Dick Groat

Richard Morrow Groat (born November 4, 1930) is a former two-sport athlete best known as a shortstop in Major League Baseball. He played for four National League teams, mainly the Pittsburgh Pirates and St. Louis Cardinals, and was named the league's Most Valuable Player in 1960 after winning the batting title with a .325 average for the champion Pirates. From 1956 to 1962 he teamed with second baseman Bill Mazeroski to give Pittsburgh one of the game's strongest middle infields.

Groat led the NL in double plays a record five times, in putouts four times and in assists twice. At the end of his career he ranked ninth in major league history in games at shortstop (1,877) and fourth in double plays (1,237), and was among the NL career leaders in putouts (10th, 3,505), assists (8th, 5,811) and total chances (9th, 9,690).

Also an excellent basketball player, Groat attended Duke University and is a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. He was twice an All-American at Duke and was voted as the Helms National Player of the Year in 1952 after averaging 25.2 points per game. He played one season as a guard in the National Basketball Association. In 2011 Groat was inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame, becoming the first man ever inducted into both the college basketball and college baseball halls of fame. From 1969 to 2019 he was the color commentator for Pittsburgh Panthers men's basketball radio broadcasts.

Dick Groat
Dick Groat 1960
Groat in 1960.
Shortstop
Born: November 4, 1930 (age 88)
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 19, 1952, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1967, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average.286
Hits2,138
Home runs39
Runs batted in707
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Dick Groat
Personal information
BornNovember 4, 1930 (age 88)
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania
NationalityAmerican
Listed height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Listed weight180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High schoolSwissvale
(Swissvale, Pennsylvania)
CollegeDuke (1949–1952)
NBA draft1952 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
Selected by the Fort Wayne Pistons
Playing career1952–1953
PositionGuard
Number5
Career history
1952–1953Fort Wayne Pistons
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points309 (11.9 ppg)
Assists69 (2.7 asp)
Rebounds86 (3.3 rpg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2007

Baseball

Groat was signed by Pirates general manager Branch Rickey just days after graduating from Duke, where he had been a 2-time All-American in basketball and baseball. Both the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants were also interested in him, but he had always hoped to play for the Pirates after growing up a few miles away from Forbes Field. He broke in with the Pirates in June, never playing in the minor leagues, and batted .284 over the rest of the year. Afterwards, he pursued his basketball career before serving two years in the Army. He led Fort Belvoir teams to worldwide Army championships in both sports, the first time a single base had won both titles in the same year, hitting .362 in baseball and averaging 35 points per game in basketball.

Returning to the Pirates in 1955, he batted second for the team, with leadoff hitter Bill Virdon later recalling his particular skill at the hit and run. That year he led the NL in putouts for the first time; pitcher Roy Face has noted that Groat was always in the best position for the various hitters, although he didn't have great speed or a strong arm. In 1956, he set the all-time record for most at bats in a season (520) without a home run or stolen base.[1] He batted .315 (fifth in the league) in 1957, along with a career high of 7 home runs; on September 29 of that year against the Giants, he threw out the final batter to end the Giants last home game ever at the Polo Grounds.[2]. In 1958 he again hit .300, and led the NL in putouts and double plays as the Pirates finished in second place, the first time they had placed higher than seventh since 1949. He led the NL in putouts and double plays again in 1959, and made his first of five All-Star teams. In the ensuing offseason he was nearly traded for Roger Maris, but the deal was cancelled by manager Danny Murtaugh.

Groat responded with his best year as team captain, becoming the first Pirate to be named MVP since Paul Waner in their last pennant year of 1927, and also the first right-handed Pirates hitter to win the batting title since Honus Wagner in 1911. He missed a few weeks late in the season after having his wrist broken by a Lew Burdette pitch on September 6. In the 1960 World Series against the New York Yankees, he tied Game 1 at 1-1 with a first-inning double and scored to give Pittsburgh the lead; they stayed in front, winning 6-4, with Groat turning a double play to end the game. In Game 7, he had an RBI single and scored in the eighth inning, in which the Pirates scored five runs to take a 9-7 lead; the Pirates won the Series on Mazeroski's famed home run in the next inning.

