than his $7,000 salary with the Lions.[11] Stanfel instead signed a new contract with the Lions in May 1954 for an estimated salary of $8,500.[12] After a strong start to the 1954 season, Stanfel missed the last five games of the regular season with a back injury. In Stanfel's absence, the Lions lost to the Bears and played the Eagles to a tie. Stanfel returned to the lineup days before the NFL Championship Game. At the time of Stanfel's return, Lions head coach Buddy Parker called him "the best blocking back in the NFL."[13] The 1954 Lions compiled a 9–2–1 record and won the NFL Western Conference championship before losing to the Browns in the 1954 NFL Championship Game. For the second consecutive season, Stanfel was selected as a first-team All-NFL player by both the AP and UP.[1]

The 1955 Lions fell to 3–9, as Stanfel was injured twice, the later time suffering a spinal injury that took him out of the lineup for three weeks.[1][14] Despite the injuries, Stanfel remained one of the top offensive linemen in the NFL and was chosen to play in his second Pro Bowl after the 1955 season.[1]

Washington Redskins

In April 1956, the Lions traded Stanfel to the Washington Redskins in exchange for Dick Alban.[15] Joe Kuharich, who had been Stanfel's college coach at USF, was hired as the Redskins' head coach in 1954 and engineered the trade to acquire his former All-Coast lineman.[2] Stanfel played for Kuharich's Redskins for three seasons from 1956 to 1958. The Redskins did not register a winning season during Stanfel's tenure with the team, compiling records of 6–6 in 1956, 5–6–1 in 1957, and 4–7–1 in 1958.[16] Despite the team's subpar performance, Stanfel earned first-team All-NFL honors from the AP and UP all three years he was with the Redskins.[1] In December 1958, after the end of the season, Kuharich left the Redskins and took over as head coach of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team.[17] Within days, the press began to speculate that Stanfel, who had suffered multiple injuries during the 1958 season, would take a coaching position with Kuharich at Notre Dame.[18]

Coaching career

Notre Dame

In January 1959, Stanfel retired as a player and was hired as an assistant line coach at Notre Dame under Joe Kuharich, who had been Stanfel's head coach both at USF and with the Redskins.[19] He remained an assistant coach at Notre Dame for four years.[20] Notre Dame compiled records of 5–5, 2–8, 5–5, and 5–5 in four years under Kuharich and Stanfel. Kuharich was the only head coach in Notre Dame football history to compile a losing record (17–23) over his career with the program.[21]

California

In January 1963, Stanfel was hired as the offensive line coach for the California Golden Bears football team. He was an assistant at Cal under head coach Marv Levy.[20] Levy resigned as Cal's head coach in December 1963, and Stanfel was rumored at the time to be a leading candidate to take over as the new head coach.[22] Levy, who also coached with Stanfel on the Philadelphia Eagles' staff in 1969, later wrote about Stanfel: "When it came to teaching fundamental line techniques, Dick Stanfel had no peer. . . . Many people who played or who closely observed professional football in the 1950s . . . feel he is the best offensive lineman to have ever played the game."[23]

Philadelphia Eagles

In March 1964, Stanfel renewed his professional relationship with Kuharich, who had been hired as the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles. Kuharich hired Stanfel as the Eagles' offensive line coach.[24] With quarterback Norm Snead joining Kuharich and Stanfel in moving from the Redskins to the Eagles in 1964, the Eagles initially ranked among the NFL's offensive leaders, finishing fourth in yards gained in 1965 and second in 1966.[25] However, the defense lagged, and the Eagles compiled records of 6–8 and 5–9 in 1964 and 1965. In 1966, the team improved to 9–5, but fell to 6–7–1 in 1967 and 2–12 in 1968.[25] Kuharich left the Eagles after the 1968 season, but Stanfel remained with the club through the 1970 season.[26]

San Francisco 49ers

In February 1971, Stanfel returned to his home city as an assistant coach with the San Francisco 49ers under head coach Dick Nolan.[27] He remained with the 49ers through the 1975 season, holding positions as offensive line coach and taking over in 1975 as the offensive coordinator.[28] In the five years that Stanfel was on the staff, the 49ers compiled records of 9–5 in 1971, 8–5–1 in 1972, 5–9 in 1973, 6–8 in 1974, and 5–9 in 1975.

