Dick Kazmaier

Richard William Kazmaier Jr. (November 23, 1930 – August 1, 2013) was an American football player for Princeton University from 1949 through 1951 and winner of the 1951 Heisman Trophy.

Dick Kazmaier
Dick Kazmaier Jr. Statue
A cast bronze statue of Kazmaier, by Timothy Maslin, 2008, outside Jadwin Gymnasium on the campus of Princeton University
Princeton Tigers – No. 42
PositionHalfback
ClassGraduate
Career history
College
High schoolMaumee
Personal information
Born:November 23, 1930
Maumee, Ohio
Died:August 1, 2013 (aged 82)
Boston, Massachusetts
Career highlights and awards
College Football Hall of Fame (1966)

Early life and career

Kazmaier was born November 23, 1930, in Toledo, Ohio, the only child of Richard and Marian Kazmaier.[1] He graduated from Maumee High School in Ohio in 1948. He played football (four years), basketball (four years), track and field (four years), baseball (four years) and golf (one year) earning a letter each year in each sport. He was recruited by 23 colleges, most offering full scholarships.[2]

As a halfback, kicker and quarterback, he ended his career third all time in Princeton history with over 4,000 yards of offense and 55 touchdowns.

Kazmaier was named an All-American and won the Maxwell Award and the Heisman Trophy in 1951 after his senior season. (John McGillicuddy was Kazmaier's fellow football player and roommate at Princeton.) Kazmaier was named Ivy League Football Player of the Decade in 1960 and Time Magazine ran his picture on its cover.[3] He was the last Heisman Trophy winner to play for an Ivy League institution.[4] The Chicago Bears selected him in the 1952 NFL Draft, but he declined to play pro football, instead going to Harvard Business School. After spending three years in the Navy (1955–1957) and attaining the rank of lieutenant, he founded Kazmaier Associated Inc, an investment firm in Concord, Massachusetts.[5]

Later life

Kazmaier served as a director of the American Red Cross, director of the Ladies Professional Golfers Association, trustee of Princeton University, director of the Knight Foundation on Intercollegiate Athletics, chairman of the President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush and president of the National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame. The NCAA gave him its Silver Anniversary Award. He also received the National Football Foundation Distinguished American Award.[6]

In 2007, during a Maumee football game against Perrysburg, Kazmaier was honored by having his jersey number (#42) retired.[7] He also donated his Heisman Trophy to Maumee High School, where it is displayed inside a glass case in the main hallway.[8] The stadium at Maumee High School is named in his honor. His daughter, the late Patty Kazmaier-Sandt, was an All-Ivy member of the Princeton women's ice hockey team who died in 1990 at the age of 28 from a rare blood disease. The Patty Kazmaier Award, which was established by Kazmaier to memorialize his daughter, is given to the top woman college ice hockey player in the United States at the annual Women's Frozen Four NCAA championship.[9]

Personal

Kazmaier died on August 1, 2013, in Boston from heart and lung disease. He was 82 and is survived by his wife of 60 years, the former Patricia Hoffmann, five daughters, and several grandchildren. He was predeceased by daughter Patty Kazmaier-Sandt.[10][11]

Honors

See also

References

  1. ^ "Dick Kazmaier; 1930-2013: Maumee star won Heisman". toledoblade.com. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  2. ^ richardwkazmaier Archived 2011-07-20 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Heisman.com - Heisman Trophy Archived 2009-08-04 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ World Almanac and Book of Facts 2005, at 978 (World Almanac Books, 2005).
  5. ^ "Illustrious Maumee graduate will present school with copy of his 1951 Heisman Trophy". toledoblade.com. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  6. ^ Litsky, Frank (1 August 2013). "Dick Kazmaier, a Heisman Winner Who Passed on the N.F.L., Dies at 82". NY Times. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  7. ^ Princeton Alumni Weekly 11/19/2008 http://paw.princeton.edu/issues/2008/11/19/pages/1716/
  8. ^ Maumee City Schools News Archived 2007-09-24 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ "The Patty Kazmaier Memorial Award". usahockey.com/. Archived from the original on 2 August 2013. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  10. ^ "Former Princeton standout, Heisman winner Dick Kazmaier dies". trentonian.com. Retrieved 2 August 2013.
  11. ^ Litsky, Frank (1 August 2013). "Dick Kazmaier, a Heisman Winner Who Passed on the N.F.L., Dies at 82". The New York Times.