In 1961 Groat batted .275, and together with Mazeroski led the league in double plays. In 1962 he batted .294, finishing third in the league in doubles (34), and led the NL in putouts, assists and double plays. In November 1962, in the hope of bolstering the team's pitching, general manager Joe L. Brown traded him to the Cardinals in exchange for Don Cardwell. Groat was deeply hurt by the trade, having hoped to become a coach and eventually manager after retiring, and severed all contact with the team until a 1990 reunion of the 1960 champions. He had another outstanding year in 1963, finishing fourth in the league with a .319 batting average – just seven points behind champion Tommy Davis – and collecting 201 hits. He also led the NL with 43 doubles, and was third with a personal high of 11 triples; he was the runnerup in the MVP voting, behind Sandy Koufax.

In 1964 he batted .292 for the pennant-winning Cardinals, again leading the league in assists and double plays and making his last All-Star team. In the World Series against the Yankees, he reached base on Bobby Richardson's error in the sixth inning of Game 4, and scored on Ken Boyer's grand slam in the 4-3 St. Louis victory. Groat also tagged out Mickey Mantle in the third inning of that game on a pickoff play.[2] He scored in the 3-run tenth inning of Game 5, a 5-2 win, and had an RBI groundout in the final 7-5 win in Game 7. After hitting .254 in 1965, he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in a six-player deal. He batted .265 for the 1966 Phillies, and his contract was sold to the Giants (now in San Francisco) in June 1967; he ended his career that season with a .156 average in 44 games.

In a fourteen-season career, Groat compiled a .286 batting average with 2138 hits, 39 home runs, 829 runs, 707 runs batted in, 352 doubles and 14 stolen bases in 1929 games.

Other highlights

Basketball

Groat played college basketball for Duke University. He was twice (1951 and 1952) an All-American, and was named the Helms Foundation Player of the Year in 1951 and the UPI National Player of the Year in 1952 after setting an NCAA record with 839 points. On May 1 of that year, his #10 was the first jersey to be retired in the rafters of Cameron Indoor Stadium, and it remained the only jersey retired by the school until 1980. During the 1951–52 season, he scored 48 points against North Carolina, the most ever scored against the Tar Heels.[4]

After college, Groat was drafted with the 3rd overall pick in the 1952 NBA Draft as a guard for the Fort Wayne Pistons of the National Basketball Association. He played only one season for 26 games with the number 5, and averaged 11.9 points 3.3 rebounds 2.7 assists with a .368 FG%. His basketball career was cut short by military service though; when his enlistment was up, he returned to the Pirates but not to the Pistons. Groat was inducted into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame in 2007.[5]

Groat served as a radio color analyst for the Pittsburgh Panthers men's basketball games and was part of Pitt basketball broadcasts with partner Bill Hillgrove since 1979. [6] He was not retained after the completion of the 2018-2019 season. [7]

Other

In the Larry David HBO comedy series, Curb Your Enthusiasm (S2.E5 "The Thong"), Rob Reiner convinces Larry to participate in a celebrity auction to benefit Groat's Syndrome (a fictional neurological disorder). Reiner describes it affecting "kids and adults who have a tough time controlling their hyperactivity. It's as if you were on five cups of coffee at all times." Reiner claims it was named after the doctor who discovered it but Larry David's character speculates it was named for Dick Groat, who he assumes must have had the disease because, as Larry says, "he didn't field very well because he was excited all the time."

Although fictional, a viral "Walk Across America For Groats Disease" begins every March 21 from Springboro, Ohio. The "Walk" takes about six months to reach the final destination in California and raises millions of (fictitious) dollars for Groats Disease victims.

Dick Groat is the great uncle of the golfer Brooks Koepka, who won the 2017 and 2018 U.S. Open (golf), and the 2018 and 2019 PGA Championship.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Classic Baseball on the Radio (January 5, 2017), 1964 10 11 World Series Game 4 Yankees vs Cardinals Complete Radio Broadcast, retrieved August 13, 2017
  3. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/legendary/baseball_and_basketball_players.shtml
  4. ^ UNC overcomes 46 points from Rice, 18-point second-half deficit
  5. ^ "Dick Groat Inducted into National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame". PittsburghPanthers.com: Pittsburgh Official Athletic Site. November 19, 2007. Retrieved January 8, 2009.
  6. ^ Fittipaldo, Ray (December 18, 2007). "Ex-Duke star Groat is Panther at heart". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved January 8, 2009.
  7. ^ {cite news | url=https://www.post-gazette.com/sports/Pitt/2019/03/13/pitt-athletics-basketball-football-dick-groat-broadcaster/stories/201903130104}}

External links

[1]

  1. ^ https://www.golf.com/news/columns/2019/05/18/brooks-koepka-family-championship-background/
1951 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947-1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1951 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1951 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of five major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, Look Magazine, The United Press International, Collier's Magazine and the International News Service.