New Orleans Saints

In February 1976, Stanfel was hired as Hank Stram's offensive line coach with the New Orleans Saints.[28] Dick Nolan, under whom Stanfel served in San Francisco, took over as the Saints' head coach in 1978. The Saints compiled records of 4–10 in 1976, 3–11 in 1977, 7–9 in 1978, and 8–8 in 1979. When the 1980 Saints lost their first 12 games, Nolan was fired and Stanfel took over as interim head coach for the final four games of the 1980 season.[29] The Saints compiled a 1–3 record under Stanfel.

Chicago Bears

In February 1981, Stanfel was hired by Neill Armstrong as the offensive line coach for the Chicago Bears.[30] He remained with the Bears when Mike Ditka took over as head coach in 1982.[31] He remained with the Bears throughout Ditka's tenure with the team which lasted through the 1992 season. Stanfel was credited with helping to establish a solid offensive line that helped the 1985 Chicago Bears win Super Bowl XX. After the 1985 season, Ditka noted that the Bears had led the NFL in rushing for three straight years, gave credit to Stanfel, and called him "the best offensive line coach in football."[32][33]

New Orleans Saints

When Ditka was hired as the head coach of the New Orleans Saints in 1997, he persuaded Stanfel, then 70 years old, to come out of retirement as the Saints' offensive line coach.[34] Stanfel said at the time that it was his respect for Ditka that lured him back to coaching: "I respect the man. He's a hell of a coach. I think he's an honest person and a fair man, and he asked me to come back. . . . He's always been good to me, and we've coached a long time together. In fact, I coached him when he was a player a couple years (with the Eagles), so I think there's a feeling for the both of us . . ."[35] Stanfel announced his retirement from the Saints in January 1999.[36]

Head coaching record

Team Year Regular Season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
NO 1980 1 3 0 .250 4th in NFC West
NO Total 1 3 0 .250
Total 1 3 0 .250

Later years and legacy

In 1969, Stanfel was selected as an offensive guard on the NFL's 1950s All-Decade Team. He was selected as a finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in both 1993 and 2012, but failed to garner sufficient support.[37][38]

Stanfel died at age 87 in June 2015 at his home in Libertyville, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago.[39]

