Dick Anderson

Richard Paul "Dick" Anderson (born February 10, 1946) is a former American college and professional football player who was a safety for the Miami Dolphins of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons during the 1960s and 1970s. He played college football for the University of Colorado, and was recognized as a consensus All-American. He was selected in third round of the 1968 AFL Draft, and he played for his entire professional career for the Dolphins.

Dick Anderson
refer to caption
Anderson in 2014
No. 40
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:February 10, 1946 (age 73)
Midland, Michigan
Career information
High school:Boulder (Boulder, Colorado)
College:Colorado
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 3 / Pick: 73
AFL draft:1968 / Round: 3 / Pick: 68
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:34
Interception return yards:792
Touchdowns:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Career

Anderson was named a consensus first-team All-American in his senior season and set a school record with 14 career interceptions. He was drafted by the Dolphins in the 1968 AFL Draft in which he was named the league defensive rookie of the year. He was a three-time Pro Bowler in 1972, 1973 in which he was NFL Defensive Player of the Year and in 1974 in which he was one of the leaders of the Dolphins well known No Name Defense. Anderson was also the president of the National Football League Players Association from 1975 until he retired.

In his nine AFL/NFL seasons, Anderson recorded 34 interceptions, which he returned for 792 yards and 3 touchdowns. He also recovered 15 fumbles, returning them for 100 yards and a touchdown. On special teams, he gained 430 yards returning kickoffs and punted the ball nine times for 335 yards.

After retirement, Anderson became a successful businessman and a Florida state senator. In 1993, he was enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame. His brother is Bobby Anderson, who was a running back for Colorado. His son, Blake Anderson played wide receiver for the University of Colorado.

On December 3, 1973, Anderson had perhaps his greatest personal effort in his career, becoming the 7th player to intercept 4 passes in a single game in NFL history in the Dolphins 30-26 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers. Since that date, another six players have tied that mark.[1]

On December 3, 2006, Anderson was inducted into the Miami Dolphins Honor Roll during halftime of the Dolphins-Jaguars game. He is one of two players inducted that year, the other being Richmond Webb, who was inducted December 25 against the Jets. Anderson was the first individual defensive back inducted into the Honor Roll. The entire 1972 Miami Dolphins roster is a part of the Honor Roll, including Anderson.

Celebrity Golf

Anderson has competed at the American Century Championship, an annual competition to determine the best golfers among American sports and entertainment celebrities. He won the tournament in 1994 and has a total of eleven top ten finishes.[2] The tournament, televised by NBC in July, is played at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course in Lake Tahoe, Nevada.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Monday Night Football - Dec. 3, 1973 - Pittsburgh at Miami". Espn.go.com. 2002-09-19. Retrieved 2012-08-06.
  2. ^ "American Century Championship Top Ten Performances". Tahoe Celebrity Golf.com. Retrieved July 16, 2010.
  3. ^ "The Golf Course". Edgewood Tahoe.com. Retrieved July 16, 2010.

External links

1972 Miami Dolphins season

The 1972 Miami Dolphins season was the team’s seventh season, and third season in the National Football League (NFL). The 1972 Dolphins are the only NFL team to win the Super Bowl with a perfect season. The undefeated campaign was led by coach Don Shula and notable players Bob Griese, Earl Morrall, and Larry Csonka. The 1972 Dolphins went 14–0 in the regular season and won all three post-season games, including Super Bowl VII against the Washington Redskins, to finish 17–0.

The team remains the only NFL team to complete an entire season undefeated and untied from the opening game through the Super Bowl (or championship game). The closest team to repeating this feat was the 2007 New England Patriots, who recorded the most wins in a season in NFL history by going 18–0 before shockingly losing to the New York Giants in Super Bowl XLII (the Dolphins won 18 straight through and until the first week of the 1973 season). Besides the 1972 Dolphins and 2007 Patriots, the only other team to ever complete the regular season undefeated and untied is the Chicago Bears, who accomplished the feat in both 1934 and 1942. Both of those Bears teams however failed to win the NFL Championship Game.

During the 1972 season, Bob Griese’s ankle was broken in Week 5 as he was sacked by San Diego Chargers defensive tackle Ron East and defensive end Deacon Jones. He was replaced by veteran Earl Morrall for the rest of the regular season. Griese returned to the field as a substitute in the final regular season game against the Baltimore Colts and then also relieved Morrall for the second half of the AFC Championship game versus the Pittsburgh Steelers and then started for Miami in Super Bowl VII. On the ground, running backs Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris became the first teammates to each rush for 1,000 yards in a season. Paul Warfield led the receivers, averaging over 20 yards per catch on 29 receptions. The offensive line included future Hall of Fame members Jim Langer and Larry Little and Pro Bowler Norm Evans.

