Dick Siebert

Richard Walther Siebert (February 19, 1912 – December 9, 1978) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who had an 11-year career from 1932, 1936–1945. He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals, both of the National League, and the Philadelphia A's of the American League. He was elected to the American League All-Star team in 1943.

Born in Fall River, Massachusetts, he grew up in Cass Lake and Saint Paul, Minnesota.[1]

In an 11-year major league career, Siebert compiled a .282 batting average (1104-3917), scoring 439 runs, with 32 home runs and 482 RBI in 1035 games played. His on-base percentage was .332 and slugging percentage was .379. Primarily a first baseman, he recorded a .990 fielding percentage.

Following his playing career, Siebert became head baseball coach at the University of Minnesota in 1948. The "Chief" went on to become one of the greatest coaches in college baseball history and helped develop baseball at all levels in Minnesota. He led the Golden Gophers to College World Series titles in 1956, 1960 and 1964. By the time his career had ended in Gold Country, Siebert had become the winningest coach in Gopher history with a 754–361–6 record and a .676 winning percentage. He sent five different teams to the College World Series and brought home three NCAA titles in 1956, 1960 and 1964. His teams also captured 12 Big Ten titles, and he endured only three losing seasons.

In addition to coaching the Minnesota Gophers, during the 1950s Siebert was a player/coach for the Litchfield Optimists, the Willmar Rails, and the Minneapolis Kopps Realty teams in Minnesota amateur Town Team Baseball. This arrangement allowed Siebert to evaluate talent and coach his Gophers players during the collegiate off-season.

Siebert served as the president of the American College Baseball Coaches Association. Among his many honors and accolades, Siebert was twice named as college baseball's Coach of the Year, was a member of the College Baseball Hall of Fame, and was a recipient of college baseball's highest award, the Lefty Gomez Trophy, which recognizes an individual who has made an outstanding contribution and given service to the development of college baseball.

Siebert died at age 66 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. His son, Paul Siebert, pitched for the Astros, Padres and Mets from 1974 to 1978. On April 21, 1979, Minnesota renamed its baseball stadium Siebert Field in Siebert's honor.

Dick Siebert
Dick Siebert 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
First baseman
Born: February 19, 1912
Fall River, Massachusetts
Died: December 9, 1978 (aged 66)
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 7, 1932, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 1945, for the Philadelphia Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.282
Home runs32
Runs batted in482
Teams
Career highlights and awards

References

  1. ^ A round-up of worthy books by Minnesotans Retrieved 2017-05-30.

External links

1932 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1932 Brooklyn Dodgers season was the first season the franchise was officially known as the Dodgers, with the name making its first appearance on some of the team's jerseys. The Dodgers nickname had in use since the 1890s and was used interchangeably with other nicknames in media reports, particularly "Robins" in reference to longtime manager Wilbert Robinson. With Robinson's retirement after the 1931 season and the arrival of Max Carey, the nickname "Robins" was no longer used. The team wound up finishing the season in third place.

1936 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1936 Brooklyn Dodgers fired manager Casey Stengel after another dismal campaign, which saw the team finish in 6th place.

1939 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1939 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing seventh in the American League with a record of 55 wins and 97 losses.

1941 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1941 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 64 wins and 90 losses.

1943 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1943 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 11th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1943, at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, the home of the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 5–3.

This was the first major league All-Star Game scheduled as a night game.

1945 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1945 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 52 wins and 98 losses.

1956 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team

The 1956 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1956 NCAA baseball season. The Golden Gophers played their home games at Delta Field. The team was coached by Dick Siebert in his 9th season at Minnesota.

The Golden Gophers won the College World Series, defeating the Arizona Wildcats in the championship game.

1956 NCAA Baseball Tournament

The 1956 NCAA Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1956 NCAA baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its tenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 24 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The College World Series was held in Omaha, NE from June 9 to June 14. The tenth tournament's champion was Minnesota, coached by Dick Siebert. The Most Outstanding Player was Jerry Thomas of Minnesota.

1960 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team

The 1960 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1960 NCAA University Division baseball season. The Golden Gophers played their home games at Delta Field. The team was coached by Dick Siebert in his 13th season at Minnesota.

The Golden Gophers won the College World Series, defeating the USC Trojans in the championship game.

1960 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1960 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1960 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its fourteenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 26 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The College World Series was held in Omaha, NE from June 10 to June 20. The fourteenth tournament's champion was Minnesota, coached by Dick Siebert. The Most Outstanding Player was John Erickson of Minnesota.

1964 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team

The 1964 Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1964 NCAA University Division baseball season. The Golden Gophers played their home games at Delta Field. The team was coached by Dick Siebert in his 17th season at Minnesota.

The Golden Gophers won the College World Series, defeating the Missouri Tigers in the championship game.

1964 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1964 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1964 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its eighteenth year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 21 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The College World Series was held in Omaha, NE from June 8 to June 18. The eighteenth tournament's champion was Minnesota, coached by Dick Siebert. The Most Outstanding Player was Joe Ferris of third place Maine.

1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament

The 1973 NCAA University Division Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1973 NCAA University Division baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-seventh year. Eight regional districts sent representatives to the College World Series with preliminary rounds within each district serving to determine each representative. These events would later become known as regionals. Each district had its own format for selecting teams, resulting in 32 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-seventh tournament's champion was the University of Southern California, coached by Rod Dedeaux. The Most Outstanding Player was Dave Winfield of Minnesota. Winfield was the starting pitcher in two games, tossing 17​1⁄3 innings, allowing 9 hits, 1 earned run, and striking out 29. In addition, he batted .467 in the Series.