1952 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1952 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1952 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of five major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, Look Magazine, The United Press International, Collier's Magazine and the International News Service.

1952 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1952 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the team's 71st season in Major League Baseball, and their 66th season in the National League. The Pirates posted a record of 42 wins and 112 losses, their worst record since 1890, and one of the worst in major league history.

1960 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1960 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the team's 79th season. The team finished with a record of 95–59–1, seven games in front of the second-place Milwaukee Braves to win their first National League championship in 33 seasons. The team went on to play the heavily favored New York Yankees, whom they defeated 4 games to 3 in one of the most storied World Series ever.

1960 World Series

The 1960 World Series was played between the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League (NL) and the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) from October 5 to 13, 1960. It is most notable for the Game 7, ninth-inning home run hit by Bill Mazeroski, the only time a winner-take-all World Series game has ended with a walk-off home run.

Despite losing the series, the Yankees scored 55 runs, the most runs scored by any one team in World Series history, a unique record, and more than twice as many as the Pirates, who scored 27 runs. The Yankees won three blowout games (16–3, 10–0, and 12–0), while the Pirates won four close games (6–4, 3–2, 5–2, and 10–9) to win the series. The Series MVP was Bobby Richardson of the Yankees, the only time in history that the award has been given to a member of the losing team.

This World Series featured seven past, present, or future league Most Valuable Players. The Pirates had two – Dick Groat (1960) and Roberto Clemente (1966) – while the Yankees had five: Yogi Berra (1951, 1954, 1955), Bobby Shantz (1952), Mickey Mantle (1956, 1957, 1962), Roger Maris (1960, 1961), and Elston Howard (1963).

As noted in the superstition called the "Ex-Cub Factor", this was the only Series after 1945 and until 2001 in which a team with three or more former members of the Chicago Cubs (Don Hoak, Smoky Burgess, and Gene Baker) was able to win a World Series.

The World Championship for the Pirates was their third overall and first since 1925.

1962 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (first game)

The first 1962 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 32nd playing of Major League Baseball's annual midsummer exhibition game between the American League and National League. President John F. Kennedy was the second president to attend the event and threw out the first pitch. A highlight of the game was the first presentation of the Arch Ward Trophy. It was first presented in 1962 as a tribute to the man who helped found the All-Star Game in 1933. That first presentation went to Leon Wagner of the Los Angeles Angels (second game MVP) and to Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers (first game MVP), because two Midsummer Classics were played.The spotlight on this game belonged to Maury Wills. Entering the lineup in the sixth inning to pinch-run for Stan Musial, he stole second then scored the first run of the game off a Dick Groat single. In the eighth inning, Wills reached base by a single. He rounded second on a short single hit by Jim Davenport to left field. Wills reached third base safely and scored on a foul to right field moments later. This performance earned him the first All-Star Most Valuable Player Award. Roberto Clemente was a key contributor with three hits in the game.

1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 34th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1963 in Cleveland, Ohio, at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, home of the American League's Cleveland Indians. The game was won by the National League 5–3.

From 1959 to 1962, baseball experimented with a pair of All-Star Games per year. That ended with this 1963 game, which also marked the 30th anniversary of the inaugural All-Star Game played in Chicago in 1933.

1963 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1963 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 82nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 72nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93–69 (.574) during the season, and finished 2nd in the National League, six games behind the eventual World Series champion 8Los Angeles Dodgers. The season was Stan Musial's 22nd and final season with the team, and in MLB.

1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 35th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 7, 1964, at Shea Stadium in New York City, New York, home of the New York Mets of the National League. The game was a 7–4 victory for the NL. Johnny Callison hit a walk-off home run, the most recent MLB All-Star game to end in such a fashion.

1965 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1965 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 84th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 74th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 80–81 during the season and finished seventh in the National League, 16½ games behind the eventual World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers. It was also the last full season for the original Busch Stadium.

1967 San Francisco Giants season

The 1967 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 85th year in Major League Baseball, their tenth year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their eighth at Candlestick Park. The team finished in second place in the National League with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses, 10½ games behind the NL and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals.

Bill Hillgrove

Bill Hillgrove (born November 20, 1940) is an American sports journalist, radio personality, and sports broadcaster. He is currently the lead play-by-play broadcaster for the Pittsburgh Steelers football network (102.5 WDVE) and for the University of Pittsburgh sports network (93.7 The Fan). He calls Pitt football games with Bill Osborn, and Pitt basketball games with National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Famer Dick Groat and former Pitt guard Curtis Aiken.