The 1972 Dolphins defensive unit, called the No-Name Defense because Miami’s impressive offense received much more publicity, as well as Cowboys coach Tom Landry coining the phrase in an interview, was the league’s best that year. It was led by linebacker Nick Buoniconti, end Bill Stanfill, tackle Manny Fernandez, and safeties Dick Anderson and Jake Scott. In all, nine players—Csonka, Morris, Warfield, Little, Evans, Buoniconti, Stanfill, Anderson and Scott—were selected to the Pro Bowl, and Morrall, Stanfill and Anderson were named 1st team All-Pro.On August 20, 2013, four decades after their accomplishment, President Barack Obama hosted the 1972 Dolphins, noting that they "never got their White House visit".

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1984 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1984 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 7–3 record while competing as an independent and outscored their opponents 213 to 155. The team's statistical leaders included Erich Hochberg with 1,909 passing yards, Albert Smith with 869 rushing yards, and Andrew Baker with 533 receiving yards.

1985 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1985 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 2–8–1 record while competing as an independent and were outscored by their opponents 266 to 149. The team's statistical leaders included Joe Gagliardi with 1,273 passing yards, Albert Smith with 362 rushing yards and 244 receiving yards.

1986 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1986 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 5–5–1 record while competing as an independent and outscored their opponents 221 to 189. The team's statistical leaders included Scott Erney with 1,160 passing yards, Matt Prescott with 606 rushing yards, and Brian Cobb with 368s receiving yards.

1987 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1987 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 6–5 record while competing as an independent and were outscored by their opponents 213 to 168. The team's statistical leaders included Scott Erney with 1,369 passing yards, Henry Henderson with 846 rushing yards, and Eric Young with 364 receiving yards.

1988 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1988 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 5–6 record while competing as an independent and outscored their opponents 273 to 255. They won games against two ranked opponents, Michigan State (17-13) and Penn State (21-16). The team's statistical leaders included Scott Erney with 2,123 passing yards, Mike Botti with 715 rushing yards, and Eric Young with 592 receiving yards.

1989 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1989 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth and final season under head coach Dick Anderson, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 2–7–2 record while competing as an independent and were outscored by their opponents 319 to 245. The team won victories over Boston College (9-7) and Northwestern (38-27). The team's statistical leaders included Scott Erney with 2,536 passing yards, James Cann with 429 rushing yards, and Randy Jackson with 599 receiving yards.

Boulder High School

Boulder High School is a high school in Boulder, Colorado, United States. It is part of the Boulder Valley School District.

Boulder High School was founded in 1875 as a preparatory school to the University of Colorado. In 1876, it was the first high school in Colorado to graduate a class. The school is located in downtown Boulder, adjacent to the university’s campus and four blocks from the Pearl Street Mall.

Chet Pollert

Chet Pollert (born April 20, 1955) is an American politician. He is a member of the North Dakota House of Representatives from the 29th District, serving since 1998. He is a member of the Republican party.In November 2018, members of the House Majority Republican party chose Pollert as their Majority Leader. The previous leader, Representative Al Carlson was defeated in his reelection campaign.

Colorado Buffaloes football

The Colorado Buffaloes football program represents the University of Colorado Boulder in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level. The team is currently a member of the Pac-12 Conference, having previously been a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Before joining the Big 12, they were members of the Big Eight Conference. The CU football team has played at Folsom Field since 1924. The Buffs all-time record is 694–493–36 (.583 winning percentage) prior to the Valero Alamo Bowl at the end of the 2016 season. Colorado won a National Championship in 1990. The football program is 23rd on the all-time win list and 30th in all-time winning percentage.

Dick Anderson (American football, born 1941)

Richard E. "Dick" Anderson (born July 29, 1941) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Rutgers University from 1984 to 1989, compiling a record of 28–33–4. His highlight victory during that span was 21–16 win over Penn State in 1988—Rutgers' first win over the Nittany Lions in 70 years. He played college football at Penn State, and served there as an assistant football coach for many years under Joe Paterno.

Dick Anderson (politician)

Dick Anderson (born June 15, 1952) is an American politician. He has served as a Republican member for the 6th district in the North Dakota House of Representatives since 2011.

Dick J. Anderson

Richard Joseph Anderson (born January 26, 1944) is a former American football player who played for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League in 1967. During his brief NFL career, Anderson played in two games and scored two points on a safety. He played college football at Ohio State University.

Miami Dolphins

The Miami Dolphins are a professional American football team based in the Miami metropolitan area. The Dolphins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The Dolphins play their home games at Hard Rock Stadium in the northern suburb of Miami Gardens, Florida, and are headquartered in Davie, Florida. The Dolphins are Florida's oldest professional sports team. Of the four AFC East teams, they are the only team in the division that was not a charter member of the American Football League (AFL).

The Dolphins were founded by attorney-politician Joe Robbie and actor-comedian Danny Thomas. They began play in the AFL in 1966. The region had not had a professional football team since the days of the Miami Seahawks, who played in the All-America Football Conference in 1946, before becoming the first incarnation of the Baltimore Colts. For the first few years, the Dolphins' full-time training camp and practice facilities were at Saint Andrew's School, a private boys boarding prep school in Boca Raton. In the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, the Dolphins joined the NFL.