External links

1950 College Football All-America Team

The 1950 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1950. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1950 season are (1) the All-America Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FW), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

Ohio State halfback Vic Janowicz, Army end Dan Foldberg, and Texas guard Bud McFadin were the only three players to be unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all eight official selectors. Janowicz was awarded the 1950 Heisman Trophy.

1950 Princeton Tigers football team

The 1950 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) intercollegiate competition during the 1950 season. The Tigers were led by sixth-year head coach Charlie Caldwell, a future College Football Hall of Fame inductee, who utilized an "unbalanced" version of the single-wing formation. The Princeton offense, which made use of the buck-lateral series, was one of the last successful employers of the single-wing formation, which had been made obsolete by the modernized T formation.Princeton finished with a perfect undefeated record of 9–0, and the Tigers outscored their opponents 349–94. Against other future Ivy League teams, Princeton compiled a 5–0 record.Some selectors named Princeton the national champions, most notably the NCAA-recognized Poling System and Boand System. Princeton was ranked sixth in the Associated Press and eighth in the United Press final polls. After the season, Tigers halfback Dick Kazmaier, tackle Holland Donan, and center Redmond Finney received first-team All-America honors. Kazmaier and Donan were eventually inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1951 College Football All-America Team

The 1951 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1951. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1951 season are (1) the All-American Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA, (3) the Associated Press (AP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News and (8) the United Press (UP).

1951 Princeton Tigers football team

The 1951 Princeton Tigers football team represented Princeton University in the 1951 college football season.

The team was considered the best in the East, winning the Lambert-Meadowlands Trophy, and was ranked sixth nationally. Dick Kazmaier won the Heisman Trophy and was the nation's total offense leader in his senior year as well as the most accurate passer in the country.

1951 in sports

1951 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

1952 NFL Draft

The 1952 National Football League Draft was held on January 17, 1952, at Hotel Statler in New York. Selections made by New York Yanks were assigned to the new Dallas Texans.

Washington Post sportswriter Mo Siegel later claimed that Washington Redskins owner George Preston Marshall let him choose a late-round pick. Siegel, he said, chose Tennessee Tech's Flavious Smith to force the first black player onto the all-white Redskins. If true, Marshall likely persuaded NFL Commissioner Bert Bell to remove the choice from the official records. (Smith, who did not hear the story until years later, was white.)

Associated Press Athlete of the Year

The first Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP) in 1931. At a time when women in sports were not given the same recognition as men, the AP offered a male and a female athlete of the year award to either a professional or amateur athlete. The awards are voted on annually by a panel of AP sports editors from across the United States. A large majority of the winners have been Americans. However, non-Americans are also eligible for the honor, and have won on a few occasions.

John McGillicuddy

John Francis McGillicuddy (December 30, 1930 – January 4, 2009) was an American banking industry executive who oversaw the merger between Manufacturers Hanover Trust and Chemical Bank in the early 1990s.

McGillicuddy played football for Harrison High School and then attended Princeton University on a football scholarship, playing defensive back on the college's undefeated football teams in 1950 and 1951. His roommate at Princeton was fellow football player Dick Kazmaier, who won the Heisman Trophy for 1951. John McGillicuddy later attended Harvard Law School and was hired by the law firm of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett after serving in the United States Navy.He was hired by Manufacturers Trust Company in 1958. He was elected to serve as the bank's president in 1970 at age 39, making him one of the youngest people ever to run a major banking company, after his predecessor R. E. McNeil, Jr. announced that he would be stepping down.During New York City's fiscal crisis during the 1970s, McGillicuddy helped organize the financial aid needed to bail out the city. He later played a key role in the late 1970s in the Bailout of Chrysler, working to organize the government loan guarantees that helped that company avoid bankruptcy.