In February 2016, Stanfel was posthumously elected to the Hall of Fame.[40][41] The induction ceremony took place in August 2016.[42]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Dick Stanfel". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 7, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Bob Carroll (1994). "Dick Stanfel" (PDF). Coffin Corner.
  3. ^ a b c d e Bob Latshaw (December 20, 1953). "Stanfel Voted Most Valuable: Lion Who Wouldn't Stay Crippled Hailed by Club". Detroit Free Press – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ "Coast Stars Named By Platoon System". Idaho State Journal. December 5, 1950. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ Hal Wood (November 22, 1950). "UP Poll Chooses All-Star Elevens". Albany Democrat Herald. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ "Stanfel, Torgeson on West Eleven". Santa Cruz Sentinel-News. December 8, 1950. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  7. ^ a b "Lions Draft Dick Stanfel, Coast Guard". Detroit Free Press. April 15, 1951. p. 2C – via Newspapers.com. open access
  8. ^ "Lions' All-Star Rookie Hurt". Detroit Free Press. August 10, 1951. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  9. ^ "Injury Costs Lions Services of Stanfel". Detroit Free Press. September 9, 1951. p. C3 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  10. ^ a b Bob Latshaw (November 13, 1952). "What Makes Lions Run? Dick Stanfel, for One". Detroit Free Press. p. 27 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ Bob Latshaw (April 24, 1954). "Stanfel 'Shopping'". Detroit Free Press. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ "Canadian Job Sidelined By Stanfel: 'Most Valuable' Lion Signs with Detroit". Detroit Free Press. May 23, 1954. p. D1.
  13. ^ "Return of Stanfel Gives Lions Boost". The Brownsville Herald. December 24, 1954. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  14. ^ "Club's Latest Loss Is Stanfel". Detroit Free Press. October 11, 1955. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  15. ^ Bob Latshaw (April 24, 1956). "Stanfel Traded By Lions: Goes To 'Skins for Dick Alban". Detroit Free Press. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  16. ^ "Washington Redskins Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 17, 2016.
  17. ^ "Kuharich Is Named Irish Coach". The Courier-Journal (Louisville). December 23, 1958. p. 26.
  18. ^ "Stanfel Seen Likely Kuharich Assistant". The Daily Time (Salisbury, Maryland). December 29, 1958. p. 16.
  19. ^ "Stanfel Added To Grid Staff at Notre Dame". The Cincinnati Enquirer. January 15, 1959. p. 46 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  20. ^ a b "Ex-Lion Stanfel To Coach at Cal". Detroit Free Press. January 24, 1963. p. 38.
  21. ^ Keith Marder; Mark Spellen; Jim Donovan (2001). The Notre Dame Football Encyclopedia: The Ultimate Guide to America's Favorite College Team. Citadel Press. p. 115. ISBN 0806521082.
  22. ^ "Cal's Marv Levy Resigns In Surprise Move". The Fresno Bee. December 12, 1963. p. 41.
  23. ^ Marv Levy (2012). Marv Levy: Where Else Would You Rather Be?. Skyhorse Publishing Inc. p. 124. ISBN 1613210213.
  24. ^ "Former Lion Stanfel on Eagles' Staff". Detroit Free Press. March 1, 1964. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  25. ^ a b "Philadelphia Eagles Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 17, 2016.
  26. ^ "Eagles Retain Line Coach Dick Stanfel". The Express (Lock Haven, PA). May 15, 1969. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  27. ^ "Dick Stanfel New Forty-Niner Aide". The Times (San Mateo). February 9, 1971. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  28. ^ a b "Stanfel will coach Saints". The Times Standard (Eureka, CA). February 8, 1976. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  29. ^ "Saints have lost 12 straight: Stanfel relieves Nolan as New Orleans' coach". The Seguin (TX) Gazette-Enterprise. November 26, 1980. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  30. ^ "Bears Hire Marchibroda And Stanfel As Coaches". The Pharos Tribune (Logansport, Ind.). February 5, 1981. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  31. ^ "Marchibroda resigns as Bears' assistant". The Pantagraph. January 28, 1982. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  32. ^ "No love lost between Ditka, Ryan". The Galveston Daily News. February 7, 1986. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  33. ^ "Big Red". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. January 14, 1986. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  34. ^ "Old boys' club: New Orleans assistants equate age with experience". The Pantagraph. July 28, 1997. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  35. ^ "Saints relying on Iron will to lead the way". The Daily Herald (Chicago). August 31, 1997. p. 1A-6 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  36. ^ "Roll Call". The Courier-Journal. January 22, 1999. p. 19 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  37. ^ "Payton, Noll and Walsh to Hall". Detroit Free Press. January 31, 1993. p. 2E – via Newspapers.com. open access
  38. ^ Philip Zaroo (February 4, 2012). "Former Detroit Lions offensive lineman Dick Stanfel misses Hall of Fame bid". Mlive.com.
  39. ^ "NFL great, former Bears coach Dick Stanfel passes". Daily Herald. June 24, 2015.
  40. ^ Dave Birkett (February 7, 2016). "Ex-Lion Stanfel's Hall of Fame selection 'bittersweet'". Detroit Free Press.
  41. ^ Brad Biggs (February 6, 2016). "Dick Stanfel finally rewarded with Hall of Fame selection". Chicago Tribune.
  42. ^ "Dick Stanfel Selected For Induction Into Pro Football Hall Of Fame". Washington Redskins. February 6, 2016.
1950 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1950 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1950 college football season.

1952 Detroit Lions season

The 1952 Detroit Lions season resulted in the Lions winning their second National Football League (NFL) championship, having won their first championship 17 years earlier in 1935. The team's co-captains were halfback Bob Hoernschemeyer and defensive tackle John Prchlik, and defensive end Jim Doran was selected as the team's most valuable player. In their third year under head coach Buddy Parker, the 1952 Lions compiled a 9–3 record during the regular season, finished in a tie with the Los Angeles Rams for first place in the NFL's National Conference, defeated the Rams in a tiebreaker game, and defeated the Cleveland Browns, 17–7, in the 1952 NFL Championship Game at Municipal Stadium in Cleveland.