The team made its first Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl VI, losing to the Dallas Cowboys, 24–3. The following year, the Dolphins completed the NFL's only perfect season, culminating in a Super Bowl win, winning all 14 of their regular season games, and all three of their playoff games, including Super Bowl VII. They were the third NFL team to accomplish a perfect regular season. The next year, the Dolphins won Super Bowl VIII, becoming the first team to appear in three consecutive Super Bowls, and the second team (the first AFL/AFC team) to win back-to-back championships. Miami also appeared in Super Bowl XVII and Super Bowl XIX, losing both games.

For most of their early history, the Dolphins were coached by Don Shula, the most successful head coach in professional football history in terms of total games won. Under Shula, the Dolphins posted losing records in only two of his 26 seasons as the head coach. During the period spanning 1983 to the end of 1999, quarterback Dan Marino became one of the most prolific passers in NFL history, breaking numerous league passing records. Marino led the Dolphins to five division titles, 10 playoff appearances and Super Bowl XIX before retiring following the 1999 season.

In 2008, the Dolphins became the first team in NFL history to win their division and make a playoff appearance following a league-worst 1–15 season. That same season, the Dolphins upset the 16–0 New England Patriots on the road during Week 3, handing the Patriots' their first regular season loss since December 10, 2006, in which coincidentally, they were also beaten by the Dolphins.

Richard Anderson (disambiguation)

Richard Anderson (1926–2017) was an American actor.

Richard, Rich or Dick Anderson may also refer to:

Richard A. Anderson (1948–1969), American soldier and Vietnam War Medal of Honor recipient

Richard B. Anderson (1921–1944), American soldier and World War II Medal of Honor recipient

USS Richard B. Anderson (DD-786), US Navy destroyer named in his honor

Richard C. Anderson (born 1934), American educational psychologist

Richard Clough Anderson Jr. (1788–1826), American lawyer, politician, and diplomat

Richard Clough Anderson Sr. (1750-1826), American Revolutionary War veteran, surveyor of Virginia Military District

Richard Davis Anderson (1922–2008), American mathematician

Richard Dean Anderson (born 1950), American actor

Richard Elias Anderson (born 1977), Canadian basketball player

Richard H. Anderson (1821–1879), American army officer and Confederate general in the American Civil War

Richard H. Anderson (businessman) (born 1956), American attorney and CEO

Richard Lloyd Anderson (1926–2018), BYU professor and Mormon historian

Richard Loree Anderson (1915–2003), American econometrician

Richard L. Anderson (sound effects editor), American sound effects editor

Richard Anderson (basketball) (born 1960), American basketball player

Richard Anderson (British Army officer) (1907–1979), British Army general

Rich Anderson (Virginia politician) (born 1955), Republican, member of Virginia House of Delegates, District 51

Rich Anderson (Iowa politician) (born 1956), Iowa state legislator

Dick Anderson (born 1946), American football player, Miami Dolphins and College Football Hall of Fame inductee

Dick Anderson (American football, born 1941), Rutgers University head football coach from 1984 to 1989

Dick J. Anderson (born 1944), American football player for the New Orleans Saints

Dick Anderson (politician) (born 1952), member of the North Dakota House of Representatives

Big Dad Ritch (James Richard Anderson), lead vocalist for red dirt metal band Texas Hippie Coalition

Richmond Webb

Richmond Jewel Webb (born January 11, 1967) is a former National Football League offensive tackle with the Miami Dolphins and the Cincinnati Bengals. Webb played college football for Texas A&M University. He was selected by the Dolphins as the ninth overall pick in the 1990 NFL Draft.

He played for the Dolphins for eleven seasons and set team records for 118 consecutive starts and seven consecutive Pro Bowls. After playing for the Dolphins, Webb played two seasons for the Bengals. His career declined due to injuries, and though he tried out for the Dolphins in 2003, Webb wasn't signed and he decided to retire in the fall of 2004. On July 9, 2005, Webb signed a one-day contract to retire as a member of the Dolphins.On December 25, 2006, Webb was inducted into the Dolphins Honor Roll. He was the second Miami player to be inducted in 2006, following Dick Anderson, and the 16th overall.Webb attended Dallas Independent School District's Roosevelt High School, where his teammates included future NFL players Aaron Wallace and Kevin Williams.

Rick Rhoden

Richard Alan Rhoden (born May 16, 1953) is a professional golfer and was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. During his 16-year baseball career, he played for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1974–1978), Pittsburgh Pirates (1979–1986) and Houston Astros (1989) of the National League; and the New York Yankees (1987–1988) of the American League.

Rutgers Scarlet Knights football

The Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represents Rutgers University in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA). Rutgers competes as a member of the East Division of the Big Ten Conference. Prior to joining the Big Ten, the team was a member of the American Athletic Conference (formerly the Big East Conference) from 1991 to 2013. Rutgers plays its home games at High Point Solutions Stadium, in Piscataway, New Jersey. The team is currently led by head coach Chris Ash.

The Rutgers football team is notable for playing in what is considered to be the first ever intercollegiate football game in 1869, in which they defeated Princeton University by a score of 6–4. For this reason, Rutgers has been described as "the birthplace of college football."

Offense
Defense
Miami Dolphins Honor Roll inductees
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