In 1991, as chairman and chief executive of Manufacturers Hanover, McGillicuddy was the chief architect of a merger with the Chemical Banking Corporation that was the largest bank merger in the United States to that time, helping both companies deal with difficulties arising from problem loans in previous years. Following the merger, McGillicuddy became the chairman and chief executive of the combined institution, remaining with the bank until his retirement in 1993 when he was to be followed by Walter V. Shipley, who had been the chairman of Chemical.The merger ushered in a wave of consolidation in the banking industry that continued with Chemical purchasing Chase Manhattan Corporation and assuming that company's name in 1996 and a December 2000 deal with J.P. Morgan & Co. that formed JPMorgan Chase & Co.McGillicuddy served on the boards of organizations and companies including the Boy Scouts of America, Kraft Foods, United Airlines and U.S. Steel.McGillicuddy died at age 78 on January 4, 2009 at his home in Harrison, New York due to complications from prostate cancer. He is interred at Greenwood Union Cemetery.

Kazmaier

Kazmaier is a surname. Notable people with the name Kazmaier include:

Bill Kazmaier, champion powerlifter, strongman, and wrestler

Dick Kazmaier, American football player and winner of the 1951 Heisman Trophy

Patty Kazmaier-Sandt, American ice hockey player

List of Princeton Tigers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Princeton Tigers football players in the NFL Draft.

List of people from Concord, Massachusetts

The following list includes notable people who were born or have lived in Concord, Massachusetts.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Patty Kazmaier-Sandt

Patty Kazmaier-Sandt (January 8, 1962 – February 15, 1990) was a four-year varsity letter-winner for the Princeton University women's ice hockey team from 1981 through 1986. The Patty Kazmaier Award is named in her honor.

Patty Kazmaier Award

The Patty Kazmaier Award is given to the top female college ice hockey player in the United States. The award is presented during the women's annual ice hockey championship, the Frozen Four. The award was first presented in 1998.

The award is named in honor of the late Patty Kazmaier-Sandt, a four-year varsity letter winner and All Ivy League honoree for the Princeton University women's ice hockey team from 1981 through 1986. She also played field hockey and lacrosse. She died on February 15, 1990 at the age of 28 from a rare blood disease. Patty was the daughter of Heisman Trophy winner Dick Kazmaier.

Princeton Tigers football

The Princeton Tigers football program represents Princeton University and competes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level as a member of the Ivy League. Princeton’s football program—along with the football program at nearby Rutgers University—began in 1869 with a contest that is often regarded as the beginnings of American Football.

Princeton–Yale football rivalry

The Princeton–Yale football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Princeton Tigers of Princeton University and the Yale Bulldogs of Yale University. The football rivalry is among the oldest in American sports.

Sporting News College Football Player of the Year

The Sporting News College Football Player of the Year award is given to the player of the year in college football as adjudged by Sporting News.

Sports Hall of Fame of New Jersey

The Sports Hall of Fame of New Jersey was established in 1988 to honor athletes, teams, events and contributors associated with the state of New Jersey. There is currently no physical site or structure for the hall, but its members are honored with plaques that are displayed at Meadowlands Arena — in the Meadowlands Sports Complex — in East Rutherford.The first group of members was inducted in May 1993. Inductees are honored in a public ceremony that takes place during New York Giants football games.

UPI College Football Player of the Year

The United Press International College Football Player of the Year Award was among the first and most recognized college football awards. With the second bankruptcy of UPI in 1991, along with that of its parent company, the award was discontinued. Offensive and defensive players were eligible. Unlike the Heisman, it was never affiliated with a civic organization or named after a player (like the Walter Camp Award). Like all UPI college awards at the time, it was based on the votes of NCAA coaches. Billy Cannon, O.J. Simpson, and Archie Griffin are the only two-time winners.

Dick Kazmaier—awards, and honors

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