The 1952 Lions outscored opponents 354 to 192 in 12 regular season games and ranked first in the NFL with an average of 29.5 points scored per game. The offense was led by quarterback Bobby Layne who ranked second in the NFL with 2,410 yards of total offense – 1,999 passing and 411 rushing. End Cloyce Box led the NFL with 15 touchdowns, including nine touchdown catches in the final three games of the regular season. For the third consecutive year, Bob Hoernschemeyer was the team's leading rusher with 457 yards and an average of 4.3 yards per carry. Jack Christiansen led the NFL with an average of 21.5 yards per punt return, returned two punts for touchdowns, and ranked fourth in the NFL with 731 punt and kick return yards.

The Lions' defense ranked first in the NFL in points allowed, allowing 16 points per game during the regular season. Defensive back Bob Smith ranked among the NFL leaders with a 90-yard interception return (2nd), nine interceptions (3rd), and 184 interception return yards (3rd). Smith was also the team's punter and ranked second in the NFL with an average of 44.7 yards per punt. Six players from the 1952 Lions team, Layne, Christiansen, halfback Doak Walker, defensive back Yale Lary, and offensive linemen Lou Creekmur and Dick Stanfel, were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1953 All-Pro Team

The 1953 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1953 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP) (based on voting among 48 member paper sports writers and AP staffers), the United Press (UP), and the New York Daily News.

1953 Detroit Lions season

The 1953 Detroit Lions season resulted in the Lions winning their second consecutive and third overall National Football League (NFL) championship. In their fourth year under head coach Buddy Parker, the Lions compiled a 10–2 record during the regular season, outscored opponents 271 to 205, finished in first place in the NFL's Western Division, and defeated the Cleveland Browns, 17–16, in the 1953 NFL Championship Game at Briggs Stadium in Detroit.

The 1953 Lions ranked fifth in the NFL in scoring offense. The offense was led by quarterback Bobby Layne who compiled 2,431 yards of total offense (2,088 passing, 343 rushing) and 16 passing touchdowns. Halfback Doak Walker totaled 839 yards from scrimmage, (337 rushing, 502 receiving) and was the team's leading scorer with 93 points on five touchdowns, 12 field goals, and 27 extra points. For the fourth year in a row, Bob Hoernschemeyer was the team's leading rusher, contributed 764 yards from scrimmage (482 rushing, 282 receiving) and scored nine touchdowns.

The team also ranked second in the NFL in scoring defense. Defensive back Jack Christiansen led the NFL with 12 interceptions and 238 interception return yards. Eight members of the 1953 Lions were selected as first-team All-NFL players for the 1953 season: middle guard Les Bingaman, Christiansen, offensive guard Lou Creekmur, Hoernschemeyer, Layne, defensive tackle Thurman McGraw, guard Dick Stanfel, and Walker. Seven members of the team, Christiansen, Creekmur, safety Yale Lary, Layne, linebacker Joe Schmidt, guard Dick Stanfel, and Walker, were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1957 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), New York Daily News (NYDN), The Sporting News (SN), and United Press (UP) were among selectors of All-Pro teams comprising players adjudged to be the best at each position in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1957 NFL season. The AP, NEA, NYDN, and UPI selected a first and second team.

1958 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), New York Daily News (NYDN), The Sporting News (SN), and United Press International (UPI) selected All-Pro teams comprising their selections of the best players at each position in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1958 NFL season.

1960 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1960 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1960 NCAA University Division football season.

1978 New Orleans Saints season

The 1978 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints 12th season. Quarterback Archie Manning put together one of his finest seasons, earning the NFC Player of the Year award as the Saints finished with a franchise-best 7–9 mark under new head coach Dick Nolan.

1980 New Orleans Saints season

The 1980 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 14th as a member of the National Football League. It was unable to improve on the previous season's output of 8–8, winning only one game. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fourteenth consecutive season and had the dubious distinction not only of winning only a single game, but winning it by a single point against the equally disappointing Jets, who like the Saints had widely been predicted before the season to advance to their first playoff appearance since 1969.