Southern California became the first team to win four consecutive College World Series.

Bruce Konopka

Bruno Bruce Konopka (September 16, 1919 – September 27, 1996) was an American professional baseball player during the 1940s. A first baseman, his four-season (1942–1943; 1946–1947) professional career was interrupted by service in the United States Navy in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II. However, Konopka did appear in 45 Major League games for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1942, 1943 and 1946 seasons. He was born in Hammond, Indiana, but attended Manual High School in Denver, Colorado, and college at the University of Southern California.Konopka batted and threw left-handed. He stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg).

He made his Major League debut in his first pro season. In his first game, June 7 at Shibe Park, he relieved Dick Siebert at first base for the Athletics, but was held hitless in two at bats by Bob Muncrief of the St. Louis Browns. He registered his first MLB hit, a single, as a pinch hitter 16 days later. He spent most of the rest of that season with the Class B Wilmington Blue Rocks, but returned to the Athletics in September to go two-for-four against the Washington Senators on September 19. He batted only twice for the Athletics in 1943 before being called into the military. Then he split the 1946 season between Philadelphia and the Triple-A Toronto Maple Leafs and San Diego Padres. In 38 games for the 1946 A's, 20 as the starting first baseman, he collected 22 hits, including four doubles and a triple. Altogether, during his brief MLB career, he had 25 hits, scored nine runs, and logged ten runs batted in. He did not hit a home run.

Konopka played one more year in minor league baseball, in 1947 at the Double-A level, before leaving baseball. He died in Denver at the age of 77.

College World Series

The College World Series (CWS) is an annual June baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska. The CWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

Paul Easterling

Paul Easterling (September 28, 1905 – March 15, 1993) was a major league outfielder for the Detroit Tigers (1928, 1930) and the Philadelphia Athletics (1938). He batted and threw right-handed. Easterling debuted in 1928 with the Detroit Tigers, playing in 43 games and hitting .325 with seven doubles and four home runs. He took a year off and came back with the Tigers in 1930, this time only playing in 29 games and hitting .203 with 14 Runs batted in. Then, Easterling took seven years off before being signed by the Philadelphia Athletics on September 10, 1937. He played in 4 games for them in 1938, getting 2 hits in his only seven at-bats. Easterling was then traded along with Gene Hasson to the St. Louis Cardinals for Dick Siebert. He would never play again in the major leagues.

Easterling died in his birth town of Reidsville, Georgia in 1993 at the age of 87.

Paul Siebert

Paul Edward Siebert (born June 5, 1953) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched parts of five seasons in the majors, from 1974 until 1978. Paul's father was former major league first baseman Dick Siebert.

Siebert was selected in the 3rd round (58th overall) of the 1971 amateur entry draft by the Houston Astros. He made his major league baseball debut with the Astros in 1974, and was traded to the San Diego Padres before the 1977 season.

Siebert was part of the infamous "Saturday Night Massacre" in New York. On June 15, 1977, the Mets traded Dave Kingman to the San Diego Padres for Siebert and Bobby Valentine, sent Tom Seaver to the Cincinnati Reds for Pat Zachry, Doug Flynn, Steve Henderson and Dan Norman, and Mike Phillips to the St. Louis Cardinals for Joel Youngblood. Siebert split the rest of that year as well as 1978 between the Mets and the minor league Tidewater Tides.

Siebert was traded to the Cardinals after the 1978 season, but was released at the end of spring training in 1979. He signed with the Montreal Expos, playing for the Denver Bears in 1979 before retiring.

Siebert

Siebert Name Meaning German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements sigi ‘victory’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.The name may refer to:

Al Siebert (1934–2009), American author and researcher in psychological resilience

Allan Siebert, American bridge player

Babe Siebert (1904–1939), Canadian professional ice hockey player

Bill Siebert (b. 1947), former member of the Texas House of Representatives

Christoph Siebert, German choral conductor

Daniel Lee Siebert (1954–2008), American serial killer

Daniel Siebert (ethnobotanist) (contemporary), American ethnobotanist, pharmacognosist, and author

Daniel Siebert (referee) (contemporary), German football referee

Detlef Siebert (contemporary), British television writer and director

Dick Siebert (1912–1978), American professional baseball player

Gloria Siebert (b. 1964), German Olympic hurdler

Günter Siebert (1930–2017), German footballer

Günter Siebert (born 1931), German weightlifter

Hannes Siebert (b. 1961), South African diplomat

Klaus Siebert (1955–2016), German Olympic biathlete

Ludwig Siebert (1874–1942), Nazi politician; Prime Minister of Bavaria 1933–42

Ludwig Siebert (b. 1939), German Olympic bobsledder

Muriel Siebert (1928–2013), American businesswoman; first woman to hold a seat on the New York Stock Exchange

Neville Siebert, New Zealand international football (soccer) player

Sonny Siebert (b. 1937), American professional baseball player

Thomas L. Siebert (b. 1946), American lawyer and diplomat; ambassador to Sweden 1994–97

Siebert Field

Siebert Field is a baseball park in the north central United States, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is the home venue for the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers of the Big Ten Conference, and is named in honor of Dick Siebert, a former head coach who led the Gophers to three national titles. From 1971 to 1978, the venue was known as Bierman Field in honor of Bernie Bierman.

Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

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