Ducky Schofield

John Richard Schofield (born January 7, 1935), nicknamed Ducky, is an American former professional baseball infielder. He played nineteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1953 to 1971 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Pittsburgh Pirates, San Francisco Giants, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Boston Red Sox, and Milwaukee Brewers.Schofield made his Major League Baseball debut with the St. Louis Cardinals on July 3, 1953, and appeared in his final game on September 30, 1971 for the Milwaukee Brewers. Ducky was a member of the 1960 World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates and played a pivotal role in the team's N.L. pennant. It appeared the Pirates had suffered a huge loss on September 6, 1960 when team captain Dick Groat, who would subsequently be honored as both the National League's batting champion and most valuable player, suffered a broken wrist. Schofield took over as the Pirates' shortstop and batted .403 through the end of the season to help the Pirates clinch the N.L. pennant. He also hit .333 in the World Series (1 hit in 3 at-bats) after Groat returned. Schofield was also the first player to bat at Shea Stadium in 1964, with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Schofield is the father of daughters Kim Schofield Werth, who competed in the U.S. Olympic Trials in the long jump and 100 meters, and Tammy; and son, former Major League Baseball player Dick Schofield and the grandfather of former MLB outfielder Jayson Werth. Ducky, Dick, and Jayson all played for the Los Angeles Dodgers at one point in their respective careers. Ducky was also known as Dick Schofield, going by his middle name. His son's first name is Richard, so is technically not a "Junior".

Schofield resides in Springfield, Illinois where he is currently an elected official, serving on the Springfield Metropolitan Exposition and Auditorium Authority. His wife, Donna (Dabney) Schofield, died November 8, 2012. The couple had been married for 56 years.

Groat (surname)

Groat is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Dick Groat (born 1930), former two-sport athlete

Nikkie Groat (21st century), Miss Teen USA 2005 delegate

Jerry Lynch

Gerald Thomas Lynch (July 17, 1930 – March 31, 2012), nicknamed "The Hat", was an American professional baseball outfielder and pinch hitter. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1954 to 1966 for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Cincinnati Reds.

He was born in Bay City, Michigan. After two years of military service, he made his Major League debut at age 23 on April 15, 1954 in a 7-4 Pirates' loss to the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field. Starting in right field and batting third, he had one hit in four at bats. In his first three at-bats he flied out twice and struck out once against Dodgers pitcher Russ Meyer. His first career hit came in the ninth inning off Meyer, as he singled and also drove in his first two runs.Lynch helped the Reds win the 1961 National League pennant. On September 26, 1961, he propelled the Reds into the World Series with his two-run home run off Cubs pitcher Bob Anderson, scoring Vada Pinson. He finished 22nd in voting for the 1961 NL MVP. He was hitless in three official at bats and four plate appearances during the 1961 World Series, which the Reds lost in five games to the New York Yankees.

Lynch is considered one of baseball's all-time best pinch hitters. He had 116 pinch hits during his career, which ranks him 10th on the all-time list. Lynch is third on the all-time pinch hit home run list (he was first when he retired) with 18, with five of those coming during the 1961 season while driving in 25 runs.Lynch was once quoted as saying, "The good pinch-hitter is the guy who can relax enough to get the pitch he can hit. You almost always do get one pitch to hit every time you bat. So you have to have the patience to wait. And then you've got to be able to handle the pitch when you get it."In 13 seasons, he played in 1,184 games with 2,879 at bats, 364 runs, 798 hits, 123 doubles, 34 triples, 115 home runs, 470 RBI, 224 walks, .277 batting average, .329 on-base percentage, .463 slugging percentage and 1,334 total bases.After his baseball career ended, Lynch partnered with former Pirates teammate Dick Groat to operate the Champion Lakes Golf Course in Ligonier, Pennsylvania. He retired to the Atlanta, Georgia area in the late 1980s. Lynch died on March 31, 2012 at age 81 in Atlanta. He was survived by his wife Alice, sons Mark, Keith and Gerald, and daughter Kimberly.

List of Major League Baseball annual fielding errors leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in fielding errors in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

Herman Long is the all-time leader in errors, committing 1,096 in his career. Long and Billy Shindle hold the record for most fielding errors in a season, with Long committing 122 errors in 1889, and Shindle committing 122 errors the following year in 1890. Adrián Beltré is the active leader in fielding errors, leading the league once in 1999.

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