1991 Chicago Bears season

The 1991 Chicago Bears season was their 72nd regular season and 21st postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears returned to the playoffs for a second consecutive season as one of three NFC Wild Cards, finishing with an 11–5 record and in second place in the NFC Central. They were beaten, however, by the Dallas Cowboys in their first playoff game. This was Mike Ditka's last playoff game as a head coach.

1997 New Orleans Saints season

The 1997 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints 31st season.

Dick (nickname)

Dick is a nickname for Richard. Notable people with the nickname include:

Dick Advocaat (born 1947), Dutch football manager and former player

Dick Ambrose (born 1953), former American football linebacker in the National Football League

Dick Armey (born 1940), American politician and member of US House of Representatives from Texas (1985-2003)

Frederick Ashworth (1912–2005), United States Navy officer

Dick Assman (1934– 2016), Canadian gas station owner

Dick Attlesey (1929–1984), American hurdler

Richard Joseph Audet (1922–1945), Canadian fighter pilot ace during World War II

Dick Ault (1925–2007), American Olympian

Dick Barber (1910–1983), American long jumper

Dick Bavetta (born 1939), American retired professional basketball referee for the National Basketball Association (NBA)

Dick Butkus (born 1942), former American football player, sports commentator, and actor

Dick Cavett (born 1936), American television talk show host

Dick Cheney (born 1941), American politician who served as the 46th Vice President of the United States from 2001 to 2009

Dick Clark (1929–2012), American radio and television personality

Dick Clark (senator) (born 1928), American politician and US Senator from Iowa (1973-1979)

Dick Contino (1930–2017), American accordionist

Dick Davis (running back) (born 1946), American football player

Dick Davis (defensive end) (born 1938), American football player

Dick Enberg (1935–2017), American sportscaster

Dick Fencl (1910–1972), American football player

Richard S. Fuld Jr. (born 1946), American banker best known as the final Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lehman Brothers

Dick Hoblitzell (1888–1962), American Major League Baseball player

Dick Ives (1926–1997), American basketball player

Dick Johnson (racing driver) (born 1945), Australian touring car driver and team owner

Richard Lamm (born 1935), American politician, writer, Certified Public Accountant, college professor, and lawyer

Richard Lyon (1923–2017), United States Navy admiral and former mayor of Oceanside, California

Richard Marcinko (born 1940), former United States Navy officer and retired Navy SEAL

Dick Murdoch (1946–1996), American professional wrestler

Dick Pole (born 1950), American baseball player and coach

Dick Pound (born 1942), Canadian swimming champion and first president of the World Anti-Doping Agency

Dick Reynolds (1915–2002), Australian rules footballer who represented Essendon in the Victorian Football League (VFL)

Dick Rutkowski, diving medicine pioneer

Richard "Dick" Savitt (born 1927), American tennis player

Dick Shawn (1923–1987), American actor and comedian

Dick Shikat (1897–1968), German professional wrestler and World Heavyweight Champion

Dick Stanfel (1927–2015), American football player

Dick Schweidler (1914–2010), American football player

Dick Tayler (born 1948), New Zealand long-distance runner

Dick Thornburgh (born 1932), American politician, Governor of Pennsylvania (1979-1987), and US Attorney General (1988-1991)

Dick Turpin (1705–1739), English highwayman executed for horse theft

Dick Van Dyke (born 1925), American actor, comedian, writer and producer

Richard Winters (1918–2011), officer of the United States Army and decorated war veteran

Richard McCourt (born 1976), Tv presenter

Dick Nolan (American football)

Richard Charles Nolan (March 26, 1932 – November 11, 2007) was an American football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL), and served as the head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints.

Don Reese

Donald Francis Reese (September 4, 1951 – September 18, 2003) was an American football defensive end who played in the National Football League and the United States Football League. He played professionally for the Miami Dolphins, the New Orleans Saints and the San Diego Chargers and the Birmingham Stallions of the USFL.

List of New Orleans Saints head coaches

The New Orleans Saints are a professional American football team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. They are a member of the South Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The NFL awarded the city of New Orleans the 16th franchise in the league in November 1, 1966, All Saints Day, five months after the 89th United States Congress approved the merger of the NFL with the American Football League (AFL) in June of that year. In January 1967, the team was given the current "New Orleans Saints" name, and began playing in their first season in September of that year. Since the franchise's creation, it has been based in New Orleans. The team's home games were originally played at Tulane Stadium from 1967 to 1974, it was demolished in 1979, when the team relocated its home games to its current stadium, the Mercedes-Benz Superdome (formerly Louisiana Superdome from 1975 to 2011).The New Orleans Saints have had 16 head coaches in their franchise history—ten full-time coaches and six interim coaches. Sean Payton has been the head coach of the Saints since 2006. Payton served as the assistant head coach/passing game coordinator and assistant head coach/quarterbacks for the Dallas Cowboys for three seasons before he joined the Saints in 2006. In the 2009 season, he led the team to its second NFC Championship Game and first NFC Championship title, Super Bowl (XLIV) appearance, and NFL Championship. Tom Fears, the franchise's first head coach serving from 1967 to 1970, was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1970, and is the only coach to be inducted into the Hall of Fame while spending his entire coaching career with the Saints. Hank Stram, who coached the Saints from 1976 to 1977, and Mike Ditka, who coached the Saints from 1997 to 1999, were also inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003 and 1988, respectively. Sean Payton has coached the most games for the Saints, with 170. Payton has the highest winning percentage while coaching the Saints, with .588, and his 102 wins are the most in franchise history. J. D. Roberts has the lowest winning percentage (.219) and fewest wins (seven) for a full-time coach. Jim Haslett, Mora, and Payton are the only head coaches to lead the Saints into the playoffs. Mora, Haslett, and Payton have won the AP Coach of the Year Award and the Sporting News NFL Coach of the Year.

List of New Orleans Saints seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the New Orleans Saints American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Saints' franchise from 1967 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coach.

National Football League 1950s All-Decade Team

This is a list of all NFL players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1950s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame retroactively in 1969 to mark the league's 50th anniversary.

Notes:

N1 Team that belonged to the All-America Football Conference for at least part of the player's tenure

Nick Nicolau

Anthero "Nick" Nicolau (May 5, 1933 – December 6, 2014) was a longtime NFL and college football assistant coach. He graduated from Southern Connecticut State University.He spent most of the 1960s -'70s coaching at college programs such as Bridgeport (Head Coach), Massachusetts, Connecticut, Kentucky, and Kent State.

Nicolau broke into the NFL with the New Orleans Saints in 1980 under then head coach Dick Stanfel. He moved on to the Denver Broncos, coaching the running backs from 1981 through 1987. Some of the players he coached included Dave Preston, Sammy Winder, and Steve Sewell.

After a dispute that ended his tenure in Denver, he landed with the Buffalo Bills and served as their wide receivers coach from 1989–1991. There he worked with talents such as Andre Reed and Don Beebe.

In 1992, he became the offensive coordinator of the Indianapolis Colts under head coach Ted Marchibroda with whom he worked in Buffalo. He helped the Colts to a 9–7 record in 1992 and an 8–8 record in 1994. He helped develop Reggie Langhorne as a receiver and worked with quarterback Jeff George as well. In 1994, he helped turn running back Marshall Faulk as a rookie while also working with both Jim Harbaugh and Don Majkowski at quarterback.

Nicolau then spent two seasons coaching the tight ends for the Jacksonville Jaguars, helping to develop Pete Mitchell as a blocker and receiver. In 1997, Jaguars offensive coordinator Kevin Gilbride became the head coach of the San Diego Chargers and Nicolau followed him to California. There he served two years as the Chargers assistant head coach before retiring after the 1998 NFL season. He died aged 81 on December 6, 2014.

Vince Tringali

Vince Tringali (August 1, 1928 – May 31, 2010) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of San Francisco where he was on a line that included future National Football League (NFL) players Gino Marchetti, Dick Stanfel, and Bob St. Clair.After a successful run as the head football coach at St. Ignatius College Preparatory school in San Francisco, California, he served as the final head coach at USF, from 1969 to 1971, before the program was shut down.Tringali is noted for convincing future NFL player Igor Olshansky to play high school football.

Dick Stanfel—championships, awards, and honors

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